Adolescents

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  • HIV Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults For all slides in this series, the following notes apply: Estimated numbers and rates of diagnoses of HIV infection are based on data from 46 states and 5 U.S. dependent areas that have had confidential name-based HIV infection reporting for a sufficient length of time (i.e., implemented in area since at least January 2007 and reported to CDC since at least June 2007) to allow for stabilization of data collection and for adjustment of the data in order to monitor trends. Estimated numbers and rates of AIDS diagnoses are based on data from the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and 6 U.S. dependent areas. For the first time, the Republic of Palau has been included in numbers and rates of AIDS diagnoses, deaths, and persons living with AIDS. Rates are not calculated by race/ethnicity for the 6 U.S. dependent areas because the U.S. Census Bureau does not collect information from all U.S. dependent areas. At the time of development of this slide series, complete 2010 census data were not available from the U.S. Census Bureau. Therefore, all U.S. population estimates and denominators used to calculate rates were based on the official postcensus estimates for 2009.
  • During 2007 through 2010, blacks/African Americans constituted more than 55% of diagnoses of HIV infection each year among adolescents and young adults aged 13 to 24 years in the 46 states and 5 U.S. dependent areas with confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007). In 2010, of persons aged 13 to 24 years diagnosed with HIV infection, 59% were black/African American, 19% were white, 19% were Hispanic/Latino, 1% each were Asian and persons reporting multiple races, and less than 1% were American Indian/Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander.   The racial/ethnic distribution of diagnoses of HIV infection in persons aged 13 to 24 years differs substantially from the distribution of diagnoses among all adults and adolescents (aged 13 and over) in 2010. Among all adults and adolescents diagnosed with HIV infection in 2009, 45% were black/African American, 29% were white, 22% were Hispanic/Latino, 2% were Asian, 1% were of multiple races, and less than 1% each were American Indian/Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander.   The following 46 states have had laws or regulations requiring confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007): Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. The 5 U.S. dependent areas include American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.   Data include persons with a diagnosis of HIV infection regardless of stage of disease at diagnosis. All displayed data are estimates. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays, but not for incomplete reporting.   Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.  
  • This slide presents the distribution of diagnoses of HIV infection by transmission category for adolescents and young adults 13 to 24 years of age diagnosed from 2007 through 2010 in the 46 states and 5 U.S. dependent areas with confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007).   Among adolescents and young adults, the estimated percentage of diagnosed HIV infections attributed to male-to-male sexual contact increased from 67% in 2007 to 76% in 2010. The percentage of diagnosed HIV infections attributed to heterosexual contact decreased from 25% to 18% during this time. The percentage of diagnosed HIV infections attributed to injection drug use also decreased slightly, from 5% to 3%. The percentage of diagnosed HIV infections attributed to male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use remained relatively stable from 2007 through 2010.   The remaining diagnoses of HIV infection were those attributed to hemophilia or the receipt of blood or blood products, and those in persons without an identified risk factor.   The following 46 states have had laws or regulations requiring confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007): Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. The 5 U.S. dependent areas include American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.   Data include persons with a diagnosis of HIV infection regardless of stage of disease at diagnosis. All displayed data are estimates. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays and missing risk-factor information, but not for incomplete reporting.   Heterosexual contact is with a person known to have, or to be at high risk for, HIV infection.
  • Black/African American adolescents aged 13 to 19 years have been disproportionately affected by HIV. In 2010, in the 46 states with confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007), 15% of adolescents were black/African American, yet an estimated 69% of diagnoses of HIV infection in 13 to 19 year olds were in black/African American adolescents.   The following 46 states have had laws or regulations requiring confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007): Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.   Data include persons with a diagnosis of HIV infection regardless of stage of disease at diagnosis. All displayed data are estimates. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays, but not for incomplete reporting.   Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.
  • Black/African American young adults aged 20 to 24 years have been disproportionately affected by HIV. In 2010, in the 46 states with confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007), 14% of young adults were black/African American, yet an estimated 57% of diagnoses of HIV infection in 20 to 24 year olds were in blacks/African Americans.   The following 46 states have had laws or regulations requiring confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007): Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.   Data include persons with a diagnosis of HIV infection regardless of stage of disease at diagnosis. All displayed data are estimates. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays, but not for incomplete reporting.   Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.  
