Inclusive Design ChallengeThursday 20th September 2012Tavis House1-6 Tavistock SquareLondonWC1H 9NA
WelcomeIan RutterSenior ManagerEngage Business Network
Curventa: http://www.curventa.co.ukSabotage Design: http://www.sabotagedesign.co.ukFrazer Design: http://www.frazerdesigne...
13:30: Registration13:45: Welcome:         Ian Rutter, Engage Business Network13:55: The Commercial Benefits of an Inclusi...
If there was one thing that the Paralympics did,what would it be?"We will never think of disability the same way." Lord Co...
Andrew Slorance, 42, declares: I wanted to do something reallydifferent, something that was going to make a difference to ...
“When you look at a paralympic athlete firing down the track oncarbon fibre limbs you don’t look at them and think ‘poor s...
The Commercial Benefits of anInclusive Design ApproachAndy FayleSenior DesignerTheAlloy
The Commercial Benefits of an Inclusive Design Approach                     Andy Fayle, Senior Designer              Age U...
Great experiences across many sectors
Human behaviour drives business resultsW help companies understand human behaviour e
Every perception informs behaviourEvery sight, every touch, every interaction
Experience Led Design helps you create better perceptions
Perceptions driven by a mosaic of interactions & experiences
Experience mapping   First sight   POS   First Use   Routine   Extreme   Upgrade                                    use   ...
Experience orchestration & choreography
How? – Mapping the customer experience
Inclusive = Universal
Design for the widest possible audience
BT – Home HubOver 6 million users
BT – Freestyle 750‘Inclusive led’ mass market appeal
BT – Converse MK11991: “special needs, meets heavy users”
Inc. MobileNot a phone for the elderly, simply easier to use
WellTogether – Home padFit current behaviours and nurture new
RNID – SoundspaceBlur boundaries, create opportunity
PZ Cussons – Original Source‘Inclusive approach’ in everyday environments
E2V – Thermal imaging camera‘Inclusive approach’ in extreme environments
SummaryHuman behaviour drives business resultsSuccess depends on a deep understanding ofthe customerInclusive design consi...
Unlocking the Potential of theYounger Old ConsumerProfessor Andree WoodcockLeader of the Integrated Transport and Logistic...
Overview of Presentation•   Scope of project•   Definition of e-ALTs•   Data gathering methods•   Barriers to uptake of e-...
Scope of COMODAL ProjectThe aim of the COMODAL project is to support the development of aconsumer market for electronic as...
Definition of E-ALTs• Assistive technology is defined by the COMODAL as any productor service defined to support independe...
Data Gathering Methods•             Literature review•             Product review•             Market analysis•           ...
Top Categories of Daily Living     Problems• From a previous survey by Years Ahead of 3000 actual andpotential consumers1....
Top Three Purchasing Triggers• From a previous survey by Years Ahead of 3000 actual andpotential consumers1.Professional r...
Each Stage in ALT Purchasing hasBarriers
Design Related Barriers1.     Lack of application of UCD or universal design principles2.     Products may be perceived as...
Characterisation of ALT Market• Not fully mainstream• Differentiated from other markets by low levels of publicawareness, ...
Consumer Groups Identified byCOMODAL
Profile of Purchasing Behaviour of Personal Consumers50-70 years (already buy and use ALTs)Getting out and about most comm...
Profile of Purchasing Behaviour of Prospective Consumers50-70 years (don’t buy and don’t use ALTs)More likely to struggle ...
Profiles of Purchasing Behaviour ofCarer Consumer50-70 years ( buy but don’t use ALTs)Moving safely around home is the mai...
Profiles of Purchasing Behaviour of Non Purchasing User/Consumer50-70 years ( use but don’t buy ALTs)Hardest group to reac...
Factors Effecting Uptake of ALTs
Industry Perspective on Barriers1. Lack of awareness of existence, choice and benefits of ALTs   among public, statutory a...
