Charisma Enigma

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  • Charisma Enigma

    1. 1. The Charisma ENIGMA ENIGMA ENIGMA
    2. 2. Five Presidents in Times of Crisis
    3. 3. THE BARBARIAN PRESIDENT Wall Street Lawyer George Templeton Strong called Lincoln, a “barbarian” and a “yahoo” after their first meeting
    4. 4. THE BARBARIAN PRESIDENT Least popular president ever
    5. 5. THE BARBARIAN PRESIDENT quot;We have a President without brains.” –George Bancroft, Leading American Historian
    6. 6. THE BARBARIAN PRESIDENT quot;Who will write this ignorant man's state papers?quot; –Newspaper Editor
    7. 7. THE BARBARIAN PRESIDENT “THE HOMELIEST MAN I EVER SAW” –DONN PLATT ONE ENGLISHMAN LABELED HIS APPEARANCE “GROTESQUE.”
    8. 8. Lincoln was also noted as having a high and squeaky speaking voice with a strong Kentucky accent. This recording is an example of the Kentucky accent.
    9. 9. Lincoln was also noted as having a high and squeaky speaking voice with a strong Kentucky accent. This recording is an example of the Kentucky accent.
    10. 10. “ When Lincoln rose to speak, I was greatly disappointed. He was tall, tall-–oh, how tall! and so angular and awkward that I had, for an instant, a feeling of pity for so ungainly a man. He began in a low tone of voice, as if he were used to speaking out of doors and was afraid of speaking too loud... An Eyewitness Account of Lincoln’s Cooper Union Address
    11. 11. “ [But pretty soon] his face lighted up as with an inward fire; the whole man was transfigured. I forgot his clothes, his personal appearance, and his individual peculiarities. Presently, forgetting myself, I was on my feet like the rest, yelling like a wild Indian, cheering this wonderful man... An Eyewitness Account of Lincoln’s Cooper Union Address
    12. 12. “ In the close parts of his argument you could hear the gentle sizzling of the gas burners. When he reached a climax the thunders of applause were terrific. It was a great speech. When I came out of the hall my face was glowing with excitement and my frame all a- quiver. A friend, with his eyes aglow asked me what I thought of ‘Abe’ Lincoln, the rail-splitter. I said, ‘He’s the greatest man since St. Paul.’ An Eyewitness Account of Lincoln’s Cooper Union Address
    13. 13. Gettysburg: Edward Everett
    14. 14. Gettysburg: Edward Everett • Edward Everett, one of the premiere orators of the age, was the keynote speaker at Gettysburg.
    15. 15. Gettysburg: Edward Everett • Edward Everett, one of the premiere orators of the age, was the keynote speaker at Gettysburg. • He spoke for over two hours in the typical rhetorical style of the day.
    16. 16. Gettysburg: “ Edward Everett Standing beneath this serene sky, overlooking these broad fields now reposing from the labors of the waning year, the mighty Alleghenies dimly towering before us, the graves of our brethren beneath our feet, it is with hesitation that I raise my poor voice to break the eloquent silence of God and Nature. But the duty to which you have called me must be performed; — grant me, I pray you, your indulgence and your sympathy... –Everett’s introduction to his two hour speech at Gettysburg
    17. 17. Lincoln at Gettysburg Lincoln spoke for under three minutes––so short a time the photographer only managed this one exposure.
    18. 18. Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, read by Sam Waterston
    19. 19. Lincoln’s Style
    20. 20. Lincoln’s Style Self-written and meticulously self-researched
    21. 21. Lincoln’s Style Self-written and meticulously self-researched Total absence of metaphorical embroidery
    22. 22. Lincoln’s Style Self-written and meticulously self-researched Total absence of metaphorical embroidery Lack of “pyrotechnics” typical of stump speakers
    23. 23. Lincoln’s Style Self-written and meticulously self-researched Total absence of metaphorical embroidery Lack of “pyrotechnics” typical of stump speakers Short, simple, and geared toward accuracy
    24. 24. Excerpt from Lincoln’s “ Second Inaugural Address Neither party expected for the war the magnitude or the duration which it has already attained. Neither anticipated that the cause of the conflict might cease with or even before the conflict itself should cease. Each looked for an easier triumph, and a result less fundamental and astounding. Both read the same Bible and pray to the same God, and each invokes His aid against the other. It may seem strange that any men should dare to ask a just God's assistance in wringing their bread from the sweat of other men's faces, but let us judge not, that we be not judged...
    25. 25. The prayers of both could not be answered. That of “ neither has been answered fully. The Almighty has His own purposes. quot;Woe unto the world because of offenses; for it must needs be that offenses come, but woe to that man by whom the offense cometh.quot; If we shall suppose that American slavery is one of those offenses which, in the providence of God, must needs come, but which, having continued through His appointed time, He now wills to remove, and that He gives to both North and South this terrible war as the woe due to those by whom the offense came, shall we discern therein any departure from those divine attributes which the believers in a living God always ascribe to Him?
    26. 26. “ Fondly do we hope, fervently do we pray, that this mighty scourge of war may speedily pass away. Yet, if God wills that it continue until all the wealth piled by the bondsman's two hundred and fifty years of unrequited toil shall be sunk, and until every drop of blood drawn with the lash shall be paid by another drawn with the sword, as was said three thousand years ago, so still it must be said quot;the judgments of the Lord are true and righteous altogether.
