Camera-Free Photography

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Camera-Free Photography

  1. 1. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for Photography 1 (8 th and 9 th grade) Designed by Heidi West [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Photo by Matt Callow
  2. 2. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] <ul><ul><li>The role of the artist is to communicate his or her view of the world to others. For years, photographers have been manipulating light and the world around them to emphasize what they find most important, most beautiful, most compelling. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>You have already had some experience as photographers, recording the world around you, but have you ever wondered who got it all started? Have you ever wondered who did the first experiment with light and film? Have you ever wanted to get inside a camera and see how it all works when you press the button? </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] You’ve just been hired in the visual arts department of a company that specializes in recording the everyday lives of ordinary people for the purpose of historical documentation. All documentation your team produces must be on film for archival purposes, but unfortunately, there is no budget for cameras. Your task is to work as a team to come up with an inexpensive way of taking photos using any assortment of household materials you choose. Your resources consist of the information housed in this Webquest, an assortment of photo papers or films, the office (this classroom) and any household materials you find. You will also have access to developing supplies. You may also use the pinhole cameras you have already built in class. As a team of Visual Engineers, your task is to determine a way of taking photographs without modern cameras. Use the information presented in this Webquest as background knowledge and inspiration for your own photographic devices. Once you have a firm grasp on all necessary information, work together and come up with a proposal for the CEO, complete with a design, construction plan, and a sample photo. Title Photo by Pointnshoot (CC)
  4. 4. <ul><li>1. Assign Roles: within the team, determine who is best fit for each of the following job descriptions: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Historical/ Cultural Expert : </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What is the history of the camera? How have they been used in the past? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2. Engineer/ Scientific Expert </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How do cameras work? What should we know about building out camera/ photo-taking device? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3. Secretary </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What should we remember? How will we execute our plan (write out process)? Record conclusions at the end. How does the product reflect the process? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>4 . Designer/ Art Director </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What should we take a picture of? How can our product reflect our process? What makes a good photograph? How have other artist allowed their process to dictate their product in terms of photography and types of tools used? </li></ul></ul>Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Step 2
  5. 5. <ul><ul><li>Read this overview of pinhole photography </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Break up information according to roles chosen by each group member. Follow links on words that you do not know or look them up on an online dictionary. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Historical/ Cultural engineer will focus on the history of the camera, what is it used for, how artists might utilize different photographical processes. What did the first photographers use their cameras to record? </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Engineer/ Scientific Expert will gather information on important aspects of construction. What important aspects of cameras make the process work? </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Secretary will record the building process, any important information that should be remembered later </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Designer/Art director will collect information on the way pinhole photos look, what should be considered when taking your own photos? Based on this method of photography, what sorts of information should you choose to record with your camera? What images would be most valuable with this form of photography? </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Step 3 Photo by Sicoativa (cc)
  6. 6. <ul><ul><ul><li>Check out these variations on the pinhole camera. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Multi-hole cameras </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Double-Slit Cameras </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Pinhole Sieve </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Zone Plates </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Re-loading disposable cameras </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Record any ideas or flashes of inspiration that come about as you read over these sites. How can you use these adaptations on your own pinhole cameras that you’ve already built? </li></ul></ul></ul>Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Step 4
  7. 7. <ul><ul><ul><li>Check out these variations on the pinhole camera. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Multi-hole cameras </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Double-Slit Cameras </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Pinhole Sieve </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Zone Plates </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Re-loading disposable cameras </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Record any ideas or flashes of inspiration that come about as you read over these sites. How can you use these adaptations for your own camera designs? </li></ul></ul></ul>Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Step 5
