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ACWA Conference Sydney 2018: Giving Voice to Perspectives of Residential Care - Some Reflections on the Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care

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ACWA Conference Sydney 2018: Giving Voice to Perspectives of Residential Care - Some Reflections on the Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care

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The Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care (SJRCC) is a peer-reviewed e-journal that is freely available to all. It aims to provide a rich forum for debate and dissemination about topical issues across Scottish, UK and international residential and related child care research, policy and practice. What marks SJRCC out from most other child welfare journals, is that its primary audience is practitioners, managers, policymakers and social work students. Therefore, alongside peer reviewed articles from researchers, the editors encourage and support contributions from across these groups so that they can share their wide and varied experience of residential care, as well as supporting contributions from young people with experience of the care system. After briefly discussing the SJRCC’s rationale and history, and providing an overview of the material that it publishes, this paper goes on to look at how the Journal engages with those working in residential child care, its role in regional and national policy developments, and lessons learnt over the last 16 years. The paper also challenges attendees to think critically about how they get, process, reflect, and act upon information about residential child care, and, as part of that, the place of books, professional associations, training, supervision, team discussions, informal story-telling, inquiries, news stories, social media…and journals. It will also encourage attendees to think about how they can contribute to knowledge and understanding of residential child care by writing about their own experience.

The Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care (SJRCC) is a peer-reviewed e-journal that is freely available to all. It aims to provide a rich forum for debate and dissemination about topical issues across Scottish, UK and international residential and related child care research, policy and practice. What marks SJRCC out from most other child welfare journals, is that its primary audience is practitioners, managers, policymakers and social work students. Therefore, alongside peer reviewed articles from researchers, the editors encourage and support contributions from across these groups so that they can share their wide and varied experience of residential care, as well as supporting contributions from young people with experience of the care system. After briefly discussing the SJRCC’s rationale and history, and providing an overview of the material that it publishes, this paper goes on to look at how the Journal engages with those working in residential child care, its role in regional and national policy developments, and lessons learnt over the last 16 years. The paper also challenges attendees to think critically about how they get, process, reflect, and act upon information about residential child care, and, as part of that, the place of books, professional associations, training, supervision, team discussions, informal story-telling, inquiries, news stories, social media…and journals. It will also encourage attendees to think about how they can contribute to knowledge and understanding of residential child care by writing about their own experience.

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ACWA Conference Sydney 2018: Giving Voice to Perspectives of Residential Care - Some Reflections on the Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care

  1. 1. Dr Iain Matheson, ResearchCentre for Better Outcomes from Fostering and ResidentialCare, New Zealand (SJRCC Editorial Board Member) Andrew Kendrick, Emeritus Professor of ResidentialChild Care, School of SocialWork and Social Policy, University of Strathclyde, Scotland (SJRCC Founding and Emeritus Editor)
  2. 2. 2.5 million ‘scholarly’ journal articles published annually Child welfare titles include:  Child Abuse and Neglect  Child and Family SocialWork  Child andYouth Services Review  Developing Practice. 5 companies account for 50% of all such articles
  3. 3. The aim of the Scottish Institute of Residential Child Care, is to ensure that residential child care staff throughout Scotland have access to the skills and knowledge they require to meet the needs of the children and young people in their care (Kendrick, 2002).
  4. 4.  Launched 2002  Professional journal  Residential care/OOHC  Peer reviewed  3 issues annually  Long & short articles  Editorial board – 2 international members  Online since 2013 – free access
  5. 5. SJRCC aims to provide a rich forum for debate and dissemination about topical issues across Scottish, UK and international residential and related child care research, policy and practice.
  6. 6.  Research articles  Commentaries and opinion pieces  Policy, programme and training articles  Annual Kilbrandon lecture  Book reviews  Editorials
  7. 7.  OOHC sector leaders  OOHC educators & researchers  MSc/PhD students  OOHC professionals – both experienced & inexperienced writers  Care experienced adults  Other international voices
  8. 8. 52,687 unique visitors since 2013 Page views by country 1. UK 2. Republic of Ireland 3. Canada 4. Australia 5. United States
  9. 9.  Access is everything!  Working with inexperienced writers  Special issues  Including shorter articles  Globalisation
  10. 10.  Journals  Books & reports  Training  Conferences & talks  Supervision  TV/Radio/Newspaper  Online stories  Social media  Collegial discussions  Advocacy groups
  11. 11.  How do you keep up to date?  How do you contribute to the learning of others?
  12. 12. Thanks For a copy of the presentation, to be added to my Australasian email list, or to contact me, please email iain@mathesonassociates.co.nz

Editor's Notes

  • with half of all journals being published by five for-profit companies although there are over 2,000 publishers, as of 2013, five for-profit companies (Reed Elsevier, Springer Science+Business Media, Wiley-Blackwell, Taylor & Francis, and Sage) accounted for 50% of articles published
  • Professor Claire Cameron, University College London and Professor Robbie Gilligan, Trinity College Dublin
  • look at how the Journal engages with those working in residential child care, its role in regional and national policy developments, and lessons
  • What Works in Residential Care: Making it Work (Lesley Archer, University of York)
  • Phil Mendes Australia
  • How do you Get, Process, Reflect, and Act upon
    Journals
    Books
    Reports
    Research
    Training
    Qualifications
    Professional associations
    Conferences
    Supervision
    TV/Radio/Newspaper stories
    Website stories
    Social media
    Collegial/team discussions
    Talks
    Advocacy/ Campaigning Groups
  • ×