Optics presentation

291 views

Published on

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
291
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Optics presentation

  1. 1. Stretching DNA with Optical Lasers M.D. Wang, H. Yin, R. Landick, J. Gelles, S.M. Block Biophysical Journal Volume 72, Issue 3, March 1997, Pages 1335–1346
  2. 2. Why do we want to stretch DNA? ­ Elasticity and mechanical flexibility of DNA is an  important factor in cellular functions ­ Researchers sought to gather data for comparison to  several preexisting models for the elasticity and  flexibility of organic polymers
  3. 3. Why optical tweezers? ­ Optical tweezers are one of the only options for  researchs who want to reproducibly manipulate  delicate matter on the scale of DNA strands. ­ Forces applied are in the picoNewton range (~.1 – 50  pN) ­ Position is monitored with a minimum resolution of 1  nanometer
  4. 4. How do optical tweezers achieve this?
  5. 5. Refracted photons are accelerated, causing the “trapped”  particle to experience a force.
  6. 6. Similarly, reflected photons also cause the particle to  experience a force.
  7. 7. Total forces for a particle in the center of the trap will sum to  zero.
  8. 8. As the particle strays from the center of the trap, the magnitude  of the individual vectors changes, and no longer neccesarily  sum to zero.
  9. 9. Hooke's Law ­ In many cases (but not all) the restorative force imparted by the  laser can be modeled with good using Hooke's law: F(x) = kx where the laser is incident parallel to the y­axis. ­ In this model k is no longer a “spring constant” but is a  function of the intensity of the laser and optical properties of the  particle being trapped. It is common to refer to the “stiffness” of  an optical trap.
  10. 10. Some important points: ­ It is possible to trap asymetric particles with the tweezers (ex. DNA  molecules), but spherical particles and the resulting symmetry of the  forces experienced is optimal.  ­ Trapped particles are usually dielectrics. ­ To work with in these limitations, the end of a strand of DNA is  attached to a polystyrene particle. The other end of the strand is  then attached to a moveable glass stage via RNA polymerase.
  11. 11. Controlling position: ­ Piezo stages are used to  alter and monitor the  stretch of each DNA  strand with sufficient  resolution. ­ Displacement in x is a  function of input voltage.  Similar in concept to a  solenoid, but with far  greater resolution.
  12. 12. Monitoring position:
  13. 13. Monitoring position:
  14. 14. AOM and Position Detector operation ­ The position detector send two output voltages,  one  each for the x and y axis, to the AOM unit. ­ The AOM unit then adjusts the laser's voltage in  accordance with the total displacement of the  trapped  particle. Voltage is increased until total displacement  falls to zero.
  15. 15. Using the data ­ Researchers can track the force experienced by  particle  at any given displacement, as it is a function of the  laser's intensity. ­ Comparing the force needed to keep the partice in the  trap as the piezo stage stretches the DNA, researchers  are able to calculate the elasticity.
  16. 16. Results
  17. 17. Sources: - M.D. Wang, H. Yin, R. Landick, J. Gelles, S.M. Block. “Stretching DNA with Optical Tweezers”, Biophysical Journal. Volume 72, Issue 3, March 1997  - Steve Wasserman, Steven Nagel. “An Introduction to Optical Trapping”, http://scripts.mit.edu/~20.309/wiki/index.php? title=Optical_trap, MIT Bioinstrumentation Teaching Lab. October 8, 2013

×