services scoop 32013 EDITION
november 2012 edition
8	 Deutsche Gesellschaft für
Internationale Zusammenarbeit
9	 The New F...
4 services scoop 2013 EDITION
42SERVICES SUCCESS
43	 Move Over Willy Wonka
44 	 Testing, Testing 1, 2, 3
45	 What You Sow:...
services scoop 52013 EDITION
DarleneDuggan
Duggan International
Group helps companies
and government create
their visitor ...
6 services scoop 2013 EDITION
Sharleen Chin is the
CEO for Meiling Inc. Ltd,
responsible for publicity
and new business
de...
services scoop 72013 EDITION
EnaHarvey
Ena Harvey is the
Management Coordinator
- Caribbean Region &
Agribusiness Speciali...
8 services scoop 2013 EDITION
message
IwantedtobeginmythoughtswithaCaribbean
analogyof theprogressofthecoalitionsand
the C...
services scoop 92013 EDITION
message
The New Frontiers
importance of services, real, sustained action
at the macro level i...
10 services scoop 2013 EDITION
Dearreader,asLeadHeadofGovernmentwith
responsibilityforServicesintheCaribbean
Community(CAR...
services scoop 112013 EDITION
NegotiationswiththeEuropeanUniononthe
fundingoftheregionalservicesworkprogramme
havebeenadva...
12 services scoop 2013 EDITION
SERVICES MATTER
The services sector plays an integral role in the
functioning of any modern...
services scoop 132013 EDITION
SERVICES MATTER
Do We Really
Understand
the EPA?
By Lisa Cummins
Barbados Coalition of Servi...
14 services scoop 2013 EDITION
SERVICES MATTER
A Refresher
The example of rum comes to mind immediately as a
highly organi...
services scoop 152013 EDITION
SERVICES MATTER
Innovative Trade Policies for
These include initiatives to stimulate
investm...
16 services scoop 2013 EDITION
SERVICES MATTER
dependent on imported experts and technicians.
The industry changes have no...
services scoop 172013 EDITION
SERVICES MATTER
By Lucilla Lewis,
ICMS Ltd.
We all know that the
services sector is a
major ...
18 services scoop 2013 EDITION
SERVICES MATTER
States have transitioned from a dependence
on banana, sugar, rice and other...
services scoop 192013 EDITION
SERVICES MATTER
compile statistics on international trade in
services to better profile, mea...
20 services scoop 2013 EDITION
SERVICES MATTER
By Shalisha Samuel
Brown Mint Productions Inc.
The business with
the foresi...
services scoop 212013 EDITION
SERVICES MATTER
After viewing the beehive graph the below definitions should be easy to unde...
22 services scoop 2013 EDITION
SERVICES MATTER
3-Step Trademark Strategy
in Starting or Strengthening Your Business
01 Bus...
services scoop 232013 EDITION
SERVICES MATTER
that are franchises, for example Starbucks,
Days Inn, Subway or KFC, where a...
24 services scoop 2013 EDITION
SERVICES MATTER
Should've
Could've
but Didn't:
Failure to
Protect IP
Caribbean Examples
of ...
services scoop 252013 EDITION
SERVICES MATTER
Steel Pan
A patent application was filed by, and
granted, in 2001 to Hydro S...
26 services scoop 2013 EDITION
SERVICES MATTER
Annual
Services
Week5
th
By Michelle Hustler, GIZ
The Trinidad and Tobago C...
services scoop 272013 EDITION
SERVICES MATTER
for you here… Hilarious, ent?!
Other awardees include Mamatoto
Resource and ...
28 services scoop 2013 EDITION
SERVICES MATTER
Two simultaneous thoughts struck me at once:
1.	How was the TTCSI able to f...
services scoop 292013 EDITION
SERVICES MATTER
30 services scoop 2013 EDITION
SERVICES MATTER
Summit
Global Services
the “Really Good Friends of Services” (RGF)
group. C...
services scoop 312013 EDITION
SERVICES MATTER
in enabling the movement of goods in the
global value chain, forced localiza...
32 services scoop 2013 EDITION
SERVICES Coalitions
A service coalition is an organization of
stakeholders related to the s...
services scoop 332013 EDITION
SERVICES Coalitions
What is a service coalition and how do they differ in
developing countri...
34 services scoop 2013 EDITION
SERVICES Coalitions
However, a slightly different model has
emerged in developing countries...
services scoop 352013 EDITION
SERVICES Coalitions
concept for more than a decade prior, by early
2010 only four coalitions...
36 services scoop 2013 EDITION
SERVICE SECTOR HIGHLIGHTS
Antigua and Barbuda
The ABCSI was launched in February, 2011.
Wit...
services scoop 372013 EDITION
SERVICE SECTOR HIGHLIGHTS
It is anticipated that the CSRD will be
actively involved in the e...
38 services scoop 2013 EDITION
SERVICES Coalitions
FACILITATING THE
GROWTH OF THE
DOMESTIC SERVICES
MARKET
By Lisa Cummins...
Services Scoop Trade in Services Magazine 2013
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Services Scoop Trade in Services Magazine 2013

  1. 1. services scoop 32013 EDITION november 2012 edition 8 Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit 9 The New Frontiers: A message from the CNSC Coordinator 10 From the desk of the Prime Minister of Antigua and Barbuda 12SERVICES MATTER 12 Services Matter 13 Do We Really Understand The EPA 14 What is a Services Export 15 Innovative Trade Policies for Service Exporters 14 13 33 contents 17 Trade in Services Statistics 20 How and Why to Perfect Your Intellectual Property A Focus on Branding 24 Should've, Could've but Didn't: Failure to Protect IP 26 Trinidad & Tobago Coalition of Services Industries 5th Annual Services Week 30 Global Services Summit 32SERVICE COALITIONS 33 Services Coalitions An Overview of Experiences in the Caribbean & Africa 36 Coalition Updates 38 BCSI Charting a New Strategic Direction 41 Global Services Coalition Communiqué
  2. 2. 4 services scoop 2013 EDITION 42SERVICES SUCCESS 43 Move Over Willy Wonka 44 Testing, Testing 1, 2, 3 45 What You Sow: Jakes Farm to Table Dinners 46 The Meiling Story 67 Strategic Alliances 20 Reasons Why Establishing Credibility 10 Tips 68 Capitalizing on Innovations 70 A Successful Service Exporter's Buisness Card 72 Successful Services Exporting First Steps 54SERVICE SECTOR HIGHLIGHTS 55 Culinary Tourism Let's Get Cooking 58 Face The Music 60 Contract Research Organisations Developing the Bioscience Sector in the Caribbean november 2012 edition 66SERVICES SUPPORT 68 44 45 55 contents 52 Coalition Contact Details 53 EPA Contact Details 56 Editor’s Note Services Scoop is a publication by the Caribbean Network of Service Coalitions 48 TTCSI Align Private Fashion Showcase in London Tackling New Markets 50 Interviews With Designers 52 Market Entry Challenges (VISA) In Exporting to the EU 62 Down De Road to Opportunities Maximizing on Carnival 64 Experiential Tourism: Putting the 'Wow' in Your Business
  3. 3. services scoop 52013 EDITION DarleneDuggan Duggan International Group helps companies and government create their visitor experiences, and develops and implement marketing strategies. The company also specializes in international trade sales and business development in tourism, professional services, manufacturing and ICT. Company president, Darlene Duggan, plans to attend Caribbean Marketplace in the Bahamas, January 2013 and would like to meet with government agencies and tourism operators to discuss experiential tourism and marketing promotion. Contact darlene@ dugganinternational.ca/ www.dugganinternational.ca Lucilla has vast experience in providing technical assistance to clients in the private and public sector in the CARICOM region and wider Caribbean. She worked as an Assistant Secretary with the Government of Dominica, as Senior Economist with the Eastern Caribbean Central Bank and as Manager, International Business Unit with the Government of Dominica before she established her private consultancy firm, ICMS Ltd., in 2001. As an independent consultant she has worked with the CARICOM Secretariat in building capacity in the compilation of statistics in international trade in services. Contact her at lewisl2004@gmail.com. Tamira La Cruz, MBA, founder and CEO of MarkStra Caribbean, is a researcher and a consultant to global firms on corporate strategy, competitiveness and innovation. A business economist, she has a continuing interest in small state innovations and their monetization. She can be contacted via www.markstra.com, her Caribbean Research and Strategy blog, or tlacruz@ markstra.com. Managing Director of Brown Mint Productions (BMP) Inc. and budding attorney at law, Shalisha Samuel wears the crown of both a creator and a businesswoman. After composing music for 13 years, she launched BMP Inc., a publishing company and is currently building the catalogue and pitching to record labels. Her music is a melodic blend of her life in the Caribbean, NYC and Europe. At the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) she was responsible for developing strategic plans for Caribbean member states and coordinating projects for regional development through the use of intellectual property. TamiraLaCruz AndreaLivingston-Prince ShalishaSamuel LucillaLewis CONTRIBUTORS Andrea Livingston-Prince is a business expert with over two decades experience in the development of MSMEs. A Masters in Business Administration combined with training, project management, rural development, accounting and competitiveness training has served her clients well and will continue to do so with the usual attention to excellence. Business Works Limited has been supporting rural development and MSME initiatives since 1990 and is domiciled in Jamaica, USA and Belize. businessdon.weebly.com thebusinessadvisors@ gmail.com.
