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Experiential Workshop September 2013

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Experiential Workshop September 2013

  1. 1. Through Other Eyes An Experiential Training Workshop Thursday 19th September 2013 Tavis Suite 1-6 Tavistock Square London WC1H 9NA
  2. 2. Through Other Eyes Agenda – Morning Workshop 09:30 Ian Rutter, Senior Manager- Engage Business Network; Welcome 09:45 Caroline Hayden-Wright- Age UK Training; Workshop Briefing and Preparation. 10:15 ‘Though Other Eyes’ experience, which includes a short walk to Waterstones Gower Street 11:35 Refreshments 11:45 Debrief and Plenary; contextualising the learning experience 12:45 Lunch for both the morning and afternoon workshop sessions 13:30 Close Refreshments and Lunch very kindly provided by Waitrose
  3. 3. Through Other Eyes Ian Rutter Senior Manager, Engage Business Network
  4. 4. Introduction • Over 30 per cent of the UK population are above the age of 50 and they hold 80 per cent of the wealth in the country; • There are currently more people above the age of 60 than under 18; • By 2083 one in three people will be over 60; • Since 2010, spend for households that include an individual aged over 65 has risen from £109 billion to £120 billion per year. • Social role changes, physical and mental abilities, and occupational changes amplify the diversity of older people in many different ways.
  5. 5. Introduction • "Over 60% of respondents would visit the High Street more often if it presented more opportunities for social interactions." • "Going shopping is a leisure activity for 1 in 3 participants." • "54% of participants' shopping trips last one to two hours.“ Ageing Consumers: Lifestyle and Preferences in the current marketplace, 2012. Age UK
  6. 6. Introduction • Twenty-three percent of people aged 65 and over have difficulty accessing a bus stop and 25% have problems finding a seat on buses and standing up for long periods of time • Furthermore, carrying goods can be difficult: 41% of older people have difficulty carrying their shopping home. • These mobility difficulties can influence switching loyalty between stores of a given type. Older people who find it difficult to get to large out-of- town supermarkets are likely to use local corner shops Food Shopping in Later Life, 2012. Age UK
  7. 7. Introduction • Once in-store, older people may have difficulty with poor store layout, particularly narrow aisles and poor shelf signposting, shelves that are too high or low, a lack of adequate rest and toilet facilities • In larger stores older people reported having some difficulty in finding a member of staff that is willing to help them. As a result, groceries may be purchased at an outlet with a higher level of service quality in comparison to other retailers even if prices are higher • Many people did not like to ask staff for help but when they did their experience with staff helpfulness varied. • Over a third of people aged 65 and over live alone (3.7 million people), and half of everybody aged 75 and over, compared to 16 per cent of all adults Food Shopping in Later Life, 2012. Age UK
  8. 8. Introduction • Many older adults find there is too much packaging on products, with the majority (65%) finding it hard to open their purchases. Opening jars and tins is particularly problematic with ‘easy-open’ products often being more expensive • Shopping on-line has become commonplace but 41 per cent of people aged 65 to 74 and 72% of those aged 75 plus have never used the internet • The cost of equipment and internet charges may be prohibitive for some older people while problems with poor eyesight and arthritis or other dexterity problems also play a part. Food Shopping in Later Life, 2012. Age UK
  9. 9. Ageing Society : Design Challenges Physical Cognitive Economic Social / Emotional Reduced: • Mobility • Sight • Hearing • Dexterity • Touch Decline in • Memory • Information processing • Numeracy skills • Changes to income & spending patterns • Income value erodes over time • Diminished access to social networks • Changes in emotional needs / responses