  • In 2010, the distribution of diagnoses of HIV infection by sex varied with age group at diagnosis in the 46 states and 5 U.S. dependent areas with confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007). In 2010, females accounted for an estimated 21% of adolescents aged 13 to 19 years diagnosed with HIV infection, compared with 15% of young adults aged 20 to 24 years and 23% of adults aged 25 years and older.   The following 46 states have had laws or regulations requiring confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007): Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. The 5 U.S. dependent areas include American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.   Data include persons with a diagnosis of HIV infection regardless of stage of disease at diagnosis. All displayed data are estimates. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays, but not for incomplete reporting. Age group assigned based on age at diagnosis.  
  • This slide shows the estimated numbers and percentages of diagnoses of HIV infection among adolescent males aged 13 to 19 years and young adult males aged 20 to 24 years in 2010 in the 46 states and 5 U.S. dependent areas with confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007). In 2010, in both age groups, the majority of diagnosed HIV infections among adolescent and young adult males were attributed to male-to-male sexual contact: 91% of diagnoses in males aged 13 to 19 years, and 90% of diagnoses in males aged 20 to 24 years.   The following 46 states have had laws or regulations requiring confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007): Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. The 5 U.S. dependent areas include American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.   Data include persons with a diagnosis of HIV infection regardless of stage of disease at diagnosis. All displayed data are estimates. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays and missing risk-factor information, but not for incomplete reporting.   Heterosexual contact is with a person known to have, or to be at high risk for, HIV infection.
  • This slide shows the estimated numbers and percentages of diagnoses of HIV infection among adolescent females aged 13 to 19 years and young adult females aged 20 to 24 years in 2010 in the 46 states and 5 U.S. dependent areas with confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007). In 2010, in both age groups, the majority of diagnosed HIV infections among adolescent and young adult females were attributed to heterosexual contact: 92% in females aged 13 to 19 years, and 90% in females aged 20 to 24 years.   The following 46 states have had laws or regulations requiring confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007): Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. The 5 U.S. dependent areas include American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.   Data include persons with a diagnosis of HIV infection regardless of stage of disease at diagnosis. All displayed data are estimates. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays and missing risk-factor information, but not for incomplete reporting.   Heterosexual contact is with a person known to have, or to be at high risk for, HIV infection.
  • In 2010, there were an estimated 2,266 adolescents aged 13 to 19 years diagnosed with HIV infection in the 46 states and 5 U.S. dependent areas with confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007). The estimated rate of diagnoses of HIV infection in adolescents was 7.9 per 100,000 population. The rates of diagnoses of HIV infection among adolescents aged 13 to 19 years in 2010 were highest in Louisiana (21.1 per 100,000), South Carolina (16.4 per 100,000) Florida (15.9 per 100,000), and the U.S. Virgin Islands (15.8 per 100,000).   The following 46 states have had laws or regulations requiring confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007): Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. The 5 U.S. dependent areas include American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Data include persons with a diagnosis of HIV infection regardless of stage of disease at diagnosis. All displayed data are estimates. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays, but not for incomplete reporting.
  • In 2010, there were an estimated 7,675 young adults aged 20 to 24 years diagnosed with HIV infection in the 46 states and 5 U.S. dependent areas with confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007). The estimated rate of diagnoses of HIV infection in young adults was 36.9 per 100,000 population. With the exception of New York (58.3 per 100,000), New Jersey (52.5 per 100,000), Nevada (46.0 per 100,000), and the U.S Virgin Islands (44.3 per 100,000), the rates of diagnoses of HIV infection among young adults 20 to 24 years of age in 2010 were highest in the South; specifically, Florida (68.1 per 100,000), Georgia (67.7 per 100,000), Louisiana (67.3 per 100,000), South Carolina (62.6 per 100,000), Mississippi (48.2 per 100,000), Alabama (47.3 per 100,000), North Carolina (44.1 per 100,000), Texas (43.7 per 100,000), Tennessee (42.9 per 100,000), and Virginia (41.2 per 100,000).   The following 46 states have had laws or regulations requiring confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007): Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. The 5 U.S. dependent areas include American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Data include persons with a diagnosis of HIV infection regardless of stage of disease at diagnosis. All displayed data are estimates. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays, but not for incomplete reporting.
