GREEN CHEMISTRY
The Chemical Industries' Way to Go
Green
A Presentation by:
Tariq Hashmat Tauheed Omar Ahmed Siddiqui
IInd year
IInd year
B.Tech. Electronics
B.Tech Mechanical Eng...
INTRODUCTION
One of the most widely accepted definition
of green chemistry is the one given by the
man who coined the term...
O Paul Anastas is known as the 'Father of Green

Chemistry' for his groundbreaking work on the
design and manufacture of n...
O Green Chemistry is all about

REDUCTIONS. These reductions lead
to what is known as "Triple Bottom Line
Benefits", a com...
GREEN CHEMISTRY IS ABOUT..
Waste
Materials
Hazard
Risk

Energy
Environmental
Impact

COST
“It is better to prevent waste
than to treat or clean
up waste after it is formed”

Chemical
Process
O Costs saved by

-reduction of expensive-to-dispose
waste, and energy use,
-making processes more efficient
reducing mate...
Ecological aspects of the Natural Step Systems
PRINCIPLES OF GREEN
CHEMISTRY
Paul Anastas and James Warner together
chalked down twelve principles of Green
Chemistry to ...
2. Atom Economy
Synthetic methods should be designed to
maximize the incorporation of all materials used in
the process in...
5. Safer Solvents and Auxiliaries

The use of auxiliary substances (e.g.,
solvents, separation agents, etc.) should
be mad...
7. Use of Renewable Feedstocks

A raw material or feedstock should be
renewable rather than depleting
whenever technically...
9. Catalysis

Catalytic reagents (as selective as possible)
are superior to stoichiometric reagents.

10. Design for Degra...
11. Real-time analysis for Pollution
Prevention

Analytical methodologies need to be
further developed to allow for real-t...
THE DRIVERS OF GREEN CHEMISTRY
Economic benefit
Lower
capital investment

Lower
operating costs

Societal pressure

Govern...
TOWARDS THE GOAL OF GREEN
CHEMISTRY

There is a certain group of technologies or pool of technologies
most widely used or ...
THE BIG PICTURE
Practical approaches

Operational tools

Green
chemistry

Strategic goal
Sustainable
development

Catalysi...
APPLICATION OF GREEN CHEMISTRY
The application
of Green
Chemistry at
every stage in
the lifecycle of a
product is of a
par...
THE MAJOR USES OF GREEN
CHEMISTRY
O Energy
O Global Change
O Resource Depletion
O Food Supply
O Energy: Green chemistry is essential in

developing alternatives of energy generation
as well as continue the path towar...
O Resource Depletion: Renewable

resources can be made increasingly viable
technologically and economically through
green ...
EXAMPLES OF GREEN CHEMISTRY
O Antifoulants:
Rohm and Haas Company designed Sea-Nine™ replacing
the classical TBTO, which t...
O Oxidation:
Iron based activators TAML™ containing no toxic
group seek to replace chlorine chemistry based
polluting oxid...
CONCLUSIONS
Green chemistry has come a long way since its birth
in 1991, growing from a small grassroots idea into a
new a...
Who knows? Green chemistry may
be the next social movement that
will set aside all the world’s
differences and allow for t...
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Green chemistry – The Chemical Industries' Way To Go Green

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At a time when everyone seems to be concerned about the environment, how exactly would the chemical industries play their part? A sneak peek into the fundamentals of how the chemical industries can adapt, and/or restructure.

We need the earth, the

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Green chemistry – The Chemical Industries' Way To Go Green

