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2010 Spring Google Wave Presentation

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2010 Spring Google Wave Presentation

  1. 1. A Preview for Using<br />Google Wave<br />in the<br />Language Classroom<br />
  2. 2. What is Wave?<br />
  3. 3. Wave is…<br />Wikipedia: “a web-based service, computing platform, and communications protocol designed to merge e-mail, instant messaging, wikis, and social networking. It has a strong collaborative and real-time focus supported by extensions…”<br /> (source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Wave)<br />Google: “a personal communication and collaboration tool that makes real-time interactions more seamless…”<br /> (source: http://www.google.com/support/wave/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=162898)<br />Gina Trapani (wrote a book about Wave): “multimedia wikichat”<br /> (source: interview, http://smarterware.org/4475/frequently-asked-questions-about-google-wave)<br />
  4. 4. Wave is…<br /><ul><li>At the center: “waves”
  5. 5. What’s a wave? (Not Wave, but wave)
  6. 6. Server-hosted xml document
  7. 7. Synchronous and asynchronous capabilities
  8. 8. Merges text, audio/video media, attachments, gadgets, & more
  9. 9. Still to come: spreadsheets, presentations, other “office” docs
  10. 10. Will take many different shapes: image, video, audio files, etc.
  11. 11. Waves are, in turn, embeddable (e.g., blogs)</li></li></ul><li>Let’s take a look.<br />
  12. 12. Overview of Layout<br />
  13. 13. Folders Panel<br />
  14. 14. Contacts Panel<br />
  15. 15. Folder Contents Panel<br />
  16. 16. Wave Panel<br />
  17. 17. Why Wave?<br />
  18. 18. Advantages for the L2 classroom<br />Open platform<br /><ul><li>OS independent (Mac/PC)
  19. 19. Many users from any location can collaborate
  20. 20. Think Google Docs</li></ul>Accessibility<br /><ul><li>Many people already have Google accounts
  21. 21. Target language speakers</li></ul>Beyond UIC<br /><ul><li>Waves persist privately or publicly
  22. 22. Truly multilingual
  23. 23. Not just Latin alphabets
  24. 24. Unicode repetoire: L2R, R2L, Syllabaries, Abjads, Abugidas, Logograms
  25. 25. IME-dependent languages
  26. 26. Playback feature
  27. 27. Easily review student contributions
  28. 28. Think accountability</li></li></ul><li>Advantages for the L2 classroom<br />… but more importantly<br />Ease of <br />Collaboration<br />
  29. 29. A couple of issues<br />Technology in infancy<br /><ul><li>Missing some basic, useful features
  30. 30. Some extensions (gadgets & bots) difficult to use
  31. 31. Wave isn’t an established medium like e-mail</li></ul>Privacy à la Google<br /><ul><li>Many folks have legitimate concerns
  32. 32. Work-arounds exist
  33. 33. Truly multilingual
  34. 34. NLP & Translation (more later)
  35. 35. New communication model + expanding versatility = learning curve
  36. 36. UI underrepresents capacity
  37. 37. Waves will be able to become any kind of ‘document’
  38. 38. Potential Messiness
  39. 39. 1 line ÷ 1 blip = bad
  40. 40. More than e-mail or chat</li></li></ul><li>Wave Clutter<br />
  41. 41. Wave HOW & WHEN?<br />
  42. 42. What you’ll need to get started<br />Eventually, Wave account incorporated in Google account, but until then…<br />An invitation<br />Sporty computer<br />Some practice<br />
  43. 43. Projects made easy with Wave<br /><ul><li>Richer wikis
  44. 44. Interactive trip itineraries
  45. 45. Target language multimedia “chats”
  46. 46. Group brainstorming
  47. 47. Hold audio & video conferences
  48. 48. Learner-generated, cumulative note-taking</li></ul>And each project could be reviewed/edited by a native speaker of a target language.<br />
  49. 49. Let’s take a closer look.<br />
  50. 50. Wiki in Wave<br />
  51. 51. Wiki in Wave<br />
  52. 52. Itinerary in Wave<br />
  53. 53. Itinerary in Wave<br />
  54. 54. Student Note-taking in Wave<br />
  55. 55. Student Note-taking in Wave<br />
  56. 56. email-type wave<br />im-type wave<br />playback <br />accountability<br />private replies (show next slide – wave/wavelet/blip diagram)<br />photo attachments (?)<br />drag-n-drop [google gears]; demo with deena<br />copying blips into new wave <br />picture blip, conversation blip; <br />good for wave final drafts to be shared<br />embedding waves on websites (blogs, lclc: “index_wavetest.shtml”)<br />drag-n-drop links to other waves<br />Extensions (?)<br />gadgets – client-side<br />mappy, trippy, google search (link urls, add images w/ image search), video chat, mind map, etc.<br />robots (“bots”) – server-side participants (synchronous)<br />spell check w/ NLP, url detection, translation, youtube link add/embed<br />
  57. 57. Structure<br />
  58. 58. Specific concerns for language instructors<br />Translation bots<br />Participant hierarchy … or lack thereof<br />Again, 1 line ÷ 1 blip = bad<br />
  59. 59. Thank you!<br />For more information, contact:<br />L. D. Nicholas May<br />Lmay4@uic.edu<br />created by L. D. Nicholas May<br />

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