  4. 4. 6 services scoop 2013 EDITION Sharleen Chin is the CEO for Meiling Inc. Ltd, responsible for publicity and new business development. She is always on the lookout for innovative ways to get the brand to a global market and was instrumental in the ground breaking presence of the Meiling brand in virtual worlds. A journalist by training from the renowned Ryerson University in Toronto, she has over 25 years of experience in public relations, marketing, advertising, fundraising, event planning and sales. She is also a certified life coach and has given professional development workshops in Montreal, Toronto and Trinidad. Sharleen is also a director of the Meiling Model Boot Camp. Email: sharleen@meilinginc.com. Liesl Harewood is a Freelance Writer and Founder of Wasiné (https://www.facebook. com/WasineInfo), a social entrepreneurship network that facilitates business and trade development. Her articles have been published in the Barbados Business Catalyst, Zing and the Caribbean Entrepreneur Magazine. She can be contacted at liesl@wasine.org. Ms.LisaCummins is a formercareerdiplomatand servedatthe Headquarters oftheMinistryofForeign Affairsand ForeignTrade andintheBarbados EmbassyatWashington DC. Atrade professional bytraininganda specialist inInternationalTrade in Services,she servedas the TradePolicyAdviserforthe GovernmentofUganda as partofaCommonwealth Secretariat funded programme. She was leadadviserforUganda onTradeinServices andfortheEastAfrican Community inregional andEPAnegotiations. Shehasconsultedforthe WorldBank, UNCTAD, theEUandTradeCom. She iscurrentlythe Executive Directorofthe BCSI, the apexbodyresponsible for promotingcompetitiveness andservices exportingfrom Barbados. David brings almost 15 years experience working at the intersection of trade and development. Alongside broader strategic thinking and management, his work involves research and stakeholder facilitation primarily in the areas of trade policy formulation and negotiations in sub- Saharan Africa. His recent work touches on regional integration, aid-for-trade and notably trade in services (including the facilitation of enhanced engagement of the private sector). He is currently the Executive Director of the independent, not- for-profit International Lawyers and Economists Against Poverty (ILEAP). MichelleHustlerhas dedicatedthepast nine yearstotradein servicesandsmall businessdevelopment in CARICOM. Presently she iscontractedbythe GIZtoraiseawarenesson the importanceof services and servicescoalitionsat the regionallevel,support the regionalcoalition networkandprovide developmentalassistance tofledglingcoalitions. She is alsocontractedbythe CentreforDevelopment ofEnterprise(CDE), whereshesupportsthe Caribbeanregionaloffice throughenterpriselevel competitiveness-enhancing projectsacrossarangeof sectors. Michellecanbe reachedat michellehustler@ gmail.com. DavidPrimack MichelleHustler SharleenChin LieslHarewood LisaCummins contributors
  5. 5. services scoop 72013 EDITION EnaHarvey Ena Harvey is the Management Coordinator - Caribbean Region & Agribusiness Specialist in Agrotourism with IICA (InterAmerican Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture). She works with both the public and private sectors in Latin America and the Caribbean in identifying and developing new tourism sites and attractions in rural communities, and promoting trade of agricultural goods and services with the tourism sector. She can be contacted at ena.harvey@iica.int. TanyaChase-Henrycurrently servesastheExecutive AssistantoftheDominica CoalitionofServiceIndustries. Tanya’sprofessional careerspanssomeeleven years,commencingwith employmentintheaccounting field,aftercompletionof aB.Sc.Economicsand Accountingwiththe UniversityoftheWestIndies. Hervaluableinputasa foundingmemberofthe teamspearheadingthe implementationoftheDCSI intoDominica’sbusiness environment,canbeattributed toherexperiencegainedfrom herinvolvement withthe implementationofreform andchangemanagement initiatives,asProject Accountant,underthe WorldBankGrowthand SocialProtectionTechnical AssistanceProjectin Dominica. Originally from the French Caribbean island of Martinique, Florence Louis-Edouard shares a deep passion for the Caribbean as a whole and more particularly for its regional integration process. An international trade expert by training and experience , Florence has been working in various institutions dedicated to developing micro, small and medium sized enterprises since 2004. She has significant experience in the design and execution of projects across a variety of sectors to assist SME’s increase their export sales. She is currently residing in Trinidad and Tobago. Professor Chris Hillier is a successful technology entrepreneur and respected academic scientist with global experience of company spinout/start-up, business development, SME governance, IP management, product development, and market analysis. He is currently employed by the University of the West Indies to drive the innovation and entrepreneurship agenda at their Cave Hill campus in Barbados. James Lim is the Program Associate of CSI and has been involved in all of CSI's Global Services Summits. He holds a BA from Michigan State University and is currently pursuing a Masters of Public Policy with a specialization in International Security and Economic Policy from the University of Maryland- College Park. He is originally from Detroit, MI and presently resides in Washington, DC. James can be reached at lim@uscsi.org. ChrisHillier JamesLim TanyaChase-Henry FlorenceLouis-Edouard contributors
  6. 6. 8 services scoop 2013 EDITION message IwantedtobeginmythoughtswithaCaribbean analogyof theprogressofthecoalitionsand the CaribbeanNetworkofServiceCoalitions (CNSC) overthepast twoyears,yetmotorsport’s most famouswordskeepringinginmyears- “Gentlemen…start yourengines!” Thisexciting lastyear’sintroductionofGIZ’ssupporttothe regionalcoalitionshasbeenfollowedbyayearof buildingspeedandracingdownthetrack. FromDecember2010toDecember2012:the CNSCwasestablished,coalitionswereset-up lastyearinJamaica,DominicaandAntigua& BarbudaandthisyearinGrenadaandBelize, thealreadyestablishedcoalitionsinSaintLucia, BarbadosandTrinidadandTobagohavebecome morefocused,strongerandbettersupported,and coalitionsinGuyanaandDominicanRepublic arepoisedtolaunchintheimmediatefuture. TheGIZ,inanefforttofulfillitsmandatein theCaribbean,“toassistregionalandnational organizationsintheimplementationofthe EconomicPartnershipAgreement”byenhancing the“businessenvironmentforexport-oriented companies”,hasservedtherole,inthiscase,of thepit-stop,offeringthesupportandresources necessarytoensurethattheracecontinues speedilyalong. Over thecourseoftheyeartheGIZhas continueditsawarenessbuildingeffortswith respecttotradeinservicesandtheimportantrole thatthecoalitionsplaybymaintainingtheCNSC website,monthlynewsletters,Facebookpage andofcourse,themagazineyouarenowreading, ServicesScoop. TheGIZalsosupportedthe developmentofwebsitesforfourcoalitions and willbeextendingthesamesupportto two others intheupcomingmonths. TheGIZhasprovidedtechnical supportto coalitions,offeringthefledglingcoalitions the guidancerequiredtoensureaquickandseamless starttotheiractivitiesandwillcontinue to do so inthefuture. Theorganizationhasalsopartneredwith coalitionstosupporttheirvarious initiatives. For example,theGIZwasakeysponsorofTTCSI’s ServicesWeekandsupportedthe BCSI’s LEED CertificationinitiativeandEPAworkshops. While the GIZ’s programme was originally slated to end in December 2012, the value of the work accomplished has been recognized and an extension of the project has very recently been approved. Ilookforward,therefore,toanotherexcitinglap intheracetodevelopalongsideourregionalCSIs aninternationallycompetitiveservicessector. WTO Director-General: Pascal Lamy The global economy is being transformed at an unprecedented speed and at the heart of that transformation is the services economy. (...) Services underpin every part of the production process, from research and development to design, engineering, financing, transportation, distribution and marketing. In short, without services, there would be little value-added and innovation. China International Fair on Trade in Services, May 2012 Robert Glass Executive Project Manager, EPA Implementation Support Project Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusam- menarbeit (GIZ), www.giz.de Willkomen- Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)