  • At the end of 2009, an estimated 34,733 adolescents and young adults 13 to 24 years of age were living with a diagnosis of HIV infection in the 46 states and 5 U.S. dependent areas with confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007).   Of the 23,984 adolescent and young adult males living with a diagnosis of HIV infection, 60% were black/African American, 20% were Hispanic/Latino, and 16% were white. Two percent were males of multiple races. Less than 1% each was Asian, American Indian/Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander.   Among adolescent and young adult females living with a diagnosis of HIV infection, 63% were black/African American, 19% were Hispanic/Latino, and 15% were white. Two percent of females living with a diagnosis of HIV infection were females of multiple races. Less than 1% each was Asian, American Indian/Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander.   The following 46 states have had laws or regulations requiring confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007): Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. The 5 U.S. dependent areas include American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Data include persons with a diagnosis of HIV infection regardless of stage of disease at diagnosis. All displayed data are estimates. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays, but not for incomplete reporting.   The Asian category includes Asian/Pacific Islander legacy cases (cases that were diagnosed and reported under the old Office of Management and Budget race/ethnicity classification system).   Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.   Persons living with a diagnosis of HIV infection are classified as adolescent and young adult based on age at end of 2009.
  • This slide presents the distribution of adolescents and young adults aged 13 to 24 years living with a diagnosis of HIV infection at the end of 2009 by sex and transmission category, in the 46 states and 5 U.S dependent areas with confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007).   Among adolescent and young adult males living with a diagnosis of HIV infection, 76% of infections were attributed to male-to-male sexual contact. An estimated 4% were attributed to heterosexual contact, 3% attributed to male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use, and 2% to injection drug use. Approximately 15% of males aged 13 to 24 were living with diagnosed HIV infection attributed to other modes of transmission, the majority of which was perinatal exposure.   Among adolescent and young adult females living with a diagnosis of HIV infection at the end of 2009, 58% of infections were attributed to heterosexual contact and 7% to injection drug use. An estimated 35% of females aged 13-24 were living with diagnosed HIV infection attributed to other modes of transmission, the majority of which was perinatal exposure.   The following 46 states have had laws or regulations requiring confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007): Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. The 5 U.S. dependent areas include American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Data include persons with a diagnosis of HIV infection regardless of stage of disease at diagnosis. All displayed data are estimates. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays and missing risk-factor information, but not for incomplete reporting.   Heterosexual contact is with a person known to have, or to be at high risk for, HIV infection.   Persons living with a diagnosis of HIV infection are classified as adolescent and young adult based on age at end of 2009.
  • At the end of 2009, there were an estimated 8,404 adolescents aged 13 to 19 years living with a diagnosis of HIV infection in the 46 states and 5 U.S. dependent areas with confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007). The estimated rate of adolescents living with a diagnosis of HIV infection was 29.2 per 100,000 population. The rates of adolescents living with a diagnosis of HIV infection at the end of 2009 were highest in New York (99.9 per 100,000), Florida (69.7 per 100,000), and New Jersey (58.9 per 100,000) The following 46 states have had laws or regulations requiring confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007): Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. The 5 U.S. dependent areas include American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Data include persons with a diagnosis of HIV infection regardless of stage of disease at diagnosis. All displayed data are estimates. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays, but not for incomplete reporting.   Persons living with a diagnosis of HIV infection are classified as adolescent based on age at end of 2009.
  • At the end of 2009, there were an estimated 26,329 young adults aged 20 to 24 years living with a diagnosis of HIV infection in the 46 states and 5 U.S. dependent areas with confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007). The estimated rate of young adults living with a diagnosis of HIV infection was 126.5 per 100,000 population. The rates of young adults living with a diagnosis of HIV infection at the end of 2009 were highest in New York (278.1 per 100,000), Florida (239.3 per 100,000), and Louisiana (227.7 per 100,000); the majority of states with rates of young adults living with a diagnosis of HIV infection over 100.0 per 100,000 population were in the South.   The following 46 states have had laws or regulations requiring confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2007 (and reporting to CDC since at least June 2007): Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. The 5 U.S. dependent areas include American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Data include persons with a diagnosis of HIV infection regardless of stage of disease at diagnosis. All displayed data are estimates. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays, but not for incomplete reporting.   Persons living with a diagnosis of HIV infection are classified as young adult based on age at end of 2009.
  • From 1985 through 2010, 9,276 adolescents aged 13 to 19 years were diagnosed with AIDS in the United States and 6 U.S. dependent areas. In earlier years, most AIDS diagnoses among adolescents were in males; over time, the male-to-female ratio has decreased. In 2010, 582 adolescents were diagnosed with AIDS; of these, 404 (69%) were male and 178 (31%) were female.   All displayed data are estimates. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays, but not for incomplete reporting.
