Goldenage english

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Spanish Golden Age: XVI-XXI C.

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  • Ingres, Jean-Auguste-Dominique, 1780-1867 - Golden Age - (1862)
    Elizabeth: The Golden Age is a 2007 sequel to the 1998 film Elizabeth, directed by Shekhar Kapur and produced by Universal Pictures and Working Title Films.
    The School of Athens, or Scuola di Atene in Italian, is one of the most famous frescoes by the Italian Renaissance artist Raphael. It was painted between 1509 and 1511 as a part of Raphael's commission to decorate with frescoes the rooms now known as the Stanze di Raffaello, in the Apostolic Palace in the Vatican. The Stanza della Segnatura was the first of the rooms to be decorated, and The School of Athens the second painting to be finished there, after La Disputa, on the opposite wall. The picture has long been seen as "Raphael's masterpiece and the perfect embodiment of the classical spirit of the High Renaissance."[1]
  • The concept of an American Empire was first popularized during the presidency of James K. Polk who led the United States into the Mexican–American War of 1846, and the eventual annexation of California and other western territories via the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and the Gadsden purchase.
  • Dichosa edad y siglos dichosos aquellos a quien los antiguos pusieron el nombre de dorados, y no porque en ellos el oro, que en esta nuestra edad de hierro tanto se estima, se alcanzase en aquella venturosa [edad] sin fatiga alguna, sino porque entonces los que en ella vivían ignoraban estas dos palabras de tuyo y mío. (I, 11, 113)
    The panel is one of nearly forty similar scenes from 'Don Quixote' which Vanderbank painted during the 1730s. They are related to but not direct replicas of the more than sixty illustrations, begun in 1723, which the artist drew for an edition of Cervantes's novel published by Tonson in 1738. It is not clear why Vanderbank painted this set over so long a period, but contemporary observers like George Vertue noted that he led a dissipated life and was constantly in debt. Vertue noted, however, that he was fortunate enough to have a landlord willing to have his rent paid in anything the artist cared to paint, in particular 'Storys of Don Quixot'.
    1900: Don Quixote of the Mancha. Re−told by Judge Parry. Illustrated by Walter Crane. London: David Nutt
  • Dichosa edad y siglos dichosos aquellos a quien los antiguos pusieron el nombre de dorados, y no porque en ellos el oro, que en esta nuestra edad de hierro tanto se estima, se alcanzase en aquella venturosa [edad] sin fatiga alguna, sino porque entonces los que en ella vivían ignoraban estas dos palabras de tuyo y mío. (I, 11, 113)
    The panel is one of nearly forty similar scenes from 'Don Quixote' which Vanderbank painted during the 1730s. They are related to but not direct replicas of the more than sixty illustrations, begun in 1723, which the artist drew for an edition of Cervantes's novel published by Tonson in 1738. It is not clear why Vanderbank painted this set over so long a period, but contemporary observers like George Vertue noted that he led a dissipated life and was constantly in debt. Vertue noted, however, that he was fortunate enough to have a landlord willing to have his rent paid in anything the artist cared to paint, in particular 'Storys of Don Quixot'.
    1900: Don Quixote of the Mancha. Re−told by Judge Parry. Illustrated by Walter Crane. London: David Nutt
  • Goldenage english

