AIDS Regional

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  • This map displays the number of estimated AIDS cases and rates among adults and adolescents (age 13 years and older) by region of the United States and the District of Columbia for 2006. For 2006, the estimated rate of AIDS among adults and adolescents in the 50 states including the District of Columbia was 14.9 per 100,000 population. The Northeast had the highest AIDS rate, followed by the South, the West and finally the Midwest. The highest estimated number of AIDS cases was in the South, followed by the Northeast, West, and Midwest. In order to include all states in the analysis by region, the analysis was limited to AIDS data because not all states had name-based HIV infection reporting in 2006. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The Census Bureau divides the United States into four regions: Northeast: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont South: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia Midwest: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin West: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming
  • The South had the highest percentage of estimated AIDS cases diagnosed in 2006, followed by the Northeast, West, and Midwest. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The Census Bureau divides the United States into four regions: Northeast: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont South: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia Midwest: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin West: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming
  • The estimated numbers of adults and adolescents given a diagnosis of AIDS from 1996 through 2006 is displayed by region. Beginning with 1996, the highest estimated number of persons with a diagnosis of AIDS was in the South, followed by the Northeast, West, and Midwest. After a period of decline from 1996 through 2000, the estimated number of persons with a diagnosis of AIDS stabilized in all regions through 2006. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The Census Bureau divides the United States into four regions: Northeast: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont South: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia Midwest: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin West: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming
  • The estimated numbers of adults and adolescents living with AIDS increased steadily in each region of the United States from 1996 through 2006. Each year the highest estimated number of persons living with AIDS was in the South, followed by the Northeast, the West, and the Midwest. The South also had the highest increase in the estimated number of persons living with AIDS, from 79,688 in 1996 to 177,591 in 2006. Much of this increase is due to a reduction in the number of deaths attributed to AIDS, which, in turn, is a result of the success of HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy), which became widely available during the mid-1990s. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The Census Bureau divides the United States into four regions: Northeast: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont South: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia Midwest: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin West: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming
  • This table displays the estimated AIDS rates in 2006 among adults and adolescents, by region of the United States, including DC, and the population of the area where persons resided at the time of their AIDS diagnosis. In each region, the highest estimated rates were in the large metropolitan areas (populations of 500,000 or more). The highest estimated AIDS rate was in the Northeast, followed closely by the South. However, in large metropolitan areas (populations of 500,000 or more) and nonmetropolitan areas (populations of fewer than 50,000), the highest estimated rates were in the South. The estimated AIDS rate among adults and adolescents in the Northeast was almost twice the estimated rate in the West, and the estimated rate in the South was more than twice the estimated rate in the Midwest. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The Census Bureau divides the United States into four regions: Northeast: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont South: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia Midwest: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin West: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming
  • In the Northeast the number of adults and adolescents given a diagnosis of AIDS in 2006 was estimated at 9,483. Most (54%) of the persons given a diagnosis resided in New York State, where the rate of AIDS diagnoses was highest. Estimated AIDS rates in New York and Pennsylvania were higher than the national rate. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays.
  • In the Northeast more males than females were given a diagnosis of AIDS in 2006: 2.2 males for every female. Of males in this region who were given a diagnosis of AIDS during 2006, most were blacks, followed by whites, Hispanics, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. Of females in this region who were given a diagnosis of AIDS during 2006, most were blacks, followed by Hispanics, whites, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The states in the Northeast are Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont.
  • In 2006, almost half (49%) of the estimated AIDS cases diagnosed among males in the Northeast were attributed to male-to-male sexual contact. Approximately two-thirds (66%) of the estimated AIDS cases diagnosed among females were attributed to high-risk heterosexual contact. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays and missing risk-factor information. The states in the Northeast are Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont.