Information Needs•   Information needs to be: inclusive, realistic, provide enough    information to ‘compare and contrast...
Inclusive Information Provision
ConclusionsThe market for the products, especially universal mainstream ones isthere, but consumer awareness of these type...
Future WorkThe next stage of the project will focus on how we can use theunderstanding from Stage 1•To improve the communi...
Sponsorship and Further DetailsCOMODAL is led by Coventry University in partnership withAge UK and Grandparents Plus, as p...
The ChallengeAnna McConnellProduct and Service Design ResearcherEngage Business Network and Brunel University
Desirable   FunctionalSimple      Usable
The Brief and ProcessDesign a product that increases the enjoyment and/or safety of aneveryday activity                   ...
The Brief and ProcessDesign a product that increases the enjoyment and/or safety of aneveryday activity                   ...
The Brief and ProcessDesign a product that increases the enjoyment and/or safety of aneveryday activity                   ...
The Brief and ProcessDesign a product that increases the enjoyment and/or safety of aneveryday activity                   ...
The Brief and ProcessDesign a product that increases the enjoyment and/or safety of aneveryday activity                   ...
Deliver• The process• Challenges and opportunities• What’s the idea?   • And how does it address the needs of     your use...
Engage Business NetworkLatest Members:HomebaseTalkTalkBarclaycard Fraud Prevention
Engage Business NetworkResearch and business insight into the 60+ population.Seminars, events and networking opportunities...
Engage Business NetworkDates for your Diary25th OctoberEmployment Forum – a debate with panel membersfrom DWP, TAEN, Asda,...
Engage Business Network“The Wireless”Advertising OpportunitiesA radio station aimed at “grown-ups”DAB Digital launch 24th ...
Inclusive Design Challenge
Inclusive Design Challenge
Inclusive Design Challenge
Inclusive Design Challenge
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Inclusive Design Challenge

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  • Reason why we use the word experience is that is what we create, design is the tool we use. Also need to highlight the word approach – this isnt about specific projects, but a philosophy
  • We apply incusive to all we do from baby monitors to professional equipment
  • Design not for looks but to increase biz success – to increase the success of a biz we believe you need to understand humans and how we behave
  • To do this we have to step back and understand what informs our behaviour, ie our senses are reacting to everything we interact with creating the experience Perception is the process of attaining awareness or understanding of the environment or object by organising and interpreting sensory information
  • Understanding the experiences let us choreograph better perceptions that can influence human behaviour. Better experience drives brand loyalty and recommendations – more sales
  • Examine the experiences people have with organisations – numerous – over the course of a lifetime there are 000’s delivered through products, interfaces, services.
  • Number of experiences and the variety of human behaviour and decision making make this a complex job We break it down – simple, generic model we use is this….
  • We like to use the concept of orchestration / choreography – that there is a guiding (invisible) hand whose role is to ensure integration, but who isnt responsible for the immediate output (playing) The concept of a conductor is interesting – every player a professional – world class, every instrument unique – complex. Yet there is a person that controls all of this, someone who isnt playing an instrument (likely they do, but not all) Yet this person is at the centre of success – he / she is able to command the respect of all players because he makes them all look good – he manages and massages performances from individuals for the greater good. – he stands at the front, not from ego, but because the players need to see him and people want to see the players..
  • So to understand this complexity and variety of experiences and decisions we employ 3 key tools. Value of role play is massive – use the gloves later, but it is about inspiration…
  • Already mentioned broad application of the approach, all too often it is used for old / disabled… Japan use the term universal, which is pehaps more accurate Inclusive means designing the for the widest possible audience… LABOUR THIS POINT
  • Sabi; Vivacity collection – designed by fuse projects. Emotional + physical barriers ‘pills in public’ Balance of improved ergonomics and functional, stand out form, elegant detailing and colours Appeals to all, doesn’t patronise
  • One of our big clients – we do a lot. Huge audience. Their market is almost universal; it needs to work for almost everyone. Easy self install, legible instructions
  • Specific emphasis on this home phone. Alternative approach is an ‘inclusive’ product; its improved functionality appeals to masses. Usability is universal. Nominally designed for the elderly, it is the 6 th best selling phone. Simple and easy to use – application of the inclusive approach produces results. Used in restaurants, kitchens and my home…. Iphone is a similar example – babies and grandmas use them because the are designed to operate in a way humans understand.