  10. 10. Through Other Eyes An Experiential Training Workshop Caroline Hayden-Wright
  11. 11. Key points of workshop • Participative workshop to increase understanding and empathy of impact of ageing • Age UK Team will be on hand at all times to provide support and guidance • Empathy tools will be applied prior to undertaking practical exercise of walking outside and experiencing retail environment • De-brief following exercise with opportunity for sharing and discussion • Reflection on relevance to business area
  12. 12. Human Ageing UNIVERSAL - everyone ages PROGRESSIVE - we cannot stop the process INTRINSIC - it is irreversible / cannot be corrected We will never be younger than we are today
  13. 13. Not a Homogenous Group • Ageing is an individual experience; people age in different ways • People’s response to and ability to cope with the ageing process, differs greatly
  14. 14. Biological Ageing – how do we age? HAIR HEARING BONES SKIN / TOUCH MUSCLE NERVOUS SYSTEM URINARY STYSTEM VISION SMELL / TASTE RESPIRATORY CARDIOVASCULAR GASTROINTESTINAL IMMUNE SYSTEM REPRODUCTIVE
  15. 15. Through Other Eyes Aspects of Natural Ageing Sensory Physical Cognitive Vision Locomotion Reach & Stretch Dexterity Intellectual Functioning Communication Hearing Touch Through Other Eyes
  16. 16. Cataract 13.7% Macular Degeneration 16.7% Glaucoma 5% Diabetic Retinopathy 3% Normal Vision 61.6% Source: www.nei.nih.goc/sims/sims/htm Vision – 4 Common Disorders in Later Life
  17. 17. De – Brief Session Strongest Impression / emotion? Hardest part? WHY? What "limited" you the most? What “helped”? HOW?
  18. 18. • something you would like changed • why do you want to change this? • what steps might progress this? Inclusive Approaches
  19. 19. CANCEL Clear ENTER Cancel Enter Colour Contrast
  20. 20. Improving Visual Packaging
  21. 21. Inclusive Design & Capability Source Benkztin & Juhlins, inclusive design: design for the whole population (2003) Disabled Reduced Capability Fully Capable Inclusive Design: “Design of mainstream products and/or services that are accessible to, and usable by, people with the widest range of abilities within the widest range of situations without the need for special adaptation or design” British Standard 7000 – 6: 2005
  22. 22.  Know the opportunities & challenges demographic change presents to providers of products & services  Recognise a range of physical & sensory changes that affect the capability of people in later life  Identify practical solutions for improving product & service provision for the ageing consumer marketplace Outcomes
  23. 23. Through Other Eyes An Experiential Training Workshop Thursday 19th September 2013 Tavis Suite 1-6 Tavistock Square London WC1H 9NA
  24. 24. Through Other Eyes Agenda – Afternoon Workshop 13:30 Ian Rutter, Senior Manager- Engage Business Network; Welcome 13:45 Caroline Hayden-Wright - Age UK Training; Workshop Briefing and Preparation 14:15 ‘Though Other Eyes’ experience, which includes a short walk to Waterstones Gower Street 15:35 Refreshments 15:45 Debrief and Plenary; contextualising the learning experience 16:45 Close Refreshments and Lunch very kindly provided by Waitrose
  25. 25. Through Other Eyes Ian Rutter Senior Manager, Engage Business Network
  26. 26. Introduction • Over 30 per cent of the UK population are above the age of 50 and they hold 80 per cent of the wealth in the country; • There are currently more people above the age of 60 than under 18; • By 2083 one in three people will be over 60; • Since 2010, spend for households that include an individual aged over 65 has risen from £109 billion to £120 billion per year. • Social role changes, physical and mental abilities, and occupational changes amplify the diversity of older people in many different ways.
