Requirements Maturity Model Overview

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An overview presentation of the IAG Requirements Maturity Model with description of the key capability areas and characteristics of the maturity levels.

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Requirements Maturity Model Overview

  1. 1. REQUIREMENTSMANAGEMENTMATURITY<br />Overview of the Maturity Model<br />
  2. 2. Maturity Levels<br />
  3. 3. Project Performance by Maturity<br />On-time, On-budget, Meeting Requirements and Objectives <br /><ul><li>Key Differences from Level One to Level Four Organizations:
  4. 4. On budget: 41% vs 81%
  5. 5. On time: 32% vs 82%</li></ul>(a capable and fully institutionalized requirements practice)<br />(undefined, informal requirements practice)<br />from 2009 IAG BA Benchmark Survey. N=437<br />
  6. 6. Requirements Performance by Maturity<br />Projects Delivering Expected Functional Requirements<br /><ul><li>54% of projects deliver all required functionality in Level One organizations vs. Level Four organizations where over 90% met functional requirements </li></ul>% of projects meeting functional requirements<br />% of missed requirements*<br />from 2009 IAG BA Benchmark Survey. N=437<br />* Of those projects that do not deliver 100% of expected requirements<br />
  7. 7. Requirements Expenditure by Maturity Level<br />Actual Spend on Requirements Definition and Management<br /><ul><li>BA Benchmark Study shows a direct correlation between the amount of effort applied to requirements discovery and management, and the overall maturity of organizations.
  8. 8. Higher maturity companies dedicate more effort to ensuring that requirements are right versus their low requirements maturity counterparts. </li></ul>% of project budget spent on requirements<br />from 2009 IAG BA Benchmark Survey. N=437<br />
  9. 9. Requirements Effort by Maturity Level<br />Actual Weeks Spent on Requirements Definition and Management<br /><ul><li>2009 BA Benchmark study showed that the average $1 million project required twelve and nineteen weeks to prepare requirements.
  10. 10. IAG believes this is too long and is the direct result of sub-optimal processes. </li></ul>Average weeks spent (per $1M project) on requirements definition*<br />from 2009 IAG BA Benchmark Survey. N=437<br />
  11. 11. Cost of Poor Requirements by Maturity Level<br />% of Development Budget consumed by poor requirements practices<br /><ul><li>On average, poor Requirements Practice wastes 34% of an organization’s IT budget.
  12. 12. An organization at Level 2 can cut waste by ¼ by improving their requirements maturity to Level 3 </li></ul>from 2009 IAG BA Benchmark Survey. N=437<br />
  13. 13. Requirements Maturity Model<br />
  14. 14. The Requirement Management Maturity Levels<br />Level 0: Incomplete<br />Characteristics<br />No defined requirements process, practices <br />No standardized templates for requirements deliverables<br />No specialized requirements software tools used<br />No Business Analyst position<br />At this level, the practice of business analysis essentially does not exist. Requirements definition is not regarded as a necessary activity in the project management or application management lifecycles. Some areas may have some capable individuals involved in some requirements definition; however, it is generally unsupported.<br />
  15. 15. The Requirement Management Maturity Levels<br />Level 1: Performed<br />Ad-Hoc <br />Characteristics<br />Informal requirements process often reliant on related standards <br />Practices applied are based on individual skill and choice <br />No defined requirements process, practices<br />No standardized templates for requirements deliverables<br />No specialized requirements software tools used<br />Requirement activities are not defined across the organization, resulting in unpredictable, poorly controlled and inconsistent results There may be areas within the organization use industry or locally developed best practices, but there is no organizational direction and oversight. <br />
  16. 16. The Requirement Management Maturity Levels<br />Level 2: Defined<br />Individual-Centric <br />Characteristics<br />All critical requirements activities are defined<br />Select activities and standards (e.g., in elicitation and definition) being implemented<br />Inconsistent use of process, techniques, technology and documentation standards<br />Inconsistent results<br />Focused on communication, training and development activities to lead to Level 3<br />At this level, formal definitions for the business analysis practice are introduced along with the provision of select standards. Although requirement activities are defined, and may be fully understood, there is little consistency above a team or project level.<br />
  17. 17. The Requirement Management Maturity Levels<br />Level 3: Implemented<br />Consistent <br />Characteristics<br /><ul><li>All processes and practices well defined with clear standards and workflow guidelines.
  18. 18. Process and documentation standards mandated and managed through governance process
  19. 19. Formal organizational infrastructure
  20. 20. Requirements Management Office or Center of Excellence, etc.
  21. 21. More consistent and improved results
  22. 22. Focused shifts to institutionalization of standards through measurement and management activities</li></ul>At this level, the business analysis practice is refined and begins to be integrated with application and project management lifecycles. Standard deliverables are produced, often with the support of requirements software tools. Practices and deliverable standards are managed centrally and routinely audited.<br />