  • Genesis for the freestyle range was converse Emanating from special needs group within BT Clear spacing of keys, moving letters off the keys onto body = easier to use, clarity etc. Sold 100x more than anticipated…
  • 8 years ago now – still not answered A phone for the glamourpuss…. Ageing, but not old, wears glasses (armani ‘natch’) Same principles – spaced keys, readable displays, intuitive ui – BUT not a phone for the elderly.
  • Widest possible audience is providers and receivers. Fitting care giver routines, busy families through digital platform Assisted living, Health and wellness tracking Same Inclusive approach – clear layout, buttons, etc Doesn’t patronise – fits with behaviours and encourages new (enriches lives); allows family communication, pushed mail and news, natural health + wellness monitoring.
  • Same approach Hearing aids needed by 10 m people Only 2 mill have them, often bought after years of badgering by wife / friends. In that time they have got used to the silence – so soundshock occurs and they stop using them… Why – because the sight of flesh coloured blob is a stigma, yet we have ipods and bluetooth that are willingly bought Blur the line and encourage greater, quicker adoption More to this, but this shows how a true inclusive approach inverts problems and creates opps
  • One by us Cant grip, cant see through soap Grippy surfaces, driven by user insight.
  • Final piece Mentioned pro equipment Fireman in a burning room wearing protective equipment are effectively disabled – sight, sound, touch – everything impaired Designed to be handed over easily, quickly…
  • Summary – key points
  • Inclusive Design Challenge

    1. 1. Inclusive Design ChallengeThursday 20th September 2012Tavis House1-6 Tavistock SquareLondonWC1H 9NA
    2. 2. WelcomeIan RutterSenior ManagerEngage Business Network
    3. 3. Curventa: http://www.curventa.co.ukSabotage Design: http://www.sabotagedesign.co.ukFrazer Design: http://www.frazerdesigners.comSprout Design: http://www.sproutdesign.co.ukThe Alloy: http://thealloy.com
    4. 4. 13:30: Registration13:45: Welcome: Ian Rutter, Engage Business Network13:55: The Commercial Benefits of an Inclusive Design Approach Andy Fayle, TheAlloy14:05: Unlocking the potential of the younger older consumer: Andree Woodcock, University of Coventry14:25: An Inclusive Approach: Anna McConnell, Engage Business Network14:35: Inclusive Design Challenge17:30: Close: Ian Rutter, Engage Business Network
    5. 5. If there was one thing that the Paralympics did,what would it be?"We will never think of disability the same way." Lord CoeI really genuinely think we have had a seismic effect in shifting publicattitudes. I dont think people will ever see sport the same way again, Idont think they will ever see disability in the same way again. One ofthe most powerful observations was made to me, by one of ourvolunteers, who talked about having lifted some of the clouds oflimitation.
    6. 6. Andrew Slorance, 42, declares: I wanted to do something reallydifferent, something that was going to make a difference to otherpeople and a difference to me in my own life.A wheelchair user since he was paralysed in a fall from a tree in hisearly teens, Nairn-based Andrew has always been frustrated bystandard wheelchairs - what he sees as their limitations and lack ofappeal. His quest is to make and sell the perfect wheelchair. AsAndrews wife Mary says, Why not have a wheelchair that is supersexy looking?
    7. 7. “When you look at a paralympic athlete firing down the track oncarbon fibre limbs you don’t look at them and think ‘poor sod that ithappened to them’.“You think ‘wow, what awesome limbs...’ Or at least I do.“I have been thinking that if I can take that positivity and give it to thewheelchair user it will be a big advance in awareness and quality oflife for a lot of people.”