  27. 27. Introduction • "Over 60% of respondents would visit the High Street more often if it presented more opportunities for social interactions." • "Going shopping is a leisure activity for 1 in 3 participants." • "54% of participants' shopping trips last one to two hours.“ Ageing Consumers: Lifestyle and Preferences in the current marketplace, 2012. Age UK
  28. 28. Introduction • Twenty-three percent of people aged 65 and over have difficulty accessing a bus stop and 25% have problems finding a seat on buses and standing up for long periods of time • Furthermore, carrying goods can be difficult: 41% of older people have difficulty carrying their shopping home. • These mobility difficulties can influence switching loyalty between stores of a given type. Older people who find it difficult to get to large out-of- town supermarkets are likely to use local corner shops Food Shopping in Later Life, 2012. Age UK
  29. 29. Introduction • Once in-store, older people may have difficulty with poor store layout, particularly narrow aisles and poor shelf signposting, shelves that are too high or low, a lack of adequate rest and toilet facilities • In larger stores older people reported having some difficulty in finding a member of staff that is willing to help them. As a result, groceries may be purchased at an outlet with a higher level of service quality in comparison to other retailers even if prices are higher • Many people did not like to ask staff for help but when they did their experience with staff helpfulness varied. • Over a third of people aged 65 and over live alone (3.7 million people), and half of everybody aged 75 and over, compared to 16 per cent of all adults Food Shopping in Later Life, 2012. Age UK
  30. 30. Introduction • Many older adults find there is too much packaging on products, with the majority (65%) finding it hard to open their purchases. Opening jars and tins is particularly problematic with ‘easy-open’ products often being more expensive • Shopping on-line has become commonplace but 41 per cent of people aged 65 to 74 and 72% of those aged 75 plus have never used the internet • The cost of equipment and internet charges may be prohibitive for some older people while problems with poor eyesight and arthritis or other dexterity problems also play a part. Food Shopping in Later Life, 2012. Age UK
  31. 31. Ageing Society : Design Challenges Physical Cognitive Economic Social / Emotional Reduced: • Mobility • Sight • Hearing • Dexterity • Touch Decline in • Memory • Information processing • Numeracy skills • Changes to income & spending patterns • Income value erodes over time • Diminished access to social networks • Changes in emotional needs / responses
  32. 32. Through Other Eyes An Experiential Training Workshop Caroline Hayden-Wright
  33. 33. Key points of workshop • Participative workshop to increase understanding and empathy of impact of ageing • Age UK Team will be on hand at all times to provide support and guidance • Empathy tools will be applied prior to undertaking practical exercise of walking outside and experiencing retail environment • De-brief following exercise with opportunity for sharing and discussion • Reflection on relevance to business area
  34. 34. Human Ageing UNIVERSAL - everyone ages PROGRESSIVE - we cannot stop the process INTRINSIC - it is irreversible / cannot be corrected we will never be younger than we are today
  35. 35. Not a Homogenous Group • Ageing is an individual experience; people age in different ways • People’s response to and ability to cope with the ageing process, differs greatly
  36. 36. Biological Ageing – how do we age? HAIR HEARING BONES SKIN / TOUCH MUSCLE NERVOUS SYSTEM URINARY STYSTEM VISION SMELL / TASTE RESPIRATORY CARDIOVASCULAR GASTROINTESTINAL IMMUNE SYSTEM REPRODUCTIVE
  37. 37. Through Other Eyes Aspects of Natural Ageing Sensory Physical Cognitive Vision Locomotion Reach & Stretch Dexterity Intellectual Functioning Communication Hearing Touch Through Other Eyes
  38. 38. Cataract 13.7% Macular Degeneration 16.7% Glaucoma 5% Diabetic Retinopathy 3% Normal Vision 61.6% Source: www.nei.nih.goc/sims/sims/htm Vision – 4 Common Disorders in Later Life
  39. 39. De – Brief Session Strongest Impression / emotion? Hardest part? WHY? What "limited" you the most? What “helped”? HOW?
  40. 40. • something you would like changed • why do you want to change this? • what steps might progress this? Inclusive Approaches
  41. 41. CANCEL Clear ENTER Cancel Enter Colour Contrast
  42. 42. Improving Visual Packaging
  43. 43. Inclusive Design & Capability Source Benkztin & Juhlins, inclusive design: design for the whole population (2003) Disabled Reduced Capability Fully Capable Inclusive Design: “Design of mainstream products and/or services that are accessible to, and usable by, people with the widest range of abilities within the widest range of situations without the need for special adaptation or design” British Standard 7000 – 6: 2005
  44. 44.  Know the opportunities & challenges demographic change presents to providers of products & services  Recognise a range of physical & sensory changes that affect the capability of people in later life  Identify practical solutions for improving product & service provision for the ageing consumer marketplace Outcomes

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