Energy 101 ener noc and demand response

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  • Script:“Because there is no storage of electricity, we build power plants and transmission lines to meet the peak demand. However, the grid peaks rarely so we only use 90% or greater of system capacity 1% of the entire year --- 80 hours or less. That’s incredibly expensive. Furthermore, the system is complicated and prices fluctuate significantly. End users can help to meet these challenges by participating in demand response programs.”
  • Script: “There are many benefits to demand response participation:Payments: EnerNOC has paid out over $200M of demand response payments to customers. Customers earn anywhere from a few thousand to over a million dollars per year depending on the amount of demand they can reduce.”Protect Your Community: Blackouts are extremely expensive for the local community and its economy. By doing your part, you keep the lights on for everyone.Preserve the Environment: During times of peak demand, the oldest and dirtiest power plants are activated; demand response makes that less likely. Also, blackouts cause disruptions that are often environmentally damaging, such as overflows from waster water treatment plants.”Protect Your Operation: Prior to a blackout, voltage on the grid is often reduced. This can damage sensitive and expensive motors. Also, the sudden interruption of a blackout can disrupt the flow of work and equipment. It’s all about getting the heads-up so you can be prepared and making it less likely that the blackout will actually occur.”
  • Energy 101 ener noc and demand response

    1. 1. Demand Response 101 Johnson Energy Club January 23, 2013© EnerNOC Inc.
    2. 2. Agenda • Demand Response Overview • How it works • Three perspectives • Quick Case Study • Discussion / Next Steps for MBAs 2
    3. 3. How Demand Response Works Utility Anticipates Supply Shortfall Utility Notifies EnerNOC of pending Typical Demand Response Event grid emergency EnerNOC dispatches its portfolio of customers to curtail energy usage Customers initiate curtailment plan EnerNOC network operation center coaches underperformers Notify Respond Restore Load reduction is delivered to the grid at precisely the time it is needed Customers receive payment for verifiable load delivery 3
    4. 4. C&I Customers of all types 4 4
    5. 5. Balancing supply/demand is difficult and expensiveEnd users of electricity that provide a balancing resource can be compensated Annual Electricity Demand As a Percent of Available Capacity 100% 90% 75% 50% 25% Winter Spring Summer Fall 5
    6. 6. Strong value proposition to end-users Earn Payments Protect Your Protect Your Preserve the Operation Community Environment 6
    7. 7. EnerNOC’s Mission: Unlock The ValueComprehensive application suite for every energy management need MetersBMS/BAS/EMS Bills/Rates External(e.g. weather, prices) 7
    8. 8. Quick Case Study: California industrial end userMulti-tenant industrial park in PGEservice territory• Converted building with inconsistentmetering• One of the large tenants has a corporatesustainability effort and works with anenergy consultant• Most tenants are smaller, privately heldentities• Decision-makers include a part-timeproperty manager, PG&E accountrepresentative and the individual businessmanagers 8
    9. 9. Clear opportunity for EnerNOC-created value EnerNOC provides: Commercial 1. Customized energy reduction plans 2. Simple, no-cost implementation 3. Maximum event preparedness and Local Utility performance Institutional 4. Maximized payments and revenue assurance Industrial 9
    10. 10. Focus: End User’s Perspective• Other priorities• Current energy management landscape (rates, operational considerations, decision-making, etc.)• CostWhat are the levers?- Utility perspective- End user perspective- EnerNOC perspective 10
    11. 11. Discussion / Next Steps for MBAs 11
    12. 12. Brian AlwardAccount Manager 12

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