  • In the Northeast in 2006, the large metropolitan areas (populations of 500,000 or more) had the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases in males and in females. Among males, the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were diagnosed for blacks, followed by whites and then by Hispanics. Among females, the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were diagnosed for blacks, followed by Hispanics and then by whites. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The states in the Northeast are Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont.
  • In the Midwest, AIDS was diagnosed for an estimated 4,160 persons in 2006. Nearly a third of those cases were diagnosed in Illinois, which also had the highest estimated rate of AIDS diagnoses in the region. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The states in the Midwest are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.
  • In the Midwest more males than females were given a diagnosis of AIDS in 2006: 3.4 males for every female. Of males and females in this region who were given a diagnosis of AIDS during 2006, most were blacks, followed by whites, Hispanics, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The states in the Midwest are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.
  • In 2006, more than two-thirds (68%) of the estimated AIDS cases diagnosed among males in the Midwest were attributed to male-to-male sexual contact. Three-fourths (75%) of the estimated AIDS cases diagnosed among females were attributed to high-risk heterosexual contact. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays and missing risk-factor information. The states in the Midwest are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.
  • In the Midwest in 2006, the large metropolitan areas (populations of 500,000 or more) had the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases in males and in females. Among males, the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were diagnosed for blacks, followed by whites, Hispanics, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. The same pattern was seen among females. In non-metropolitan areas (populations of fewer than 50,000) and medium-sized metropolitan areas (populations of 50,000 to 499,999), the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases diagnosed in males were among whites, followed by blacks, Hispanics, American Indians/Alaska Natives, and Asians/Pacific Islanders. In nonmetropolitan areas (populations of fewer than 50,000), the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases diagnosed in females were among whites, followed by blacks, Hispanics, American Indians/Alaska Natives, and Asians/Pacific Islanders. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The states in the Midwest are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.
  • In the South, AIDS was diagnosed for an estimated 17,083 persons in 2006. The numbers of diagnoses in Florida and Texas were higher than in the other states in the South. More than one-quarter (27%) of the estimated AIDS cases in the region were diagnosed in Florida and 19% were diagnosed in Texas. In the South, the AIDS rates in 9 of the 17 areas exceeded the national rate: District of Columbia, Florida, Maryland, Louisiana, Delaware, South Carolina, Georgia, Texas, and North Carolina. The District of Columbia is a metropolitan area. Use caution when comparing the AIDS rate for the District of Columbia and the AIDS rates for states. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The states in the South are Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.
  • In the South, more males than females were given a diagnosis of AIDS in 2006: 2.4 males for every female. Of males and females in this region who were given a diagnosis of AIDS during 2006, most were blacks, followed by whites, Hispanics, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The states in the South are Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.
  • In 2006, more than half (57%) of the estimated AIDS cases diagnosed among males in the South were attributed to male-to-male sexual contact. More than three-fourths (78%) of the estimated AIDS cases diagnosed among females were attributed to high-risk heterosexual contact. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays and missing risk-factor information. The states in the South are Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.
  • In the South, in 2006, the large metropolitan areas (populations of 500,000 or more) had the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases in males and in females. Among males, the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were diagnosed for blacks, followed by whites, Hispanics, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. The same pattern was seen among females. In medium-sized metropolitan areas (populations of 50,000 to 499,999), the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases in males and in females were diagnosed among blacks, followed by whites, Hispanics, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. In nonmetropolitan areas (populations of fewer than 50,000) the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases diagnosed in males and in females were among blacks, followed by whites, Hispanics, American Indians/Alaska Natives, and Asians/Pacific Islanders. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The states in the South are Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.
  • In the West, AIDS was diagnosed for more males than females: 6.0 males for every female. Of males in this region who were given a diagnosis of AIDS during 2006, most were whites, followed by Hispanics, blacks, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. Of females in this region who were given a diagnosis of AIDS during 2006, most were blacks, followed by Hispanics, whites, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The states in the West are Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.