  23. 23. The Requirement Management Maturity Levels<br />Level 4: Institutionalized<br />Becoming Part of the ALM Culture <br />Characteristics<br /><ul><li>Results routinely measured through a balanced scorecard framework
  24. 24. All requirements-related processes, practices and standards are integrated within project, product and application management workflows
  25. 25. Processes universally followed according to defined guidelines and standards
  26. 26. Practitioners fully trained and qualified
  27. 27. Achieving consistent, Tier 4 results¹</li></ul>Business analysis, requirements definition and management are recognized as essential value added capabilities in the application, product and project management lifecycles. <br />¹Target balanced scorecard measures for Level 4 organization<br />
  28. 28. The Requirement Management Maturity Levels<br />Level 5: Optimized<br />Adaptive <br />Characteristics<br /><ul><li>Focused on
  29. 29. Process optimization
  30. 30. Advanced capabilities
  31. 31. Innovations and extensions
  32. 32. Evaluation and implementation of enhanced, advanced and/or emerging processes, methods, and technologies
  33. 33. Organization is able to adapt to quickly and easily adapt to changes or advancements in business, products or IT</li></ul>The requirements organization is continually improving its processes, technology and people. Performance is measured, managed and optimized. Various continuous improvement, business process management and performance management systems are in place to manage and optimize how requirements are defined, managed and used to achieve the organization’s business objectives.<br />
  34. 34. The Capability Areas<br />Multiple Capability Areas<br />Six Dimensions of Requirements Management Maturity <br />
  35. 35. The Capability Areas<br />Process<br />Integration and management of the requirements lifecycle <br />The level of definition, implementation, integration and management of the requirements lifecycle. <br />Planning, elicitation, definition, analysis, change management and implementation<br />May be applicable to multiple methodologies and/or development approaches<br />The mature requirements organization follows a well defined requirements process (or processes) with clear standards and task definitions that are integrated with other practice areas throughout the organization, are consistently followed, and are measured, management and continuously improved upon. <br />
  36. 36. The Capability Areas<br />Process<br />Integration and management of the requirements lifecycle <br />
  37. 37. The Capability Areas<br />Practices<br />Requirements Practices & Techniques<br />The definition and management of the various requirements practices and techniques. e.g., <br />use-case modeling, <br />facilitating requirements discovery sessions, <br />writing user stories, <br />data modeling, <br />burn down charts, <br />business rule definition, etc. <br />In determining the maturity level, we look at :<br />Definition: the extent and formality to which these techniques are defined within the organization<br />Support: management support<br />Performance: in terms of consistency, efficiency and effectiveness of the techniques used<br />
  38. 38. The Capability Areas<br />Practices<br />Requirements Practices & Techniques<br />
  39. 39. The Capability Areas<br />Technology<br />Requirements Authoring and Management Tools<br />The level of:<br /><ul><li>Availability,
  40. 40. Implementation,
  41. 41. Support,
  42. 42. Standardization,
  43. 43. Integration,
  44. 44. Usage, and
  45. 45. Management </li></ul>of software tools in support of requirements authoring, modeling, definition and management.<br />
  46. 46. The Capability Areas<br />Technology<br />Requirements Authoring and Management Tools<br />
  47. 47. The Capability Areas<br />Staff Competency<br />Developing Knowledge, Skill and Ability <br />The level of competency in the knowledge, skills, and ability of the practitioners involved in business analysis, requirements definition and management activities.<br />BA Competency Model<br /><ul><li>Analytical and Systems Thinking
  48. 48. Change Leadership
  49. 49. Client Relationship Management
  50. 50. Consensus and Agreement Building
  51. 51. Requirements Planning
  52. 52. Requirements Elicitation & Analysis
  53. 53. Requirements Management
  54. 54. Domain Knowledge</li></li></ul><li>The Capability Areas<br />Staff Competency<br />Developing Knowledge, Skill and Ability <br />
  55. 55. The Capability Areas<br />Organization<br />Infrastructure, Governance, Management and Support <br />Organizational infrastructure supporting requirements definition and management. e.g., <br />Business Analysis Team<br />Requirements CoE<br />BA Competency Center<br />Requirements Management Office<br />
  56. 56. The Capability Areas<br />Organization<br />Infrastructure, Governance, Management and Support <br />
  57. 57. The Capability Areas<br />Deliverables<br />Work Products and Results<br />The work products and deliverables of the requirements process. e.g., <br />Document or Report Templates<br />objects in a repository or requirements software tool<br />The standardization and management of the outputs or results<br />
  58. 58. The Capability Areas<br />Deliverables<br />Work Products and Results<br />
  59. 59. Requirements Maturity<br />Where are you? …and… Where should/could you be? <br />

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