  • From 1985 through 2010, a total of 45,621 young adults aged 20 to 24 years were diagnosed with AIDS in the United States and 6 U.S dependent areas. In 1985, 88% of AIDS diagnoses in young adults 20 to 24 years of age were in males. However, as heterosexual contact has accounted for an increasing percentage of HIV infections, particularly in females, the percentage of AIDS diagnoses in females has increased. The percentage of AIDS diagnoses in females peaked in 1998 at 42% of diagnoses in young adults, and has decreased since that time. In 2010, 18% of the 2,280 AIDS diagnoses in young adults were in females.   All displayed data are estimates. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays, but not for incomplete reporting.
  • This slide compares the racial/ethnic distributions of AIDS diagnoses during 2010 in adolescents 13 to 19 years of age, young adults 20 to 24 years of age, and adults 25 years and over in the United States and 6 U.S. dependent areas. In all three age groups, blacks/African Americans had the largest percentage of AIDS diagnoses, although the percentage decreased as age group increased: 70% in persons aged 13 to 19 years, 60% in persons aged 20 to 24 years, and 47% in persons aged 25 years and over. While Hispanics/Latinos accounted for relatively similar percentages of AIDS diagnoses in all three age groups, they represented the second largest percentage of persons in adolescents (19%) and young adults (21%) and the third largest percentage of persons in adults over 25 years of age (22%). The percentage of AIDS diagnoses among whites in 2010 increased as age group increased: 9% in persons aged 13 to 19 years, 15% in persons aged 20 to 24 years, and 28% in persons aged 25 years and over. All displayed data are estimates. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays, but not for incomplete reporting. Age group assigned based on age at AIDS diagnosis. The Asian category includes Asian/Pacific Islander legacy cases (cases that were diagnosed and reported under the old Office of Management and Budget race/ethnicity classification system). Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.
  • In 2010, there were an estimated 582 AIDS diagnoses in adolescents aged 13 to 19 years in the United States and 6 U.S. dependent areas. The overall rate was 1.9 per 100,000 population. The highest rates of AIDS diagnoses in adolescents were in the District of Columbia (19.1 per 100,000 population), South Carolina (5.7 per 100,000 population), New York (5.1 per 100,000 population), Louisiana (4.4 per 100,000 population), and New Jersey (4.4 per 100,000 population). The District of Columbia is a metropolitan area; use caution when comparing the AIDS diagnosis rate in D.C. to state AIDS diagnosis rates.   All displayed data are estimates. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays, but not for incomplete reporting.
  • In 2010, there were an estimated 2,280 AIDS diagnoses in young adults 20 to 24 years of age in the United States and 6 U.S. dependent areas. The overall rate was 10.4 per 100,000 population. The highest rates of AIDS diagnoses in young adults were in the District of Columbia (105.4 per 100,000 population), Louisiana (22.3 per 100,000 population), Maryland (20.8 per 100,000 population), South Carolina (19.8 per 100,000 population), New York (19.3 per 100,000 population), Mississippi (17.8 per 100,000 population), and Florida (16.3 per 100,000 population). The District of Columbia is a metropolitan area; use caution when comparing the AIDS diagnosis rate in D.C. to state AIDS diagnosis rates.   All displayed data are estimates. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays, but not for incomplete reporting.
  • At the end of 2009, an estimated 3,282 adolescents aged 13 to 19 years were living with an AIDS diagnosis in the United States and 6 U.S. dependent areas. The overall rate of adolescents living with an AIDS diagnosis was 10.9 per 100,000 population. The highest rates in adolescents were in the District of Columbia (120.0 per 100,000 population), New York (40.4 per 100,000 population), and Florida (32.3 per 100,000 population). The District of Columbia is a metropolitan area; use caution when comparing the rates of persons living with an AIDS diagnosis in D.C. to state AIDS rates of persons living with an AIDS diagnosis .   All displayed data are estimates. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays, but not for incomplete reporting.
  • At the end of 2009, an estimated 7,258 young adults aged 20 to 24 years were living with an AIDS diagnosis in the United States and 6 U.S. dependent areas. The overall rate of young adults living with an AIDS diagnosis was 33.2 per 100,000 population. The highest rates in young adults were in the District of Columbia (277.7 per 100,000 population), New York (93.4 per 100,000 population), Maryland (72.9 per 100,000 population), Florida (66.3 per 100,000 population), Puerto Rico (57.9 per 100,000 population), Louisiana (55.5 per 100,000 population), South Carolina (52.0 per 100,000 population), and Delaware (45.9 per 100,000 population). The District of Columbia is a metropolitan area; use caution when comparing the rates of persons living with an AIDS diagnosis in D.C. to state AIDS rates of persons living with an AIDS diagnosis.   All displayed data are estimates. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays, but not for incomplete reporting.  
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