    1. 1. Questing for the Golden Age from Cervantes’s Spain to Today’s USA Harry Vélez Quiñones Distinguished Professor of Hispanic Studies
    2. 2. What is the Golden Age?
    3. 3. George Ticknor (1791−1871) and American Empire
    4. 4. Ticknor’s America at the Start of the XX Century A 1900 Campaign poster for the Republican Party with the motto "The American flag has not been planted in foreign soil to acquire more territory but for humanity's sake."
    5. 5. Ticknor’s Spain: The Spanish Golden Age
    6. 6. The Golden Age Speech − Don Quixote, I,11 (1605) John Vanderbank – Don Quixote Addressing the Goatherds – 1730 Walter Crane – Don Quixote and the Goatherds – 1900
    7. 7. The Golden Age Ovid – Metamorphoses – Book 6 • In the beginning was the Golden Age, when men of their own accord, without threat of punishment, without laws, maintained good faith and did what was right. . . . The earth itself, without compulsion, untouched by the hoe, unfurrowed by any share, produced all things spontaneously. . . . It was a season of everlasting spring.(3) Publius Ovidius Naso (43 BC−AD 17) Roman poet Luigi Deluise − 1840
    8. 8. Lucas Cranach the Elder − The Golden Age − 1530
    9. 9. 1492 Beginning of Spanish political, social, economic and cultural power Excelente (coin denomination) of Ferdinand and Isabella c. 1497−1520 • At the end of the middle ages, the totality of the Iberian Peninsula was under the authority of the Catholic Monarchs, Ferdinand and Isabella, after the capitulation of the last Muslim kingdom, Granada in 1492. That year some other decisive events took place: • The expulsion of an important religious minority: The Sephardi Jews The finding of vast and rich overseas territories: The New World The systematization of the Castilian language in the first in the first grammar of of its kind: Nebrija • •
    10. 10. Grammar of the Castilian Language Antonio de Nebrija •Nebrija said, justifying the usefulness of his Grammar in the Prologue, “has always been the companion of empire.” These words were remarkably prophetic, for Spanish soon became, of course, an imperial language with the “discovery” of America and with Spain’s expansion into northern Europe, just as Latin had been the great imperial language of its day.
    11. 11. The Catholic Monarchs Ferdinand II of Aragón (1452−1516) Isabel I of Castile (1451−1504) Juan Cordero Hoyos – Columbus Before the Catholic Monarchs – 1850
    12. 12. Charles V: King of Spain and Holy Roman Emperor (1500–1558) Emperor Charles V at the Battle of Muehlberg – Titian – 1547
    13. 13. Philip II (1527–1598) Titian – Philip II in Armor 1548 Sofonisba Anguissola – Philip II c. 1568
    14. 14. Spain in Europe and the World c. 1560
    15. 15. Philip III (1578–1621) Philip III, on horseback – Diego Velázquez – 1629−1635?
    16. 16. Philip IV (1605–1665) Philip IV – Diego Velázquez – 1655−1660
    17. 17. Charles II (1661–1700) Charles II of Spain Juan Carreño de Miranda – 1685
    18. 18. 1898: Ticknor and the End of the Spanish Golden Age? • In every country that has yet obtained a rank among those nations whose intellectual cultivation is the highest, the period in which it has produced the permanent body of its literature has been that of its glory as a state. The reason is obvious (. . .) Just so it was with Spain (. . .) Only a little more than a century elapsed before the government that had threatened the world with a universal empire was hardly able to repel an invasion from abroad (. . .) As a people, they sunk away from being a first-rate power in Europe, till they became one of altogether inferior importance (. . .) the earnest faith, the loyalty, the dignity of the Spanish people were gone . . . George Ticknor, History of Spanish literature (I, 419-433)
    19. 19. El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha (1605−1615)
    20. 20. The Golden Age Speech − Don Quixote, I,11 (1605) John Vanderbank – Don Quixote Addressing the Goatherds – 1730 Walter Crane – Don Quixote and the Goatherds – 1900
    21. 21. Jean−Charles−Léonard Simonde de Sismondi (1773−1842) •“He [Cervantes] stands foremost in that band of classical authors who cast such glory on the reigns of the three Philips, during the latter part of the sixteenth, and the commencement of the seventeenth century” •Historical View of the Literature of the South of Europe (1853)
    22. 22. Spanish Golden Age Literature • La Celestina (1499) – Fernando de Rojas • Bookends of the Golden Age • • • Lazarillo de Tormes (1554) – Anon. – [Don Quijote (1605 & 1615) – Miguel de Cervantes] El criticón (1657) – Baltasar Gracián Other Golden Age writers: • Garcilaso de la Vega − 1501−1536 • Teresa de Ávila 1515−1582 • Hernando de Acuña − c.1520−1580 • Luis de León 1528−1591 • Juan de la Cruz 1542−1591 • Luis de Góngora 1561−1627 • Lope de Vega 1562−1635 • Tirso de Molina 1579−1648 • Francisco de Quevedo 1580−1645 • María de Zayas 1590−1661 • Pedro Calderón de la Barca 1600−1681
    23. 23. Cervantes: Soldier and Poet Paolo Veronese - The Battle of Lepanto (1571) • • • • • • The son of a deaf surgeon, Miguel de Cervantes was born in Alcalá de Henares, near Madrid in 1547. He became a soldier in 1570 and was badly wounded in the Battle of Lepanto. Captured by the Turks in 1575, Cervantes spent five years in prison. He was freed in 1580 and returned home. Cervantes finally achieved literary success in his later years, publishing the first part of Don Quixote in 1605 and the second in 1615.. He died in 1616. Since his passing, Cervantes has been credited with writing the first modern novel. His work has inspired countless other authors, including Gustave Flaubert, Henry Fielding, and Fyodor Dostoyevsky.
    24. 24. A force de toujours lire... le pauvre gentil−homme perdit l'esprit. Horace Vernet (1822)
    25. 25. The Golden Age • Metamorphoses 1:113−122, Ovid (43 BC–17 AD) The golden age was first; when Man yet new, No rule but uncorrupted reason knew: And, with a native bent, did good pursue. Unforc'd by punishment, un−aw'd by fear, His words were simple, and his soul sincere; Needless was written law, where none opprest: The law of Man was written in his breast: No suppliant crowds before the judge appear'd, No court erected yet, nor cause was heard: But all was safe, for conscience was their guard.
    26. 26. Garcilaso de la Vega – (1503−1536) and his First Elegy
    27. 27. Hernando de Acuña (c.1520-1580) and his sonnet To the King our Lord
    28. 28. Cervantes (1547–1616) and his sonnet At the catafalque of Philip II in Seville
    29. 29. Garcilaso, Acuña, Cervantes and the Chivalric Ideal • Vittore Carpaccio • Portrait of a Knight (1510) • Museo Thyssen−Bornemisza, Madrid
    30. 30. The Plight of the Moriscos (1502−1609) Moriscos from Granada Arrival of the moriscos in Oran, North Africa – Vicent Mestre (1613)
    31. 31. The Plight of the Mexican and Central American Immigrants
    32. 32. Cervantes’s tongue in the USA
    33. 33. Hispanics and Cervantes’s Tongue in the USA • Hispanic educational attainment rose sharply from 2009 to 2010: The share of Hispanic 18to 24-year-olds who have completed high school increased to 73% in 2010 from 70% in 2009, and the share of young Hispanic high school graduates who are attending college increased to 44% in 2010 from 39% in 2009. • Although Hispanic youths have narrowed the gap in college enrollment, Hispanic young adults continue to be the least educated major racial or ethnic group in terms of completion of a bachelor’s degree. In 2010, only 13% of Hispanic 25- to 29-year-olds had completed at least a bachelor’s degree. In comparison, more than half (53%) of non-Hispanic Asian young adults have at least a bachelor’s degree, and nearly 39% of white young adults completed a four-year degree. The low college completion of Hispanic young adults partly reflects the lower schooling levels of Hispanic immigrants.
    34. 34. A New Golden Age
    35. 35. The End 35

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