  • In the West, AIDS was diagnosed for an estimated 6,064 persons in 2006. The numbers of diagnoses in California were higher than in other states in the West. Almost two-thirds (64%) of the estimated AIDS cases in the region were in California. In the West, all state rates were lower than the national rate. The states in the region with the highest rates include: Nevada, California, and Arizona. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The states in the West are Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.
  • In 2006, almost three-fourths (72%) of the estimated AIDS cases diagnosed among males in the West were attributed to male-to-male sexual contact. More than two-thirds (69%) of the estimated AIDS cases diagnosed among females were attributed to high-risk heterosexual contact. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays and missing risk-factor information. The states in the West are Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.
  • In the West, in 2006 the large metropolitan areas (populations of 500,000 or more) had the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases diagnosed in males and in females. Among males, the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were diagnosed for whites, followed by Hispanics blacks, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. Among females, the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were diagnosed among blacks, followed by Hispanics, whites, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. In medium-sized metropolitan areas (populations of 50,000 to 499,999) the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases for men were diagnosed among whites, followed by Hispanics, blacks, American Indians/Alaska Natives, and Asians/Pacific Islanders. Among women, the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were diagnosed among whites, followed by Hispanics, blacks, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. In non-metropolitan areas (populations of fewer than 50,000) the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases diagnosed in males were among whites, Hispanics, blacks, American Indians/Alaska Natives, and Asians/Pacific Islanders. Among females, the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were diagnosed among whites, Hispanics, American Indians/Alaska Natives, and blacks. There were no cases diagnosed among Asians/Pacific Islanders. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The states in the West are Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.
  • In 2006, more estimated cases of AIDS were diagnosed in the South than in any other region in the United States. In each region, more of the diagnoses were for males than for females. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The Census Bureau divides the United States into four regions: Northeast: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont South: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia Midwest: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin West: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming
  • In each region, the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were among persons aged 35 to 44 years, followed by 45 to 54 years. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The Census Bureau divides the United States into four regions: Northeast: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont South: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia Midwest: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin West: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming.
  • In 2006, among males in the Northeast, the Midwest, and the South, more estimated cases of AIDS were diagnosed among blacks, followed by whites, Hispanics, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. In the West more estimated cases of AIDS were diagnosed among whites, followed by Hispanics, blacks, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The Census Bureau divides the United States into four regions: Northeast: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont South Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia Midwest: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin West: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming.
  • In 2006, among females in the Northeast and the West, more estimated cases of AIDS were diagnosed among blacks, followed by Hispanics, whites, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. In the Midwest and the South, more estimated cases of AIDS were diagnosed among blacks, followed by whites, Hispanics, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The Census Bureau divides the United States into four regions: Northeast: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont South: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia Midwest: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin West: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming.
  • Among males given a diagnosis of AIDS in 2006 in all regions, more cases were attributed to male-to-male sexual contact. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays and missing risk-factor information. The Census Bureau divides the United States into four regions: Northeast: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont South: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia Midwest: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin West: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming.
  • Among females given a diagnosis of AIDS in 2006 in all regions, more cases were attributed to high-risk heterosexual contact. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays and missing risk-factor information The Census Bureau divides the United States into four regions: Northeast: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont South: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia Midwest: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin West: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming.
  • In the Northeast, large metropolitan areas (populations of 500,000 or more) had the highest estimated number of AIDS cases diagnosed in males in 2006. The highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were diagnosed among blacks, followed by whites, Hispanics, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. In nonmetropolitan areas (populations of fewer than 50,000) and medium-sized metropolitan areas (populations of 50,000 to 499,000) the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were diagnosed among whites, followed by blacks, Hispanics, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The states in the Northeast are Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont.