  7. 7. services scoop 92013 EDITION message The New Frontiers importance of services, real, sustained action at the macro level is limited. Itishowevereasytofindaproblemfor everysolution. Suchanapproachisalsohighly unproductive. Itisthereforeuptous,individually andcollectivelytoploughthroughtheproblems, untietheknotsandtomakethingshappen! Inthatregard,wemustlookatourselves first. FromthelimitationswhichIhaveidentified, mostcanbeovercomebyserviceproviders themselves. So,notwithstandingalltheveryreal aforementionedconstraints,serviceproviders mustgetupanddo. Justasamusicianwillinvest innewinstruments,anITcompanyintraining andhardwareandayachtservicecompany inanewmarina,serviceprovidersmuststart includingexplorationofnewmarketsandmarket researchintheirbusinessplanning. Inhugeswathsoftheservicesector,thereisno substituteforpersonalrelationships. Inaddition, wecannotbefearfuloftheapparentoverwhelming sizeofexternalmarkets.Weshouldnottargeta marketasvagueas“theEU”oreven“Germany” oreven“Berlin”,wehavetobeabletofindthe rightpartner(s)fortherightmarketsegment. Onceweenterthemarket,wecangrow. Too often it appears that businesses lack self-belief, are risk-averse and see the exploration stage as a hassle and a distraction from their attempts to deal current issues and constraints. As a result, many opportunities to explore new markets go to waste. Running a business is no easy task. However, diversification of markets and A Message from the Coordinator of the Caribbean Network of Service Coalitions Mr. Nirad Tewarie revenue streams are critical to business sustainability. For this reason, the CNSC places much emphasis on tackling the challenge of business culture. The CNSC dedicates much energy to raising awareness, showcasing examples of success in order to inspire and motivate, highlighting opportunities and offering export- guidance – providing information and support. One specific thing that both the region and individual companies must work on however is the issue of branding. Many countries in the region are unknown in potential markets and our services are assumed to be low-quality. This in itself is a tremendous barrier to service exporting and needs to be addressed. Over the last year, we have seen the launch of several new Coalitions. In addition, the work of the existing Coalitions is beginning to bear fruit. Collaboration with both national and regional agencies involved in export promotion and service sector development is increasing. As we seek to build on these very positive gains the CNSC will continue to collaborate as a network and also with strategic partners to further develop the region’s services sector. In this regard, on behalf of the CNSC, I would like to say a special thank you to the GIZ for its continued support and valuable advice. Feel free to call on us at any time for assistance, advice or support. We look forward to working with you to take Caribbean businesses to the world! Warm regards, Nirad Tewarie This means that our role is to help companies do more business. We are business support organizations. Our task is therefore both daunting and exciting. It is a daunting task because service providers, except for a few, are not very outward looking. Moreover, they are up against a plethora of very real limitations. These include the difficulty in accessing financing, challenges in establishing credibility in new markets, weak policy frameworks, little knowledge of market opportunities, language barriers and poor cultural-understanding. While many in the region talk of the Nirad Tewarie Coordinator, Caribbean Network of Service Coalitions and Executive Director, Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Services Industries, http://c-nsc.org / www.ttcsi.org The primary goal of a service coalition is to assist in the expansion of the service sector.
  8. 8. 10 services scoop 2013 EDITION Dearreader,asLeadHeadofGovernmentwith responsibilityforServicesintheCaribbean Community(CARICOM)QuasiCabinet,it givesmegreat pleasuretobeassociatedonce againwiththiseditionoftheServicesScoop Magazineandthustoprovideyouwiththebroad scopeof developmentsintheregionalservices sectorfortheyear2012. Theyear2012wasquiteachallengingonefor the small,vulnerableeconomiesofCARICOM. The globaleconomicrecession,whichappears unwillingtogoaway,andthefirstandsecond stageeffectsof theinternationalfinancial crisiscontinuedtheirtollonallaspectsoflife in oursmallregion,especiallyinAntiguaand Barbuda. Internally,governmentscontinuedto behard-pressedtomeettheobligationsoftheir electorate,whileexternally,measurestakenby somegovernmentstoaddressfallingrevenuesare nowadverselyaffectingoursmalleconomies. I makespecificreferencetotheAirPassengerDuty imposedbytheUKandthenon-settlementbythe USAoftheawardtoAntiguaandBarbudainthe gamingdisputeattheWorldTradeOrganisation. Thesenotwithstanding,effortstomaintain stabilityoftheeconomiesarepayingoffinthe region. Inthisregard,thedifficultbutcritical workofdevelopingtheregionalregimefor servicescontinuedin2012andIwouldliketo highlightfiveareas. During2012,CARICOMMemberStates wereabletodistiltheelementsofaDraft RegionalPolicyfortheProvisionofProfessional ServicesintheCARICOMSingleMarketand Economy(CSME)andextensiveconsultations withtherelevantstakeholderswereheldinten MemberStates. Amongotherthings,thisdraft clearlydefinesaprofessional,makesprovision forindependentregulationandoutlinesthe requirementsandproceduresforregistration andlicensing. Theprincipalobjectiveofthe draftpolicyistofacilitatethefreemovement ofprofessionalsintheCSMEaswellasto harmonisethetreatmentofprofessionalsfrom thirdcountries. Thedatacollectionframeworkwasalso strengthenedin2012. ACommonCoreTrade inServicesQuestionnairewasdevelopedand independentlypilot-testedbyAntigua and Barbuda. Itwillberefinedandfurthertestedin sixMemberStatesin2013. Itisexpectedthat thisinstrumentwillenableCARICOMMember Statestoreportmoredetailedandtimelydata ontradeinservices. Theregional frameworkfor servicesstatisticsremainsweakandneeds the supportofboththepublicandprivate sectors. Threeregionalconferenceswere convened: TheSecondCARIFORUMInternational ConferenceontheFinancialServices Sectorinthe CaribbeanRegion(30-31August, 2012, Antigua andBarbuda),CreativeIndustries (14 September, Barbados)andtheRoundtableonPostal Sector Reform(13-14November2012,Guyana) respectively.Thesefacilitatedthe exchange of experiencesonvariousaspectsofreformnow takingplaceacrosstheglobeandthe preparation oftargetedstrategiestorespondto the rapidly evolvingexternalenvironment. InthecaseofFinancialServices, delegates examinedindetail,theemerging frameworkof governanceofinternationalfinance, the factors drivingsuccessinsmallfinancial centres, reviewednon-taxmodelsthatcouldbe appliedto theregionandconsideredtheelements ofa new architectureforthesector. In the case of Creative Industries, one of the outputs was a framework to develop a preliminary data set on the industry which would facilitate proper planning to harness its full potential. Prime Minister Hon. Dr. W. Baldwin Spencer Prime Minister of Antigua and Barbuda and Lead Head for Services in the CARICOM Quasi-Cabinet From the Desk of the message