    8. 8. The Commercial Benefits of anInclusive Design ApproachAndy FayleSenior DesignerTheAlloy
    9. 9. The Commercial Benefits of an Inclusive Design Approach Andy Fayle, Senior Designer Age UK Inclusive Design Challenge 20.09.12
    10. 10. Great experiences across many sectors
    11. 11. Human behaviour drives business resultsW help companies understand human behaviour e
    12. 12. Every perception informs behaviourEvery sight, every touch, every interaction
    13. 13. Experience Led Design helps you create better perceptions
    14. 14. Perceptions driven by a mosaic of interactions & experiences
    15. 15. Experience mapping First sight POS First Use Routine Extreme Upgrade use use
    16. 16. Experience orchestration & choreography
    17. 17. How? – Mapping the customer experience
    18. 18. Inclusive = Universal
    19. 19. Design for the widest possible audience
    20. 20. BT – Home HubOver 6 million users
    21. 21. BT – Freestyle 750‘Inclusive led’ mass market appeal
    22. 22. BT – Converse MK11991: “special needs, meets heavy users”
    23. 23. Inc. MobileNot a phone for the elderly, simply easier to use
    24. 24. WellTogether – Home padFit current behaviours and nurture new
    25. 25. RNID – SoundspaceBlur boundaries, create opportunity
    26. 26. PZ Cussons – Original Source‘Inclusive approach’ in everyday environments
    27. 27. E2V – Thermal imaging camera‘Inclusive approach’ in extreme environments
    28. 28. SummaryHuman behaviour drives business resultsSuccess depends on a deep understanding ofthe customerInclusive design considers the widest possibleaudience
    29. 29. Unlocking the Potential of theYounger Old ConsumerProfessor Andree WoodcockLeader of the Integrated Transport and LogisticsGrand ChallengeCoventry School of Art and Design
    30. 30. Overview of Presentation• Scope of project• Definition of e-ALTs• Data gathering methods• Barriers to uptake of e-ALTs• Unlocking the potential of the younger older consumer• Selling e-ALTs to consumers
    31. 31. Scope of COMODAL ProjectThe aim of the COMODAL project is to support the development of aconsumer market for electronic assisted living technologies (e-ALTs)for younger older people, i.e. those approaching retirement and olderage in the 50-70 year age range.The aims of Stage 1, reported here were• To develop an understanding of the needs of younger older peopleas users and purchasers of ALTs• To investigate the barriers and enablers of ALT adoption in thisgroup.In Stage 2 , this information will be used to design effective solutionsto overcome the barriers and promote the factors which will enablethe ALT market to flourish.
    32. 32. Definition of E-ALTs• Assistive technology is defined by the COMODAL as any productor service defined to support independent living• The work reported here was based on this broad definition• In the next stages of the research we will be restricting this to :• Environmental control technologies and services• Telehealth and telecare technologies and services• IT based devices and services used to support health and wellbeing (e.g. health apps)• Electronic Assistive Technologies (E-ALTs), including telecareand telehealth is where the biggest gap in knowledge is found.