  • In the Northeast, large metropolitan areas (populations of 500,000 or more) had the highest estimated number of AIDS cases diagnosed in females in 2006. The highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were diagnosed among blacks, followed by Hispanics, whites, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. In medium-sized metropolitan areas (populations of 50,000 to 499,000) the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were diagnosed among blacks, followed by whites, Hispanics, and Asians/Pacific Islanders. There were no AIDS cases diagnosed among American Indians/Alaska Natives. In nonmetropolitan areas (populations of fewer than 50,000) the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were diagnosed among whites, followed by blacks, and Hispanics. There were no AIDS cases diagnosed among Asians/Pacific Islanders and American Indians/Alaska Natives. The data have been adjusted for reporting. The states in the Northeast are Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont.
  • In the Midwest, large metropolitan areas (populations of 500,000 or more) had the highest estimated number of AIDS cases diagnosed in males in 2006. The highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were diagnosed among blacks, followed by whites, Hispanics, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. In nonmetropolitan areas (populations of fewer than 50,000) and medium-sized metropolitan areas (populations of 50,000 to 499,000) the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were diagnosed among whites, followed by blacks, Hispanics, American Indians/Alaska Natives, and Asians/Pacific Islanders. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The states in the Midwest are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.
  • In the Midwest, large metropolitan areas (populations of 500,000 or more) had the highest estimated number of AIDS cases diagnosed in females in 2006. The highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were diagnosed among blacks, followed by whites, Hispanics, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. In medium-sized metropolitan areas (populations of 50,000 to 499,000) the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were diagnosed among blacks, followed by whites, Hispanics, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. In nonmetropolitan areas (populations of fewer than 50,000) the highest estimated numbers of cases were diagnosed among whites, followed by blacks, Hispanics, and Asians/Pacific Islanders and American Indians/Alaska Natives. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The states in the Midwest are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.
  • In the South, large metropolitan areas (populations of 500,000 or more) had the highest estimated number of AIDS cases diagnosed in males in 2006. The highest estimated numbers of cases were diagnosed among blacks, followed by whites, Hispanics, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. This trend also applies in medium-sized metropolitan areas (populations of 50,000 to 499,000. In nonmetropolitan areas (populations of fewer than 50,000) the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were diagnosed among blacks, followed by whites, Hispanics, American Indians/Alaska Natives, and Asians/Pacific Islanders. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The states in the South rare Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.
  • In the South, large metropolitan areas (populations of 500,000 or more) had the highest estimated number of AIDS cases diagnosed in females in 2006. The highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were diagnosed among blacks, followed by whites, Hispanics, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. This trend also applies in medium-sized metropolitan areas (populations of 50,000 to 499,000). In nonmetropolitan areas (populations of fewer than 50,000) the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were diagnosed among blacks, followed by whites, Hispanics, American Indians/Alaska Natives, and Asians/Pacific Islanders. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The states in the South are Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.
  • In the West, large metropolitan areas (populations of 500,000 or more) had the highest estimated number of AIDS cases diagnosed in males in 2006. The highest estimated numbers of cases were diagnosed among whites, followed by Hispanics, blacks, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. In nonmetropolitan areas (populations of fewer than 50,000) and medium-sized metropolitan areas (populations of 50,000 to 499,000) the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were diagnosed among whites, followed by Hispanics, blacks, American Indians/Alaska Natives and Asians/Pacific Islanders. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The states in the West are Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.
  • In the West, large metropolitan areas (populations of 500,000 or more) had the highest estimated number of AIDS cases diagnosed in females in 2006. The highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were diagnosed among blacks, followed by Hispanics, whites, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. In medium-sized metropolitan areas (populations of 50,000 to 499,000) the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were diagnosed among whites, followed Hispanics, blacks, and Asians/Pacific Islanders and American Indians/Alaska Natives. In nonmetropolitan areas (populations of fewer than 50,000) the highest estimated numbers of AIDS cases were diagnosed among whites, followed by Hispanics, American Indians/Alaska Natives, and blacks. There were no cases diagnosed among Asians/Pacific Islanders. The data have been adjusted for reporting delays. The states in the West are Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.
  • AIDS Regional

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