  9. 9. services scoop 112013 EDITION NegotiationswiththeEuropeanUniononthe fundingoftheregionalservicesworkprogramme havebeenadvancedandarenowexpected tobecompletedbyyearend. Workonthe preparationoftheRegionalStrategicPlansfor FinancialServices,ICT,ProfessionalServices, EducationServices,TourismServices,Healthand WellnessServicesandCultural,Entertainment andSportingServicesarethereforeexpectedto commenceinJanuary2013andcompletedby December2014. Workisalreadyintraininthe areasofICT,CreativeIndustriesandProfessional Servicesandweshouldreapanearlyharvestin theseareasbyDecember2013. Ourlaboursintheareaofprivatesector strengtheningcontinuetobearfruit. The GrenadaCoalitionofServiceIndustrieswas launchedon29March2012andthisbringsthe numberofcoalitionsintheCSMEtoten. These coalitionsaresetupto,interalia;improvethe region’sperformanceintradeinservices. Iamconcernedthough,atthelevel of privatesectorinvolvementduringthese difficult economictimes. Threemajortradeinservices agreementsareenforcedforCARICOMMember States:theCSME;theGeneralAgreementon TradeinServices(GATS)oftheWorldTrade Organisation;andtheCARIFORUM-EU EconomicPartnershipAgreement(EPA). Iamnot convincedthattheprivatesectorofthe regionis fullyutilizingtheseagreementstocreate jobs and earnforeignexchange. Itakethisopportunity tocallontheprivatesectortoseizethese opportunities. Ifrestrictionsstillexistplease bringthesetoourattention. Iassure thatwe will findtheappropriatesolutions. Prime Minister Hon. Dr. W. Baldwin Spencer Antigua and Barbuda
  10. 10. 12 services scoop 2013 EDITION SERVICES MATTER The services sector plays an integral role in the functioning of any modern economy: • From the important social role that health and education services play in affecting the quality of life and skills of the labour force, • to the essential basic infrastructure created by construction, telecommunications, financial and energy services, • to the invaluable role transportation services play in supporting the traditional manufacturing and agricultural sectors, • as well as the value professional services impart in enhancing the competitiveness of any business – the services sector is the cornerstone of all economic activity. Recent statistics show that the services sector accounted for almost 71% of global GDP in 2010 and is expanding faster than either the agriculture or manufacturing sectors. Employment in services surpassed that of agriculture in 2001; about 60% of men and SERVICES MATTER 70% of women were employed in service industries in 2010. Yet while the services sector of Caribbean countries continues to grow in line with these trends, trade in services comprises only a very small portion of total international trade and is concentrated largely in tourism. Through the expansion of global markets from increased openness across all sectors, coupled with the context of the modern digital economy, the importance of the services sector has become even more profound. Effectively all services have become potentially tradable through the internet and supply and demand has become global. The foundation for actively developing the services sector and supporting services exports has been laid. M. Hustler and D. Primack. 2012. Harnessing Services Trade for Development: A Background and Guide on Service Coalitions in Africa and the Caribbean. Toronto: ILEAP (Background Brief No. 22)
  11. 11. services scoop 132013 EDITION SERVICES MATTER Do We Really Understand the EPA? By Lisa Cummins Barbados Coalition of Service Industries Concluded in 2008, the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) between the CARIFORUM and European Union (EU) states remains largely unimplemented. The possible explanations for the non-implementation will inevitably lead to the question of whether we understand the Agreement. The question of ‘understanding’ is challenged first by the non-implementation of the provisions of the Agreement, particularly our obligations - but if we consider that the region is persistently challenged with implementation in most areas, this point becomes less indicative of our level of understanding. It is quite possible that the EPA is just one in a long series of issues that we have moved slowly on. The more pertinent question to consider is, do we understand the larger picture? Do we appreciate the market dynamics driving global trade and our place in that context? Do we have the kind of private sector led, state sponsored, organized aggression that characterizes the trade and commercial policy of most successful trading nations, which in turn gives rise to innovation, market penetration and expansion of our goods and services? I would suggest we don’t. For the first time in our history, we have negotiated and concluded a reciprocal, preferential trade agreement. The EPA has been the first true test of our ability to handle our own without the covering of non-reciprocity. However, to date it is clear that we still don’t speak the same language of our successful competitors. The way in which we do business needs to change. Our current perception of business is a major hindrance and the EPA remains a casualty of our historical outlook on business and competitiveness. The Caribbean countries have to undergo, at all levels, a mindset shift that allows us to compete in a global market place with players who have been on the world stage for decades. The length of time it takes to make a decision in the region is far behind the world’s fast paced economies. A bureaucracy that doesn’t quite understand private sector activity complicates the ease of doing business. The reverse is the case for a private sector which is often woefully unaware of the policy environment within which they must function. All combined, we have a public and private sector that genuinely wants to do business and trade with our partners but needs significant structural and attitudinal change in order to operate at a level that is required to reach and maintain global competitiveness. Additionally, we have a foundational deficiency that we need to address. Our economies are made up largely of micro, small and medium sized enterprises (MSMES) which constitute the bulk of domestic production and employment.This is the group with the greatest potential to use the EPA and therefore must occupy our attention. But most MSMEs are not exporting to the EU. Most MSMEs are not versed in international trade and lack the capital to hire the human resources in this area. At the negotiation phase, although national consultations were held, there is no real indication that MSMEs had sufficient information or knowledge to articulate their interests, offensive and defensive, even through their business support organisations. In contrast, the larger firms were already exporting to the EU and were intimately involved in the negotiation of the agreement. ...do we understand the ‘larger picture’?