  1. 1. GREEN CHEMISTRY The Chemical Industries' Way to Go Green
  2. 2. A Presentation by: Tariq Hashmat Tauheed Omar Ahmed Siddiqui IInd year IInd year B.Tech. Electronics B.Tech Mechanical Engg. Engg. Zakir Husain College of Engineering & Technology ALIGARH MUSLIM UNIVERSITY
  3. 3. INTRODUCTION One of the most widely accepted definition of green chemistry is the one given by the man who coined the term itself, Paul T. Anastas, in the year 1991. O Anastas along with John C. Warner defined Green Chemistry as follows: "Green Chemistry is the design of chemical products and processes that reduce or eliminate the use and/or generation of hazardous
  4. 4. O Paul Anastas is known as the 'Father of Green Chemistry' for his groundbreaking work on the design and manufacture of non-hazardous and environmentally benign chemicals. O 'Green Chemistry' now is a globally accepted term to describe the movement towards more environmentally acceptable chemical processes and products.
  5. 5. O Green Chemistry is all about REDUCTIONS. These reductions lead to what is known as "Triple Bottom Line Benefits", a combination of Environmental, Economic and Social improvements. This encourages businesses of all kinds to go the green way [4].
  6. 6. GREEN CHEMISTRY IS ABOUT.. Waste Materials Hazard Risk Energy Environmental Impact COST
  7. 7. “It is better to prevent waste than to treat or clean up waste after it is formed” Chemical Process
  8. 8. O Costs saved by -reduction of expensive-to-dispose waste, and energy use, -making processes more efficient reducing material consumption. O Reduction in hazardous incidents and handling of dangerous substances = add-on social health benefit
  9. 9. Ecological aspects of the Natural Step Systems
  10. 10. PRINCIPLES OF GREEN CHEMISTRY Paul Anastas and James Warner together chalked down twelve principles of Green Chemistry to aid in assessing how green a chemical process or a product is [1]. 1. Prevention It is better to prevent waste than to treat or clean up waste after it has been created.
  11. 11. 2. Atom Economy Synthetic methods should be designed to maximize the incorporation of all materials used in the process into the final product. 3. Less Hazardous Chemical Syntheses Wherever practicable, synthetic methods should be designed to use and generate substances that possess little or no toxicity to human health and the environment. 4. Designing Safer Chemicals Chemical products should be designed to effect their desired function while minimizing their toxicity.
  12. 12. 5. Safer Solvents and Auxiliaries The use of auxiliary substances (e.g., solvents, separation agents, etc.) should be made unnecessary wherever possible and innocuous when used. 6. Design for Energy Efficiency Energy requirements of chemical processes should be recognized for their environmental and economic impacts and should be minimized. If possible, synthetic methods should be conducted at ambient temperature and pressure.
  13. 13. 7. Use of Renewable Feedstocks A raw material or feedstock should be renewable rather than depleting whenever technically and economically practicable. 8. Reduce Derivatives Unnecessary derivatization (use of blocking groups, protection/ deprotection, temporary modification of physical/chemical processes) should be minimized or avoided if possible, because such steps require additional reagents and can generate waste.
  14. 14. 9. Catalysis Catalytic reagents (as selective as possible) are superior to stoichiometric reagents. 10. Design for Degradation Chemical products should be designed so that at the end of their function they break down into innocuous degradation products and do not persist in the environment.
  15. 15. 11. Real-time analysis for Pollution Prevention Analytical methodologies need to be further developed to allow for real-time, in-process monitoring and control prior to the formation of hazardous substances. 12. Inherently Safer Chemistry for Accident Prevention Substances and the form of a substance used in a chemical process should be chosen to minimize the potential for chemical accidents, including releases, explosions, and fire.
  16. 16. THE DRIVERS OF GREEN CHEMISTRY Economic benefit Lower capital investment Lower operating costs Societal pressure Government legislation Improved public image Safer and smaller plants Pollution control Less hazardous materials Green chemistry High fines for waste Producer responsibility
  17. 17. TOWARDS THE GOAL OF GREEN CHEMISTRY There is a certain group of technologies or pool of technologies most widely used or studied in achieving the goal towards Green Chemistry. The major ones are summarized in the figure
  18. 18. THE BIG PICTURE Practical approaches Operational tools Green chemistry Strategic goal Sustainable development Catalysis Green engineering Waste management Industrial ecology Process intensification Renewable energy Monitoring tools Life-cycle assessment E-factor, atom economy
  19. 19. APPLICATION OF GREEN CHEMISTRY The application of Green Chemistry at every stage in the lifecycle of a product is of a particularly high importance. Going green at each step in lifecycle
  20. 20. THE MAJOR USES OF GREEN CHEMISTRY O Energy O Global Change O Resource Depletion O Food Supply
  21. 21. O Energy: Green chemistry is essential in developing alternatives of energy generation as well as continue the path towards energy efficiency. O Global Change: The concerns for climate change, global distillation, etc. can be addressed through the development and implementation of green chemistry technologies.
  22. 22. O Resource Depletion: Renewable resources can be made increasingly viable technologically and economically through green chemistry. O Food Supply: Green chemistry can address many food supply issues by developing target specific pesticides, fertilizers with maximum effectiveness, etc.
  23. 23. EXAMPLES OF GREEN CHEMISTRY O Antifoulants: Rohm and Haas Company designed Sea-Nine™ replacing the classical TBTO, which though effective, has widespread environmental problems. O Pest Control: EDEN Bioscience Corporation designed “Messenger®”, a non-toxic pest-control product, substituting the contemporary pest control methods.
  24. 24. O Oxidation: Iron based activators TAML™ containing no toxic group seek to replace chlorine chemistry based polluting oxidation techniques. O Degradable Polymers: BASF developed product Savant™ made from nylon-6 can be depolymerized and reused. This came as apart of its “6ix Again®” recycling program, thus making it possible to recycle old nylon upholstery fabric back to virgin grade nylon.
  25. 25. CONCLUSIONS Green chemistry has come a long way since its birth in 1991, growing from a small grassroots idea into a new approach to scientifically-based environmental protection. All over the world, governments and industries are working with „green‟ chemists to transform the economy into a sustainable enterprise.
  26. 26. Who knows? Green chemistry may be the next social movement that will set aside all the world’s differences and allow for the creation of an environmentally commendable civilization.

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