Business Model Innovation Open Data

5,953 views

Published on

Presentation about the business model aspects of opening up data for archives, given at the SUN summer course in Budapest july 2012.

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
23 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
5,953
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
15
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
216
Comments
0
Likes
23
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • \n
  • Ask Audience: what is a business model?\n
  • Ask Audience: why is this important? why is this important for not for profit organisations like archives?\n
  • Ask Audience: why is this important? why is this important for not for profit organisations like archives?\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Ask Audience: what is a business model?\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \nkanaal: Flickr\n
  • \nkanaal: Flickr\n
  • \nkanaal: Flickr\n
  • \nkanaal: Flickr\n
  • \nkanaal: Flickr\n
  • \nkanaal: Flickr\n
  • \nkanaal: Flickr\n
  • \nkanaal: Flickr\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Ask Audience: what is a business model?\n
  • Ask Audience: what is a business model?\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • there are many ways for people to get access to their heritage\n
  • This is supplied to them through various channels, each with their own operating principles\n
  • The sphere where we are operating from has specific characteristics\n
  • The sphere where we are operating from has specific characteristics\n
  • The sphere where we are operating from has specific characteristics\n
  • The sphere where we are operating from has specific characteristics\n
  • The sphere where we are operating from has specific characteristics\n
  • The sphere where we are operating from has specific characteristics\n
  • If we look at this from a business model perspective, the following picture can be drawn: \n
  • For the past 5 years we have been focussing very much on the ‘supply side’\n
  • A huge amount of effort has been invested in setting up an aggregation ecosystem, standardisation and harmonisation of metadata. \n
  • A huge amount of effort has been invested in setting up an aggregation ecosystem, standardisation and harmonisation of metadata. \n
  • A huge amount of effort has been invested in setting up an aggregation ecosystem, standardisation and harmonisation of metadata. \n
  • A huge amount of effort has been invested in setting up an aggregation ecosystem, standardisation and harmonisation of metadata. \n
  • A huge amount of effort has been invested in setting up an aggregation ecosystem, standardisation and harmonisation of metadata. \n
  • A huge amount of effort has been invested in setting up an aggregation ecosystem, standardisation and harmonisation of metadata. \n
  • This doesn’t allow for publication as LInked Open Data...\n
  • This doesn’t allow for publication as LInked Open Data...\n
  • Or even Wikipedia\n
  • Or even Wikipedia\n
  • In order to investigate how opening up data fits our model it is necessary to change our perspective\n
  • In order to investigate how opening up data fits our model it is necessary to change our perspective\n
  • In order to investigate how opening up data fits our model it is necessary to change our perspective\n
  • In order to investigate how opening up data fits our model it is necessary to change our perspective\n
  • In order to investigate how opening up data fits our model it is necessary to change our perspective\n
  • To the ‘demand’ side\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • How do we cater to different end user communities who have different needs?\n
  • And will want to access this material through very different channels?\n
  • \n
  • If we want to do this, a necessary pre-condition is a change to the licensing model\n
  • \n
  • But how does this affect the business model of the participating institutions? \n
  • Ask Audience: what is a business model?\n
  • Ask Audience: what is a business model?\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Ask Audience: what is a business model?\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Ask Audience: what is a business model?\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Ask Audience: what is a business model?\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Ask Audience: what is a business model?\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Ask Audience: what is a business model?\n
  • Ask Audience: what is a business model?\n
  • Ask Audience: what is a business model?\n
  • \n
  • Ask Audience: what is a business model?\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Business Model Innovation Open Data