  12. 12. 14 services scoop 2013 EDITION SERVICES MATTER A Refresher The example of rum comes to mind immediately as a highly organized, focused and knowledgeable special interest group. There can be no question that they understand both the market and the Agreement and have successfully protected their defensive interests while securing offensive ones. Now that we are implementing the agreement, the same challenge remains. It is into this gap that development support must become a priority for business support organisations and government in an effort to bring MSMEs to where they can be fully integrated into the region’s export thrust. The Agreement contains a range of support measures designed to develop the capacity to trade.The region has also signed three financial agreements with the EC (European Commission) in support of regional integration to enable the CARIFORUM states to meet their commitments and make the most of the Agreement itself.These areas include fiscal reforms, Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) measures, trade in services, the removal of technical barriers to trade as well as capacity building. This developmental process should be our first step into utilizing the Agreement particularly for MSME’s. Some of this is already happening but we still need to go much further and faster. The mindset shift that is required can be a part of this development support as we expose both our policy makers, negotiators, private sector support organisations and business persons to best practices, the speed of doing business in more competitive economies and a business culture that spawns competitiveness. These are among the factors that will allow for the utilization of the EPA and any other subsequent trade agreement which the region signs either with traditional and particularly with non-traditional partners. The Caribbean countries have to undergo, at all levels, a mindset shift that allows us to compete in a global market place with players who have been on the world stage for decades. What is a Services Export? By Tanya Chase-Henry, Dominica Coalition of Service Industries The export of services comprises all services rendered by residents of a country to non-residents of the respective country. The World Trade Organization (WTO) in its General Agreement on Trade and Services (GATS) defines and classifies services exports using a four-pronged approach. A service is exported when it is supplied in one or more of the following ways: Mode 1: Cross Border Supply-Theexportof servicescomprisesallservicesrenderedbyresidentsofa countrytonon-residentsoftherespectivecountry. Example-theprovisionofmedicaltranscription servicesbyacompanybasedinAntigua,viatheinternet, foramedicalfacilitylocatedintheUnitedKingdom. Mode 2: Consumption Abroad - the domestic service supplier provides a service in the domestic market to a non-resident consumer. In this case, the service consumer has moved into another country to obtain a service. Example–aresidentofBarbadosvisitingDominica toreceivetherapeuticmassageservicesfromalocalspa. Mode 3: Commercial Presence-aservice providerestablishesabusinessinanoverseasterritory toprovideservicestheoverseaslocation. Inotherwords, theserviceproviderestablishesaterritorialpresence, bymeansofownershiporleaseofpremisesinanother territory,otherthanhisbasecountry. Example - a company legally registered in Saint Lucia, offering accounting services, establishes a branch in Germany to offer similar accounting services to Germans. Mode 4: Presence of Natural Persons-the physicalmovementoftheserviceprovidertoprovidea serviceinanothercountryonatemporarybasis. Example - a management consultant who leaves his resident country of Anguilla to work in Grenada as a management consultant for a human resource audit project.
  13. 13. services scoop 152013 EDITION SERVICES MATTER Innovative Trade Policies for These include initiatives to stimulate investments in new technologies, improve the business environment, secure market access, ensure that the industry’s skills requirements are met and provide access to financing, particularly for SMEs. The focus is understandable, goods account for over 65% of EU’s exports, as well as 80% of EU’s investment in research and development. In CARIFORUM, however, manufacturing continues to decline. This is not necessarily an indication of an overall economic worsening in the region. Many countries can stake a claim to rising above the challenges that the global economic meltdown has brought through the force of their services sector. Unfortunately,theeffortswithrespectto the development of theservicessectortodate have focusedalmost entirelyonthetourism sector. Totrulyengendermeaningfulgrowth, CARIFORUMgovernmentsmustpursueactive considerationof theservicessectorasawhole, includingthekeysubsectorsandplayersinthese subsectors,investment initiatives,theappropriate macroeconomicmodel,linkagesbetweenthe sectorandotherregionalpriorityissuessuchas environmentalsustainabilityandsoforth. There is a need to formalize this sector through the undertaking of foundational initiatives such as an appraisal of the current state of the sector, consultation with the private sector, including a needs assessment, establishing an inclusive micromanaged watch By Andrea C Livingston-Prince, Management Consultant, Business Works Limited Service Exporters and establishing a communication strategy to ensure continuous dialogue amongst all relevant parties. The governmental challenge that would be faced should such action be undertaken is identified by the McKinsey Center for Government in their October 2012 publication. “A new era in public management is under way. Governments everywhere confront major demographic, technological and social change, even as they must do more with less to ensure their citizens' prosperity, health, and security. To succeed, they must raise their institutional intelligence and capabilities to bridge the public, private, and nonprofit sectors in ways never attempted before.” Thepublicationhighlightstwocriticalpoints: • The call for greater engagement and empowerment of citizens and; • The understanding that only systemic change, as opposed to incremental reform, will allow government to keep pace in a rapidly changing world. If we analyze the anatomy of these statements, we will find that they call for a new methodology in constructing our trade policy reforms in order to enact maximum impact on the services sector. This new methodology should include increased quality research, enhanced communication mechanisms, reduced formalized structures between the sectors and the policy makers, improved use of documentation tools ranging from digital recorders to camcorders, enhanced accountability mechanisms, deeper linkages between policy and practice, increased dialogue between stakeholders in systematic and pragmatic way, increased linkages between educational institutions and the service sector, development of a wider network of research practitioners, deeper and expanded role for a research model within trade policy development units of governments and development of an ICT-based communication model for policy development within the region. Based on experience in managing a management consulting firm for over 2 decades and serving varied developing states, being a member of the JamaicaTrade Adjustment Team, serving the Small Business Association of Jamaica and working with the Ministry of ForeignTrade in Belize, I have devised four trade policy shapers that I believe can propel the services sector forward. Services Network Policy (SNP): The Services Network Policy would be based on four pillars of engagement: the services sector, the public sector, research initiatives and investment forces. Key to this policy would be a need for more deliberate and strategically managed industrialized and science and technology-based trade initiatives implemented in-country. Examples of this would include the revision of manufacturing processes, standards, trends or farming technologies. The related changes would create new skills, knowledge and aptitudes and therefore immediately result in service sector changes. Within the construction industry, for example, sewage treatment has seen recent innovative introductions, however the sector is The European Union, through the European Commission, has recently proposed a number of initiatives designed to enhance the manufacturing sector.
  14. 14. 16 services scoop 2013 EDITION SERVICES MATTER dependent on imported experts and technicians. The industry changes have not impacted the supporting services sector. The proposed policy would govern the direction of trade agreements and would require that regulations and procedures undergo deeper qualitative analyses by the policy makers. A consistent and well-mangedTrade Adjustment Team devoted to the sector would be required for this policy to reap optimal impact. Competency- Led: Sector Skill Councils are centers for sub- sector development. The SSC is a country’s method of strategically managing the development and strengthening of a sector through its people.This is especially important as sectors may be easily undermined through weakened offerings by its service providers. The Competency-Led Policy considers knowledge, attitude, aptitude and skills required for service-providers and may place sector skill councils at the helm of all policy development for the service sectors. Gender-Based Trade Policy (GTP) The proposed GTP has its roots in developing government sector policies and regulations based upon gender roles. For example, consider a matriarchal society where adult females are the bread-winners of the family, now consider the policies that would be more effective in such a context. The drawback to this proposal is its exceedingly heavy reliance upon periodic anthropological and economical statistical research and analyses. Its advantage is its relevance in nations and regions where there is a heavy change in the population by gender, e.g. decline of employable males over the age of 18. Though research in and of itself is valuable, the type, quality and analysis of the research is critical to the success/relevance of a policy. Metrics such as gender trends must always be incorporated into small states’ management research, policies and regulations. Body of Knowledge Focused The final proposal for a service sector focused trade policy would be the BOK. This is so named for its heavy focus on implementation based upon the uniqueness of each Body of Knowledge. Examples might include fields such as Geology, Anthropology and Sociology (culture), Technology - Management Information Systems (MIS),Technology – Engineering, Mechanical andThought Systems, Aeronautical and Aerospatial and Industrialisation. These fields’ local and international body of knowledge would serve to drive, support and offer support to the service sectors.This would generally include training, consulting, value-added product design, marketing and development, process and strategy design support, project development, project management, programme support, business start-up, product development, network management, etc. Stimulation would take place by implementing strategic management and oversight machineries that leverage measures which incorporate incentives to local and foreign investors through trade mechanisms. Sustainability It is important for us to bear in mind that being small makes us more vulnerable to climate change issues. Greater and improved management of climate change creates the opportunity for numerous new industries and professions for states. These may be driven by specialized experience within existing roles, new and advanced training, professional certification, research findings, applied creativity, compliance with international standards, local standards development processes and creativity, general innovation and strategic response to cultural forces. This multi-virate would have an accompanying benefit of increasing education and linkages between the state and the global and regional agenda, thereby increasing the quality and level of information about climate change on both urban and rural communities. These policies would attract investment, strengthen governance, broaden reach and improve and increase impact, what else could our small states want?