    33. 33. Data Gathering Methods• Literature review• Product review• Market analysis• Consumer street survey• Gathering industry perspectives
    34. 34. Top Categories of Daily Living Problems• From a previous survey by Years Ahead of 3000 actual andpotential consumers1.Just keep going and struggle on2. Getting out and about3.Household chores4.DIY and gardening5.Getting up and ready for the day6.Preparing and cooking foodRelatively few people would ‘buy a product’ or ‘seek practical help inthe home’
    35. 35. Top Three Purchasing Triggers• From a previous survey by Years Ahead of 3000 actual andpotential consumers1.Professional recommendation2.Recommendation by a friend or family member3.Onset of a health condition or change related to ageing
    36. 36. Each Stage in ALT Purchasing hasBarriers
    37. 37. Design Related Barriers1. Lack of application of UCD or universal design principles2. Products may be perceived as giving away control3. As stigmatising (lack of discretion, privacy and poor aesthetics)4. Not meeting hidden wishes, desires and aspirations, not taking account of pleasure in use or the user experience5. Products may cater for one disability, not the complex range of needs, and may not be adaptable6. Lack of understanding of context7. Economic feasibility, including affordable, maintenance and tendency for built in obsolescence8. Products do not fit into people’s lives
    38. 38. Characterisation of ALT Market• Not fully mainstream• Differentiated from other markets by low levels of publicawareness, high levels of expert advice needed, complicationsregarding VAT• Decrease in public purse will mean that ALTs will be moreavailable in mainstream markets• Drivers include:• Interest among national retailers• Growing recognition of ageing consumer base• Saturation of other mainstream market categories• Growing awareness of ALTs among carers and younger older people• Lower barriers of entry into market place• Changing attitudes towards individualism, self help &self provision• Wider recognition of opportunities and challenges of an ageingpopulation
    39. 39. Consumer Groups Identified byCOMODAL
    40. 40. Profile of Purchasing Behaviour of Personal Consumers50-70 years (already buy and use ALTs)Getting out and about most common daily issueMore likely to use a mobility/specialist outletLeast likely to use/approach council for adviceNo one else involved in purchase decisionAccess to information and social networksAccess to improved informationKeen to see new models of purchase
    41. 41. Profile of Purchasing Behaviour of Prospective Consumers50-70 years (don’t buy and don’t use ALTs)More likely to struggle on rather than find solutionLack of perceived needLack of awareness of productsPerception that products are for people older than themselvesNegatively influenced by perceived complexity of productsMost concerned about the stigma of ALTsGood design considered importantDon’t know where to buy ALTsGreater emphasis on getting personal adviceLower prices less importantKeen to see a variety of new models of purchase of ALTs
    42. 42. Profiles of Purchasing Behaviour ofCarer Consumer50-70 years ( buy but don’t use ALTs)Moving safely around home is the main concern for the person they arebuying forNo on else involved in purchase decisionGood design considered importantMost aware of e-ALT, telecare and telehealthAccess to good information and social networksAccess to improved information for others considered importantHighlighted cultural differences in the purchase of ALTsKeen on rental models of ALTs
    43. 43. Profiles of Purchasing Behaviour of Non Purchasing User/Consumer50-70 years ( use but don’t buy ALTs)Hardest group to reach- don’t go out Despite lack of retail experience had string views on what importantDIY & gardening difficult Lower prices more importantHome adaptations most common Negative purchase experiences for ALTsMost pleased with functions of Strong desire to involve those theyproducts care for in purchase decisionFeel confident about deciding which Only group to believe that the stateproduct is right is strong enabler should provide ALTsMost likely to approach council/NHS Least likely to use mobility/specialistfor advice shopDon’t know where to buy ALTs Likely to involve healthcare specialist in purchase decisionLack of access to information and Keen to see a variety of new purchasesocial networks models for ALTs
    44. 44. Factors Effecting Uptake of ALTs
    45. 45. Industry Perspective on Barriers1. Lack of awareness of existence, choice and benefits of ALTs among public, statutory and private sector health and social care providers2. Historical organisations with reluctance to take risks, needing to be convinced of business case3. Insufficient incentives for public and providers to invest time and money into ALT products4. Poor definition of needs of consumers and structure of market place5. Need for market changing products and focus on solutions & services6. Need for better design of ALTs making them discrete, functional and attractive7. Lack of integration of ALTs into everyday environments8. Insufficient focus on strengths of ALTs and opportunities provided by them
    46. 46. Information Needs• Information needs to be: inclusive, realistic, provide enough information to ‘compare and contrast’ different products, available in a variety of locations• Professional recommendations are welcome• Product demonstrations and ‘try before you buy’ schemes are welcomed• People want to trust and rely on products – a product needs to ‘do what it says on the tin’• Information displays should have: clear bullet points, clear visual demonstrations of how the product works• Information with regards guarantees and extended warranties are important• Product reviews from other users are valued
    47. 47. Inclusive Information Provision
    48. 48. ConclusionsThe market for the products, especially universal mainstream ones isthere, but consumer awareness of these types of products is low,Consumers and prospective consumers would like• More opportunities for hands on experience• Money back guarantees• Rental options and lease hire• Good design• Good customer services
    49. 49. Future WorkThe next stage of the project will focus on how we can use theunderstanding from Stage 1•To improve the communication channels between consumers,customers and suppliers•To support the development of a successful market in eALT.