    27. 27. “ With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in, to bind up the nation's wounds, to care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow and his orphan, to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations.
    28. 28. 1933 The Great Depression Hoover Roosevelt
    29. 29. The Little Remembered Hoover Contrary to popular remembrance, Hoover was:
    30. 30. The Little Remembered Hoover Contrary to popular remembrance, Hoover was: A remarkable entrepreneur
    31. 31. The Little Remembered Hoover Contrary to popular remembrance, Hoover was: A remarkable entrepreneur A humanitarian
    32. 32. The Little Remembered Hoover Contrary to popular remembrance, Hoover was: A remarkable entrepreneur A humanitarian Highly popular before the economic collapse
    33. 33. The Little Remembered Hoover Contrary to popular remembrance, Hoover was: A remarkable entrepreneur A humanitarian Highly popular before the economic collapse An innovative problem solver
    34. 34. The Speaking Style of Hoover
    35. 35. The Speaking Style of Hoover Terrible speech writer
    36. 36. The Speaking Style of Hoover Terrible speech writer Halting style and technical language
    37. 37. The Speaking Style of Hoover Terrible speech writer Halting style and technical language Monotone voice
    38. 38. The Speaking Style of Hoover Terrible speech writer Halting style and technical language Monotone voice Flopped on emerging technologies like radio & film
    39. 39. The Speaking Style of Hoover Terrible speech writer Halting style and technical language Monotone voice Flopped on emerging technologies like radio & film Failed to express sympathy or explain the crisis in simple terms
    40. 40. Herbert Hoover speaking on Washington’s legislative efforts during the crisis
    41. 41. Herbert Hoover urging Americans to the polls on Election Day
    42. 42. Compare this to Roosevelt’s first radio “fireside chat” on March 13, 1933, during a banking crisis caused by collapsing public confidence...
    43. 43. FDR The Fireside Chats of
    44. 44. FDR The Fireside Chats of “Fireside chats” leveraged radio, allowing him to speak personally with Americans
    45. 45. FDR The Fireside Chats of “Fireside chats” leveraged radio, allowing him to speak personally with Americans He gave thirty of these radio broadcasts during his three terms as president
    46. 46. FDR The Fireside Chats of “Fireside chats” leveraged radio, allowing him to speak personally with Americans He gave thirty of these radio broadcasts during his three terms as president They often began, “Good evening, friends...”
    47. 47. FDR The Fireside Chats of “ ...I never saw him–– But I knew him. Can you have forgotten How, with his voice, he came into our house, The President of the United States, Calling us friends…” –Carl Lamson Carmer American Poet
    48. 48. FDR The Personal Appeal of “ Franklin Roosevelt was nothing if he was not attractive: big, handsome, genial, gregarious, outgoing, always grinning, always on the move. Compared to the aloof and dour Hoover, Roosevelt seemed like a breath of fresh air; he was so robust, so vital, so confident and optimistic, so warm and lighthearted, so utterly charming. –Buhite & Levy Authors of FDR’s Fireside Chats
    49. 49. FDR The Speaking Style of
    50. 50. FDR The Speaking Style of Simple explanations but not condescending
    51. 51. FDR The Speaking Style of Simple explanations but not condescending Encouraging, even flattering
    52. 52. FDR The Speaking Style of Simple explanations but not condescending Encouraging, even flattering Relentlessly positive
    53. 53. FDR The Speaking Style of Simple explanations but not condescending Encouraging, even flattering Relentlessly positive Strong clear voice with good inflection
    54. 54. FDR The Speaking Style of Simple explanations but not condescending Encouraging, even flattering Relentlessly positive Strong clear voice with good inflection Conversational language
    55. 55. Roosevelt’s speech to Congress, one day after the unprovoked Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. December 8, 1941
    56. 56. bush in the wake of 9/11
    57. 57. bush in the wake of 9/11 Pre-9/11 his popularity was at its lowest point since taking office
    58. 58. bush in the wake of 9/11 Pre-9/11 his popularity was at its lowest point since taking office Following his speeches on 9/11 and at Ground Zero days later, he had a 90% approval rating
    59. 59. bush in the wake of 9/11 Pre-9/11 his popularity was at its lowest point since taking office Following his speeches on 9/11 and at Ground Zero days later, he had a 90% approval rating His ratings diminished, but stayed high for the next several years
    60. 60. George W. Bush’s speech following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001
    61. 61. George W. Bush at Ground Zero September 14, 2001
    62. 62. The Speaking Style of REAGAN Referred to as “The Chief Comforter” and “The Great Communicator.” Encouraged and comforted the public in his speeches Spoke glowingly of America as the greatest force for good in the world
    63. 63. Reagan’s speech regarding Communism’s “evil empire,” given at a meeting of the National Association of Evangelicals. At this time, his approval rating was at an all-time low of 35%. March 8, 1983
    64. 64. Reagan’s speech at the Berlin Wall Brandenburg Gate June 12, 1987.
    65. 65. Thank you!

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