  15. 15. services scoop 172013 EDITION SERVICES MATTER By Lucilla Lewis, ICMS Ltd. We all know that the services sector is a major contributor to economic activity globally. In this global framework, Caribbean countries continue to identify the services sector as a key contributor to sustainable economic growth. This increasing significance of and dependence on services in the region is attributable to several factors including: • An expanding global inclination of cross- border trade in services ushered in by information communication technology (ICT); • The development of a conceptual framework under the World Trade Organisation’s (WTO), General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) with rules and guidelines for regulating international trade in services; • As a result of technological developments and GATS, a trend has been established for the inclusion of services in free trade agreements (FTAs) negotiated within and among trading blocs – in the Caribbean, the CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME), the European Commission (EC) CARIFORUM Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA), the Caribbean Canada Agreement (CARIBCAN), the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI) with the United States of America (USA), as well as several other FTAs entered into with trading blocs in Latin America; • Loss of preferential market access for traditional exports and the need for economic diversification; • Evidence of the Caribbean region’s comparative advantage as a supplier of tourism services and the perception of strong growth potential of other services. Tourism services have served as the primary contributing sector in the economies of several CARICOM Member States. In recent years, more Member Statisticsfor Services Development Trade in Services You can’t manage what you can’t measure
  16. 16. 18 services scoop 2013 EDITION SERVICES MATTER States have transitioned from a dependence on banana, sugar, rice and other primary exports to tourism as well. Private and public sector stakeholders in the region, donors and friendly Governments have invested substantial levels of resources in product development and capacity building in this sector. These investments over the years however, have not paid enough attention to development of the statistical database to measure the impacts of the sector. The situation is that, while most countries compile arrival statistics and rough estimates of direct expenditure by tourists, the information on direct and indirect employment, revenue accruing to Central Government, ownership and financing profile of the sector, etc. is very sparse. The result is that policy and investment plans for the sector are being designed and implemented with inadequate and incomplete statistical information. For that matter, very few Member States compile the Tourism Satellite Accounts (TSA) to capture a more holistic assessment of the impacts of tourism on sustainable economic development. The situation gets worse when it comes to measuring impacts of the other services identified by the region to have strong growth potential, especially within the FTAs being entered into. In this regard, a cursory review of statistical publications by Member States reveals that in the external accounts, in most cases, data is not available for cultural and entertainment services, professional business services, construction services or charges for use of intellectual property. This scenario poses challenges, it also presents an opportunity. The post WTO GATS trading environment has ushered in increasing demand for statistics on trade in services which has resulted in the rolling out of an integrated framework with conceptual guidelines to guide countries globally in the compilation of statistics on international trade in services. In this regard, the first Manual on Statistics of International Trade in Services (MSITS) was published by the UN in 2002 with the revised Version MSITS 2010 published in 2011. The Caribbean region is therefore presented with an internationally endorsed framework within which to develop and These statistics would also serve as a vital tool to agencies involved in regulating and facilitating foreign investment and to trade negotiators in the preparation of negotiations of FTAs.
  17. 17. services scoop 192013 EDITION SERVICES MATTER compile statistics on international trade in services to better profile, measure, quantify and forecast the services activities which are increasingly being targeted as key growth and development engines. MSITS, by listing compilation activities in order of priority and providing a metadata section, allows countries to implement recommendations within their resource constraints and to address any country customization necessary in the metadata. The pace at which this opportunity will be seized by countries will depend, as MSITS envisages, on resource availability, but also, in the view of the author of this article, on the level of appreciation by stakeholders, especially policy makers in the public sector and data providers across sectors, of the importance of statistical information in business, policy and development planning. It is those two factors which challenge the region’s ability to adopt the MSITS framework for better measuring the impact of services on sustainable economic development. Central Statistical Offices (CSOs) which are already pushed to their limits compiling basic economic statistics – national accounts, consumer price indices, trade statistics, the balance of payments in some cases in collaboration with the Central Banks, have increasingly been assigned responsibility for compilation of social statistics in the context of the 2015 target for achieving the Millennium Development Goals, are now required, with little or no additional resources in most cases, to compile statistics on international trade in services within the MSITS framework. The MSITS framework involves: • Compilation of the Extended Balance of Payments Services Classification (EBOPS). This is generally compiled in collaboration with the Central Banks. EBOPS is a more detailed presentation of the Services Account of the Balance of Payments (BOP); • Compilation of statistics on Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) inflows and outflows e.g loan capital, equity capital, interest, dividends and reinvested earnings. In some cases this is compiled in collaboration with the Central Banks as some of the flows of FDIs are already captured in the BOP; • Compilation of Foreign Affiliates Statistics (FATS). FATS are FDIs which are more that 50% foreign owned and it is the vehicle through which most of the capital movements within and between trading blocs is expected to occur. MSITS recommends the following priorities, among the other FATS variables to be compiled, based on Standard Industrial Trade Classifications (SITC): • Employment • Value added • Exports of goods and services • Imports of goods and services • Number of Enterprises • Compilation of statistics on the GATS 4 Modes of Supply. Clearly, the above statistics if compiled would provide much needed information for policy making and development planning in services dependent economies. These statistics would also serve as a vital tool to agencies involved in regulating and facilitating foreign investment and to trade negotiators in the preparation of negotiations of FTAs. The current baseline with respect to availability of statistics on international trade in services in the region, to be used to inform design of sector strategies, negotiations and assessments of FTAs, and growth and development planning, is grossly deficient despite past initiations led by the CARICOM Secretariat and supported by donor agencies including CIDA, USAID and the EU. These efforts need to be better complemented by efforts at a national level if results achieved are to be sustained. Discussions of national budgetary allocations to the Central Statistical Offices in Member States must therefore be held within the context of ensuring that these offices are adequately resourced to sustainably deliver on their increasing mandate to produce statistics on which efficient development planning and effective implementation of development strategies rely. Without statistics on international trade in services our assessment of the impacts of FTAs is greatly limited!