    1. 1. Business Model InnovationPolicies and practices in Archives Harry Verwayen July, Budapest SUN Course
    2. 2. 1. What is a Business Model?
    3. 3. “A business model is the logic ofan organisation to create value” See: Osterwalter & co, Business Model Generation
    4. 4. Why is this relevant to policy makers in archives?
    5. 5. The Business Model Canvas See: http://www.businessmodelgeneration.com/
    6. 6. Value Proposition Activities Relationship Resources Stakeholders Partners Channels Costs Benefits‘The business model describes the logic of our organization to create and deliver value’
    7. 7. 2. Case study:Nationaal Archief joins Flickr the Commons
    8. 8. The archive sectoraims to preserveour heritage andmake it broadlyaccessible
    9. 9. Digitization is apowerful tool toreach those goalsand create addedvalue. But how doesthis affect ourbusiness model?
    10. 10. We picked up the canvas and got to work
    11. 11. Here is the result...
    12. 12. The project made 400 photo’s of theNational Archive available on Flickr- The Commons
    13. 13. Why?
    14. 14. Why? Reach a larger audience
    15. 15. Why? Reach a larger audience create user- participation
    16. 16. Why? Reach a larger audience create user- participation (through social tagging)
    17. 17. Here’s how thismapped out on thecanvas:
    18. 18. The ‘old’ model looked something like this
    19. 19. The ‘old’ model looked something like this
    20. 20. The ‘old’ model looked something like this
    21. 21. The ‘old’ model looked something like this
    22. 22. The ‘old’ model looked something like this
    23. 23. The ‘old’ model looked something like this
    24. 24. The ‘old’ model looked something like this
    25. 25. Cost structure isclear. Value creation is subsidized
    26. 26. In the new model things had drastically changed
    27. 27. Open ContentIn the new model things had drastically changed
    28. 28. Open ContentIn the new model things had drastically changed
    29. 29. Open Content PlatformIn the new model things had drastically changed
    30. 30. Internet Open Content PlatformIn the new model things had drastically changed
    31. 31. Technology driven Internet Open Content PlatformIn the new model things had drastically changed
    32. 32. Technology driven Internet Open Content PlatformIn the new model things had drastically changed
    33. 33. Technology driven Internet Open Content PlatformIn the new model things had drastically changed
    34. 34. Technology driven Internetsocial tagging Open Content Platform In the new model things had drastically changed
    35. 35. Results: >1 million page viewsResults: >2000 comments Results: >14000 tags http://beeldenvoordetoekomst.nl/nl/news/evaluatie-pilot-nationaal-archief-joins-flickr-commons
    36. 36. the experiment shows thatphoto’s on flickr were viewed160 times as much as on our own site...
    37. 37. After evaluating the success, NAintegrated flickr into it’s regular activities.It published recently it gets 5000 visits onFlickr daily.
    38. 38. You see the point?
    39. 39. 3. Let’s watch a short film watch the film here: http://vimeo.com/36752317
    40. 40. 4. Case study 2:The Problem of the Yellow Milkmaid
    41. 41. The Rijks Museum found out that yellow copies of Vermeer’s Milkmaid became so persistent on theweb that visitors started to believe the original was a fake... See: White Paper, The Problem of the Yellow Milkmaid on pro.europeana.eu
    42. 42. At Europeana we used this as a case study toinvestigate the risks and benefits of pushing foropenly licensed metadata in the cultural heritage sector See: White Paper, The Problem of the Yellow Milkmaid on pro.europeana.eu
    43. 43. We started our investigation with ‘real people’ in mind: End User
    44. 44. We started our investigation with ‘real people’ in mind: End User
    45. 45. Who have many different ways to access our material... Access to Cultural Heritage End User
    46. 46. We looked at these as different spheres in a universe...Public Private(Europe) TEL books Europeana Athena Europeana Travel search scholar APEnet Access to Cultural Heritage (Netherlands)national Royal Library Communityarchive End User sound & vision wikipedia Public (France) (national) Commons culture.fr bibliothéque nacionale
    47. 47. Each with their own characteristics
    48. 48. Each with their own characteristics dPublicly funde ro p e l Agenda for EuSupport Digita ophyOp en Data Philos TEL Europeana Athena Europeana Travel APEnet
    49. 49. Which dictate the ‘logic of value creation’ (or business model) d el M o e ss in B us T he
    50. 50. We found that ours had very much been ‘supply driven’
    51. 51. We found that ours had very much been ‘supply driven’
    52. 52. As we had aggregated millions of objects and made them available through one specific interface b rary ch LI l Dut Roy a TE L APENET National Archive 2008-2011 e vrL ou rchief Drents a
    53. 53. As we had aggregated millions of objects and made them available through one specific interface b rary ch LI l Dut Roy a ea na Euro p CC TE L -B D Y -N ig ita C l APENET National Archive 2008-2011 e vrL ou rchief Drents a
    54. 54. While this had been an essential pre-requisite for access and distribution....
    55. 55. It did not allow for re-distribution through Linked Open Data...
    56. 56. Fast growing sites such as History Pin
    57. 57. Or even Wikipedia!
    58. 58. We felt we needed to change our perspective
    59. 59. We felt we needed to change our perspective
    60. 60. We felt we needed to change our perspective
    61. 61. To the demand side
    62. 62. It became clear that aggregation was still neccessary...
    63. 63. It became clear that aggregation was still neccessary...
    64. 64. But the portal setup didn’t cater to the needs of wildly differing customer segments...
    65. 65. Who have their own workflows and preferences for accessing information
    66. 66. The key to this was changing the licensing framework
    67. 67. But how does this affect the business model of our partner institutions???
    68. 68. What do you do?
    69. 69. We organised a series ofworkshop, this one with anemphasis on the risks &rewards of opening upmetadata
    70. 70. Here is what we found out:
    71. 71. All participants perceived 3 risks and 3 rewards of opening up data as mostimportant:
    72. 72. All participants perceived 3 risks and 3 rewards of opening up data as mostimportant:
    73. 73. All participants perceived 3 risks and 3 rewards of opening up data as mostimportant:
    74. 74. Creation of metadata can be found in 3 different places their businessmodels
    75. 75. 1. Metadata as a key activity
    76. 76. Basically...
    77. 77. Metadata is created as part of the mission of the institution tomake the material more accessible...
    78. 78. In this model, benefits quickly outweigh therisks
    79. 79. 2. Metadata as a key resource
    80. 80. Metadata is considered an asset used to improve the value of theobjects
    81. 81. Initially, risks seem to outweigh rewards...
    82. 82. But strong case studies, technical developments and differentperformance indicators would alter this equation...
    83. 83. 3. Metadata as a core value proposition
    84. 84. This one is the most difficult....
    85. 85. Metadata in this case is created as a value proposition byitself...
    86. 86. Directly generating revenue for theinstitution
    87. 87. Very few institutions make money this way,and over time, benefits will outweigh therisks
    88. 88. Very few institutions make money this way,and over time, benefits will outweigh therisks
    89. 89. What was the result of this excercise?
    90. 90. from september 1 2012 all europeanadata will be released with CC0 license
    91. 91. But we are not quite there yet...
    92. 92. We still need strong case studies that show the value ofopening up data, better metrics to measure success in adistributed online environment and technical developmentsfor identification and tracking. But above all, we need daringpolicy makers and cultural professionals who are willing totake a risk for the benefit of culture and society!
    93. 93. How about you?
    94. 94. What kind of innovation do you have in mind? Value Proposition Activities RelationshipResources StakeholdersPartners Channels Costs Benefits
    95. 95. Thank youHarry Verwayenharry.verwayen@kb.nl
    96. 96. But strong case studies, technical developments and differentperformance indicators would alter this equation...
    97. 97. Value Proposition Activities Relationship Resources Stakeholders Partners Channels Costs Benefits‘The business model describes the logic of our organization to create value’

    ×