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Basic Patterns

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Basic Patterns

  1. 1. BASIC PATTERNS<br />GRAMMAR + MECHANICS<br />PART 1<br />
  2. 2. THREE BASIC PATTERNS IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE<br />SUBJECT – INTRANSITIVE VERB (S I V)<br />SUBJECT – TRANSITIVE VERB – COMPLEMENT (S T C)<br />SUBJECT – LINKING VERB – SUBJECT COMPLEMENT (S L C)<br />
  3. 3. UNDERSTOOD SUBJECT<br />WHEN THE SENTENCE IS A COMMAND, THE SUBJECT IS UNDERSTOOD.<br />CLEAN YOUR ROOM!<br />THE UNDERSTOOD SUBJECT = “YOU”<br />
  4. 4. VERBS<br />INTRANSITIVE – NO COMPLEMENT<br />TRANSITIVE – HAS A COMPLEMENT<br />LINKING – LINKS SUBJECT WITH A COMPLEMENT<br />
  5. 5. WHAT IS A COMPLEMENT?<br />A complement is a word, phrase or clause which is necessary in a sentence to complete its meaning.<br />
  6. 6. INTRANSITIVE VERBS<br />DOES NOT NEED A COMPLEMENT TO COMPLETE THE MEANING<br />He ran slowly. <br />Ran does not have an object. <br />She walked across the bridge.<br />Walked does not have an object.<br />
  7. 7. TRANSITIVE VERBS<br />DOES NEED A COMPLEMENT TO COMPLETE MEANING <br />He gave her the flowers. <br />Gave what? flowers<br />He mailed the letter.<br />Mailed what? letter<br />
  8. 8. LINKING VERBS<br />Shows a relationship between subject and complement. <br />The words after the verb further describe the subject in some way.<br />Not action verbs.<br />
  9. 9. LINKING VERBS<br />Forms of the verb “to be”<br />Am, Is, Is being, Are, Are being, Was, Was being, Were, Has, Has been, Have been, Will be, Will have been, Had been, Are being, Might have been<br />
  10. 10. LINKING VERBS<br />Forms of the verb “to become”<br />Become, Becomes, Became, Has become, Have become, Had become, Will become, Will have become<br />
  11. 11. LINKING VERBS<br />Forms of the verb “to seem”<br />Seemed, Seeming, Seems, Has seemed, Had seemed, Will seem<br />
  12. 12. LINKING VERBS<br />&quot;I am glad it is Friday.&quot; Here the linking verb &quot;am&quot; connects the subject (I) to the state of being glad.<br />&quot;Laura is excited about her new bike.&quot; Here &quot;is&quot; describes Laura&apos;s emotional state of excitement.<br />&quot;My birds are hungry.&quot; The word &quot;are&quot; identifies that the birds currently exist in a physical state of hunger.<br />
  13. 13. LINKING VERBS<br />Action verbs that can be linking verbs<br />Grow, Look, Prove, Remain, Smell, Sound, Taste, Turn, Stay, Get, Appear, Feel<br />
  14. 14. LINKING VERBS<br />The flowered looked wilted.<br />Looked = linking<br />She looked for flowers.<br />Looked = Action (Transitive)<br />
  15. 15. LINKING VERBS<br /> The sauce tasted delicious. <br />Tasted = linking<br />She tasted the sauce.<br />Tasted = Action (transitive)<br />
  16. 16. COMPOUND SUBJECTS / PREDICATES <br />COMPOUND SUBJECT – WHEN MORE THAN ONE SUBJECT IS COMPLETING THE ACTION<br />COMPOUND PREDICATE – WHEN THE SUBJECT IS DOING MORE THAN ONE THING (TWO VERBS)<br />
  17. 17. PASSIVE / ACTIVE SENTENCES<br />ACTIVE SENTENCE – WHEN THE “DOER” IS IN THE SUBJECT PORTION OF THE SENTENCE.<br />DAVID PLAYED GUITAR <br />PASSIVE SENTENCE – WHEN THE OBJECT RECEIVING THE ACTION IS LOCATED IN THE SUBJECT PORTION OF THE SENTENCE.<br />THE GUITAR WAS PLAYED BY DAVID. <br />

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