  18. 18. 20 services scoop 2013 EDITION SERVICES MATTER By Shalisha Samuel Brown Mint Productions Inc. The business with the foresight and vision to use their intellectual property (IP) assets as a means to propel their service or product have even greater prospects for success and longevity. What is IP? IP is an idea that has been transformed into sight, touch, sound and even smell which when protected under law, grants exclusive rights to the creator/owner. The painting in your head is simply an idea; the painting on a canvas may be your personal property, but like any other personal property, it can be taken/used without your permission. The painting on canvas, once exclusive rights are granted, is your intellectual property. Intellectual property grants legal ownership of intangible assets. “Intellectual”becauseitisthecreationofyour intellectand“property”becauseitlegallybelongs tothecreator/owner. In our knowledge-driven society, IP are intangible assets that are highly valued while tangible assets such as machinery rapidly devalues over time. The first generation iPod has a low selling rate, but ownership in the iPod trademark has a high value. The below beehive graph lists a number of IP categories. A product/service can attain protection in one or more of these areas. The length of protection varies according to the type of protection. Always bear in mind that these rights also vary according to jurisdiction, therefore, due diligence and research is paramount on your part as a business owner exploring new markets. A simple way of understanding the sub-categories is with association of well-known products or services. How and Why to protect Your Intellectual Property A Focus on Branding
  19. 19. services scoop 212013 EDITION SERVICES MATTER After viewing the beehive graph the below definitions should be easy to understand. Each protection grants an exclusive right to the creator to use/commercialise and to prohibit the unauthorized use by others. How is IP relevant to my Business? Businesses typically incorporate IP into their strategy and vision as the business matures or as a response to IP losses: • a former employee is now bottling a pepper sauce that tastes just like yours because they know your secret ingredient (trade secret); • a former freelance graphic artist is now selling your client’s artwork because she believes it is her right (copyright/ trademark/industrial design) Could these examples happen to you? How can a Trademark bring Growth to my Business? Trademark: A Trademark is a sign or combination of signs (word, letters, design, logo) that distinguishes a product or service from others to avoid confusion and to increase recognition and competitiveness. It prevents others from selling or distributing a product or offering a service with a similar trademark that can mislead buyers. In filing your application, you must select the class of protection by firstly identifying whether your business provides goods or services and then selecting from the list in each category. Do you sell furniture (trademark) or do you simply set up furniture (servicemark)? Copyright: Protects literary and artistic works (books, films, songs etc.) and computer/software programmes. Term of protection is life of author +50 years after death (in U.S.A and Europe it is +70 years after death). Trademarks: Protects distinctive signs (words, letters, designs, logos) used to identify a product or service. Term of protection is 10 years in most countries but can be renewed indefinitely. Failure to use a trademark can result in it being an obsolete/dead mark. Patents: Protectsnewandinnovative productsorprocesses.Termofprotectionis 20years. Industrial Designs: Protects the physical/aesthetic appearance of a product. Protection is offered initially for 5 years, which can be renewed up to at least 10 years. Countries can therefore offer renewals up to 10 or 25 years for example – please check your local legislation/IP Office. Geographical Indications: Protects products originating from a particular region/country in which factors unique to the production in the region/country (climate, soil or special skills of the people) speaks to the quality of the product. Examples are Cognac from Cognac, France; Scotch whisky from Scotland and; Parmigiano-Reggiano (parmesan cheese) originating from a few select regions in Italy. This type of protection is offered on a collective and not an individual basis and therefore does not belong to a person or firm. Geographical Indication: Champagne from the Champange region in France Trademarks: TIDE/ VISA/Clarks/ Tylenol Copyright: Books/Films/ Isaac Blackman's song “Jumping up to the Ceiling” Industrial Design: Volkswagen Beetle/iPad/ Coca-Cola bottle Trade Secret: WD-40/Google's search algorithm/ KFC/Coca-Cola formula Patents: Apple store's staircase/iPhone/ mp3 player/ breastfeeding shirts
  20. 20. 22 services scoop 2013 EDITION SERVICES MATTER 3-Step Trademark Strategy in Starting or Strengthening Your Business 01 Business Name/Registration Your business name could ultimately be your trademark, therefore, thorough consideration of the name is critical in building your brand. Online research for checking whether your desired business name is not already in use is usually the first step. You can also visit the websites of countries that have online trademark databases such as the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) to carry out a simple search. The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) also has an online database of trademarks that were registered internationally under the Madrid System. Additionally, translate the name, if possible, in other languages and dialects to avoid a business name that is offensive or the cause of stares and laughs. Chevrolet, for example, had trouble marketing their Nova vehicle in Latin America, because “no va” in Spanish means “it doesn’t go”. Names incorporating the name of a town or neighbourhood may limit your reach to trade internationally. Once you have developed a brand in your home base, it is wise to continue using this brand, as you would otherwise have to rebuild brand recognition and regain customers. Once you feel confident that your business name is unique, you can register the business name and receive approval. Please note that your registered corporate name does not have to be your brand or the name known to consumers. You can start a company, “John Smith Investments Inc.” listing the sale of aromatherapy products as the nature of the business. JSI Inc. could own the trademarks to the various essential oil brands and products. If the brand fails, the company survives and creates another brand! 02 Logo Avoid similar colour schemes, fonts, sizes and shapes as your competitor. Any design that may cause confusion would be difficult to register. Conduct research in prospective markets abroad. It would be obvious to some why a fast food restaurant should avoid entering the Barbados market with a purple and yellow colour scheme. As an entrepreneur, you should have a vision for your business. In two years or three months, you may want to export your product or service to Canada but if you, as an advertising agency, bear the same or very similar name/logo/ unique colour scheme to an advertising agency in Canada, there may be a challenge in registration and chances are, the exclusive right to use the trademark, would not be granted. 03 Website Your domain name should ideally be the same or at least a shortened version, of your brand/business name. Similar to determining the name for your business, you should visit websites of domain name providers to carry out a search on whether the name is taken. If your name is Junior and you make the best cheesecake in Dennery, St. Lucia, you won’t be able to register www. juniorscheesecake.com as your domain name because the site is owned by a company that was established since 1950. A website is an important tool in promoting your brand/your business name, and therefore clearance should be made on the availability of a domain name prior to registering the business name. The content on your website is also protected by copyright. Overall, be creative – a unique name optimizes search engine results and would exclude unrelated results. Some rules do apply If you sell apples you cannot receive a trademark approval for “Apples Incorporated” because your company’s name cannot directly describe your product. Secondly, if you are an accountant, you cannot receive a trademark approval for “Accountants Inc.” because accounting is a general term that cannot be a trademark. “Samantha’sYummy Apples” or “Joy’s Accountancy Firm” are both acceptable Trademarks however. Trademarks are territorial (governed by domestic laws); protection in Dominica does not equate to protection in Grenada. If you’re thinking ahead, you’ve guessed right – if you want to be protected in Grenada as well, you will have to visit the IP office there and apply for trademark protection. The Madrid System of WIPO provides a service to countries in which businesses can select up to 89 countries* where they seek to have their trademark protected. Antigua and Barbuda is currently the only regional member of the Madrid Union, which allows for international registration of marks. Registering your trademark locally usually involves registration, search, publication, agent and other fees. Call your local intellectual property office for a breakdown of the procedures and costs involved. Move Beyond Protection to Commercialization Protection is the first phase of engaging your business with IP, but for it to stimulate growth, your IP should be commercialized. You can exploit the rights of a new device you developed by applying for and being granted a patent and then making the device available for sale, for example. Alternatively, you may license your new technology or smartphone application to a company with the budget to market and sell the product. If you’re a songwriter, you may license the use of the songs you wrote to a record label. A similar method is applied to well-developed brands
  21. 21. services scoop 232013 EDITION SERVICES MATTER that are franchises, for example Starbucks, Days Inn, Subway or KFC, where a franchise fee is paid for the use of the brand. Inessence,awell-managedIPportfoliomakes yourbusinessmoreattractivetoinvestors,as revenueisexpectedtoflowfromtheexploitation ofthecompany’sintangibleassets. Take Action! Have the conversation today with yourself, your mentor and your business partner(s) today to identify the IP assets of your company and determine how to protect them. Protection of assets is the first phase of a company incorporating IP in their business strategy, Maintenance involves the use of the brand and payment of renewal fees. Exploitation for commercialization is the optimal goal. Be mindful of the vision you have for the company and embrace the usefulness of acting now to establish a foundation for a competitive and sustainable business. *TheMadridUnionhas89memberstatesasof November15,2012.