    50. 50. Sponsorship and Further DetailsCOMODAL is led by Coventry University in partnership withAge UK and Grandparents Plus, as part of the Assisted LivingInnovation Platform, funded by the Technology Strategy Board.Further details and project documents may be found at :http://wwwm.coventry.ac.uk/hdti/Research/Pages/Comodal.aspx.
    51. 51. The ChallengeAnna McConnellProduct and Service Design ResearcherEngage Business Network and Brunel University
    52. 52. Desirable FunctionalSimple Usable
    53. 53. The Brief and ProcessDesign a product that increases the enjoyment and/or safety of aneveryday activity DISCOVER Understand your lead users and their needs, behaviour, habits, interests and lifestyles What do your users do, want and need? 45 minutes DELIVER DEFINE DEVELOP
    54. 54. The Brief and ProcessDesign a product that increases the enjoyment and/or safety of aneveryday activity DISCOVER DEFINE Generate a strong, concise problem brief highlighted in the Discover DELIVER Phase. The stronger the brief – the stronger the solution. 20 minutes DEVELOP
    55. 55. The Brief and ProcessDesign a product that increases the enjoyment and/or safety of aneveryday activity DISCOVER DELIVER DEFINE DEVELOP Idea generation and development based on the brief produced in the Define Phase 45 minutes
    56. 56. The Brief and ProcessDesign a product that increases the enjoyment and/or safety of aneveryday activity DISCOVER DELIVER Present the team’s idea, including key DEFINE features and how it solves the problem and challenges. 1hr DEVELOP
    57. 57. The Brief and ProcessDesign a product that increases the enjoyment and/or safety of aneveryday activity DISCOVER Understand your lead users and their needs, behaviour, habits, interests and lifestyles What do your users do, want and need? 45 minutes DEFINE DELIVER Generate a strong, concise problem Present the team’s idea, including key brief highlighted in the Discover features and how it solves the problem Phase. and challenges. The stronger the brief – the 1hr stronger the solution. 20 minutes DEVELOP Idea generation and development based on the brief produced in the Define Phase. 45 minutes
    58. 58. Deliver• The process• Challenges and opportunities• What’s the idea? • And how does it address the needs of your users? What are you taking away from this?
    59. 59. Engage Business NetworkLatest Members:HomebaseTalkTalkBarclaycard Fraud Prevention
    60. 60. Engage Business NetworkResearch and business insight into the 60+ population.Seminars, events and networking opportunities.Product and service accreditation.
    61. 61. Engage Business NetworkDates for your Diary25th OctoberEmployment Forum – a debate with panel membersfrom DWP, TAEN, Asda, Employers Network for Equalityand Inclusion, Irwin Mitchell.November – Date to be ConfirmedLaunch of our Primary Research Report into Market Segmentation andConsumer Behaviour.
    62. 62. Engage Business Network“The Wireless”Advertising OpportunitiesA radio station aimed at “grown-ups”DAB Digital launch 24th SeptemberReach a growing number of listeners through our website (4 million visitors peryear), 450 shops across the UK (30 million transactions) and now DAB Digitalradio in London and Yorkshire (potential 1.6 million 55+ audience)Yet another benefit of belonging to the Engage Business Network.

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