  8. 8. <ul><ul><ul><li>Check out what other artists have done with pinhole photography </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ann Hamilton </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Artist at work (see photos 12-24) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Website </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Pinhole Gallery </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.pinhole.com/gallery/bloomfield/1 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.pinhole.com/gallery/glorieux/1 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.pinhole.com/gallery/roth/1 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.pinhole.com/gallery/slepekis/1 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.pinhole.com/ </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.pinholeresource.com/shop/home </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.popphoto.com/photographynewswire/4036/photography-contest-won-without-a-camera.html </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Record any ideas or flashes of inspiration that come about as you read over these sites. What stood out? Why did these artists choose pinhole cameras as their means of communication? </li></ul></ul></ul>Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Step 6
  9. 9. <ul><ul><ul><li>As a team, brainstorm alternative methods of taking photos. Everyone should share a few ideas they found interesting based on examples and the work of other artists. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>It is the role of the secretary to record the brainstorming sessions while engineers and designers make sure to highlight important observations based on research </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Once you have developed an idea, write a detailed plan of how you will build your camera. Your plan should be specific enough that teams after you can build the same cameras. </li></ul></ul></ul>Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Step 7
  10. 10. <ul><ul><ul><li>Build your camera and take a photo. You may want to consider building more than one so you can take more than one photograph at a time. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Develop your film. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Analyze your results. Did the photo come out? Why or why not? What can you do to improve your technique? Are there other groups’ photos that came out better? What did they do differently? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Write a paragraph that discusses the outcome of your experiment. </li></ul></ul></ul>Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
  11. 11. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Evaluation CATEGORY 4 3 2 1 Preparedness Brings needed materials to class and is always ready to work. Almost always brings needed materials to class and is ready to work. Almost always brings needed materials but sometimes needs to settle down and get to work Often forgets needed materials or is rarely ready to get to work. Contributions Routinely provides useful ideas when participating in the group and in classroom discussion. A definite leader who contributes a lot of effort. Usually provides useful ideas when participating in the group and in classroom discussion. A strong group member who tries hard! Sometimes provides useful ideas when participating in the group and in classroom discussion. A satisfactory group member who does what is required. Rarely provides useful ideas when participating in the group and in classroom discussion. May refuse to participate. Time-management Routinely uses time well throughout the project to ensure things get done on time. Group does not have to adjust deadlines or work responsibilities because of this person's procrastination. Usually uses time well throughout the project, but may have procrastinated on one thing. Group does not have to adjust deadlines or work responsibilities because of this person's procrastination. Tends to procrastinate, but always gets things done by the deadlines. Group does not have to adjust deadlines or work responsibilities because of this person's procrastination. Rarely gets things done by the deadlines AND group has to adjust deadlines or work responsibilities because of this person's inadequate time management. Problem-solving Actively looks for and suggests solutions to problems. Refines solutions suggested by others. Does not suggest or refine solutions, but is willing to try out solutions suggested by others. Does not try to solve problems or help others solve problems. Lets others do the work. Attitude Never is publicly critical of the project or the work of others. Always has a positive attitude about the task(s). Rarely is publicly critical of the project or the work of others. Often has a positive attitude about the task(s). Occasionally is publicly critical of the project or the work of other members of the group. Usually has a positive attitude about the task(s). Often is publicly critical of the project or the work of other members of the group. Often has a negative attitude about the task(s). Quality of Work Provides work of the highest quality. Provides high quality work. Provides work that occasionally needs to be checked/redone by other group members to ensure quality. Provides work that usually needs to be checked/redone by others to ensure quality.
  12. 12. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Congratulations! You have successfully demonstrated your ability to take what you already know about photography and apply it in creative and meaningful ways! Based on what you’ve experienced through this mission, you should be well equipped to explore new methods of photography all on your own. Perhaps now you can do research on your own to find alternative ways of developing film or try experimenting with all different kinds of cameras. The possibilities are endless!
  13. 13. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Photos: Matt Callow: http://www.flickr.com/photos/blackcustard/2195345656/in/photostream/ Pointnshoot: http://www.flickr.com/photos/pointnshoot/70518248/ Sicoativa: http://www.flickr.com/photos/sicoactiva/2295899199/ The WebQuest Page
  14. 14. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Teacher Page A WebQuest for Photo 1 (8 th and 9 th Grade) Designed by Heidi West Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  15. 15. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Teacher Page The focus of this lesson is on the application of prior knowledge about photography in a collaborative setting. This lesson uses learning experiences already encountered through use of the pinhole camera for the purpose of creative thinking and problem solving. The students are rewarded for the hard work of more guided practice into the opportunity to really show where there creativity lies. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  16. 16. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Teacher Page This lesson was developed for a class at Lincoln IB World School studying the basics of photography. This differentiated classroom was comprised primarily of 8th and 9th graders with various artistic skills. Lincoln IB World School is also known for its high percentage of minority students. Prior to this lesson, students need to be familiar with the processes of pinhole photography and developing. They should have general knowledge of what makes a good photo and basic understanding about how photography works. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  17. 17. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Teacher Page <ul><ul><li>Standards: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Standard 1: Student recognize and use the visual arts as a form of communication </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Standard 3: Students know and apply visual arts materials, tools, techniques, and processes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Standard 4: Students relate the visual arts to various historical and cultural traditions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Standard 5: Student analyze and evaluate the characteristics, merits, and meaning of works of art </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Additional skills: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Collaboration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Critical thinking </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Creative production </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Creative Problem Solving </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teamwork </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Compromise </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Brainstorming </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Time Management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Accessing and applying prior knowledge </li></ul></ul>Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  18. 18. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Teacher Page (See Student pages for process) Day one : students will move through all research and brainstorming on day one. By the end of this day, students should have a strong idea of how they will construct their camera and what materials they will need. Day two : Students will complete their detailed construction plan and build their cameras. They should have enough time to begin taking pictures. Students should be building multiple cameras at once so as to fill time while photos are being exposed. Day three : if needed, allow an additional day for students to finish up taking photos and developing. They can also use this time to correct problems and re-test. Student should be divided into groups of four. Based on the class, students may choose their groups, or they may be systematically or randomly assigned by the teacher. It may be a good idea to assign groups based on ability due the specific roles of the assignment. Important skills for the teacher are very strong questioning skills. Especially during the brainstorming stages, students need to be guided through important inspirational ideas. Compline a list of questions appropriate to the class concerning interests, problem-posing, and problem solving. Variations: This lesson easily lends itself to variations. Simply by printing the pages as handouts, the assignment can be done without computers, or with limited computers. One option would be to set up stations of handouts, videos, and materials through which the students rotate as groups. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  19. 19. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Teacher Page <ul><li>Resources </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Computers with video and sound capability (one or two per group) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Film or photo paper </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Developing supplies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Household supplies as needed for each group </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Access to material for photographing </li></ul></ul><ul><li>This assignment is best implemented by two or three teachers who are able to circulate throughout the room, based on class size. The more teachers there are, the more effective it is to keep students on task and assist in important question-asking roles. If you chose to use the station approach, it is best to have a teacher/ aide at each station to answer questions and stimulate conversation about ideas. </li></ul>Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  20. 20. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Teacher Page (see evaluation rubric on student pages) The focus of this lesson is on risk-taking, collaboration, and problem solving. Formative assessments should be made throughout the project of how students are working together, who is participating successfully, ect. Based on the experimental nature of this lesson, it is likely that many photos will not be perfect. The important focus of this assignment is on how students respond to those mistakes and assessment of whether or not they are learning from their mistakes. Throughout the lesson, emphasize to students what you will be focusing on: Process v. Product. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  21. 21. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Teacher Page <ul><li>Possible questions to spur discussion/ ideas : </li></ul><ul><li>Are there any examples here that interest you? </li></ul><ul><li>Have you ever thought of making a camera this way? </li></ul><ul><li>What materials do you have in this room or at home that might make an interesting camera? </li></ul><ul><li>What effects are produced by certain camera modifications? What happens if you make more than one pinhole? What happens if the hole is not round? What will happen if you put something inside the light box? </li></ul><ul><li>Did you have any unexpected results with your regular pinhole cameras that you would be interested in pushing further? </li></ul><ul><li>The role of the facilitator will be to move students through the process. When you feel they have some good ideas or are interested in certain ideas, push them further to consider what they can do. Guide them through the planning process, asking them to consider important questions of construction. </li></ul><ul><li>When the students have completed developing their photos, ask them about what they did, what worked and what did not. Help them consider how they got certain effects and how they could change it or push it further. </li></ul><ul><li>At the end of the project, ask the students to engage in a class discussion about what they did. Each group should share the following with the class: </li></ul><ul><li>How they built their cameras </li></ul><ul><li>What happened in their photos </li></ul><ul><li>If nothing came out, they need to explain why </li></ul><ul><li>What would they do differently next time </li></ul>Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  22. 22. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Teacher Page This lesson falls within a natural progression of learning about the basics of photography. Students are given the opportunity in this lesson to demonstrate what they know about photography and apply it to something personally creative. Students take ownership of their own learning as well as experiencing a community of learners in their collaborative processes. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion

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