  22. 22. 24 services scoop 2013 EDITION SERVICES MATTER Should've Could've but Didn't: Failure to Protect IP Caribbean Examples of Demerara Sugar of Guyana and the Steel Pan of Trinidad & Tobago Demerara Sugar Two well-known cases touch upon the “Demerara” name, although neither case arose as a direct result of IP infringement. In Anderson v Britcher (U.K, 1913)1 sugar from Mauritius was sold as Demerara sugar originating from Demerara, Guyana. The buyer argued it was not genuine sugar from Demerara, however the court ruled that “Demerara” is a generic term used to describe brown, crystalised sugar made from sugar cane and bears no indication to the region in Guyana. In the second case of Bedessee Imports Ltd. v Guyana Sugar Corporation Inc. (Canada, 2010)2 , Bedessee Imports Ltd., packaged and distributed sugar made in Mauritius under the brand “Demerara Gold”, a Bedessee’s registered trademark “since at least 1984”3 , while another sugar was packaged with the map of Guyana. When the Guyana Sugar Corporation Inc. (Guysuco) sought to register the trademark “Demerera Gold” in Canada, Bedessee filed an opposition and then submitted an application for registration of the same name, which was later opposed by the Government of Guyana. Guysuco withdrew from the application process. Following this, the Government of Guyana (Minister of Agriculture, et al) then made, what Bedessee considers to be, defamatory statements. The case therefore is one relating to defamation and diplomatic immunity in which the court, including the appellate court, dismissed Guyana’s claim to immunity thereby allowing Bedessee to file a suit against the Minister. If steps were made years ago from producers in Guyana and the Government for a geographical indication (GI), the more recent 2010 Canadian case may have resulted differently. There still exists hope By Shalisha Samuel Brown Mint Productions Inc. Demerara Sugar of Guyana and the Steel pan of Trinidad and Tobago are great Caribbean examples of the importance of prompt Intellectual Property (IP) protection.
  23. 23. services scoop 252013 EDITION SERVICES MATTER Steel Pan A patent application was filed by, and granted, in 2001 to Hydro Steel LLC for using the hydroform press to mass produce steelpans in the United States. The patent on the process of making the steelpan was later challenged by the Government of Trinidad and Tobago and revoked by the United States Patent Trademarks Office (USPTO), a success for Trinidad and Tobago. The process was previously developed by a research team at the University of the West Indies where, accordingly, the researchers claimed that an application for a patent was not submitted due to a lack of finances and concern that the patent process was too complex.5 Trinidadian steelpan producers can therefore continue with innovations of the steelpan and quite possibly, someday, be granted patents on these improvements. BLACK BELLY SHEEP While the commercial use of the Black Belly sheep's name has not been subject to legal proceedings, protecting and promoting the name in trade would be an ideal Government strategy for Barbadian businesses. Some groups have already laid claim to the Black Belly Sheep, therefore, challenges to any form of registration/ protection should not be surprising. Needless to say, IP protection of the Black Belly sheep would undoubtedly position entrepreneurs in the manufacturing and even service sectors to differentiate their offerings in the global market. 5 “Intellectual property issues strike at the heart of the steelpan”. July 31, 2011. Dr. Kris Rampersad, The Guardian (Trinidad and Tobago). Accessed October 11, 2012. <http://www.guardian. co.tt/entertainment/2011/07/31/ intellectual-property-issues-strike-heart- steelpan> for Guysuco, as neither of the above cases dealt directly with “Demerara” as a protected word/brand. Therefore, attempts can be made for “Demerara” to be protected as a GI, collective mark, or even a trademark by altering the name; “Demerara of Guyana”, “Guyanese Demerara”, “Demerara Sugar” or “Guyana’s Demerara Sugar” are some examples. Furthermore, Camembert de Normandie was said to be a generic term according to a French court in 1926, but is now protected in France and the EU.4 1 Anderson v. Britcher 30 T. L. R. 78 (1913), 34 Cox’s Criminal Law Cases 60 2 Bedesse Imports Ltd v. Guyana Sugar Corporation Inc., 2010 ONSC 3388 3 Bedessee Imports Ltd. v. Guyana Sugar Corporation, Inc., 2010 ONSC 3388. para. 17. 4 Gangjee, Dev Saif, Demerara Sugar: A Bitter Pill to Swallow? (December 1, 2011). Intellectual Property Journal, Vol. 24, p. 1, 2011. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/ abstract=2029290
  24. 24. 26 services scoop 2013 EDITION SERVICES MATTER Annual Services Week5 th By Michelle Hustler, GIZ The Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Service Industries hosted its fifth annual services week from October 29 to November 2, 2012. Having now attended three of these five events, it’s quite clear that the activity is bigger, better attended and more impressive with each consecutive year. Professor Miguel Carillo, Executive Director of Arthur Lok Jack Graduate School of Business, joked during the opening ceremonies, at the Excellence in Service Awards, that he looks forward to the day when the event more closely resembles the Grammys. Knowing the TTCSI, as I do, it may not be that many more years before I’m ushered down the red carpet to my seat in a blaze of flashing photographs. For those of you who missed it, I’ll do my best to summarize this important, dynamic, week-long trade in services event, covering four sub-sectors, an industry awards show and an exciting closing event in the four pages allotted to this article in the Scoop, however, it really would be a much easier feat to simply have all the readers attend next year’s event, than it would to compose a thorough four page summary of Services Week. Excellence in Service Awards As I greeted the TTCSI staff at the door to the ballroom, my first impression was that the event certainly had the vibe of an awards ceremony. In true Caribbean fashion, attendees and prospective awardees were dressed to the nines. Drinks were being served by attentive staff. The crowd buzzed. Promptly at 6:30pm, as scheduled, the event was underway. This year, like the last, there were seven awards categories, including a ‘Special Award’, awarded last year to Anya Ayoung-Chee, season 9 winner of Project Runway. This year the ‘Special Award’ went to Roger Al the creator of I'm Santana: the Movie, the highest grossing feature film produced in Trinidad and aYouTube viral hit. If you haven’t yet caught this Trini puppet drama… well, go on, I’ll wait Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Service Industries
  25. 25. services scoop 272013 EDITION SERVICES MATTER for you here… Hilarious, ent?! Other awardees include Mamatoto Resource and Birth Centre and the Association of Female Executives of Trinidad and Tobago (see page 29 for the full list of winners). A common message of the awardees and attendees was how pleased they were to see kudos being offered in this critical, but commonly overlooked sector. Unleashing ICT for Development Day 2’s workshop, Unleashing ICT for Development was the best attended event of the week with over 250 participants. It’s a little wonder why. The keynote speaker was Mr. Annesh Chopra, the former American Federal Chief Technology Officer of the United States, who answered directly to President Barak Obama. Not only is Mr. Chopra highly knowledgeable, but charismatic, engaging and (can I say?) cool as well. Comedian John Stewart, of the Daily Show, described him quite accurately during a 2009 episode as ‘The Indian George Clooney’. The packed house was rapt. Chopra, through numerous examples, highlighted the power of ICT for development. He discussed three trends: Digital Infrastructure, Open Government and Innovation Platforms and how the amalgamation of these three elements can result in unlimited growth potential. His presentation is available on the CNSC site, but I’ll offer one example. In the immediate aftermath of the Haiti earthquake, the US State Department worked with a group of engineers from the tech community to launch a free SMS relief information service to help people in Haiti. The text message program allowed people in Haiti with cell phones to text their location and their needs to a free short code: "4636" (INFO). Using an open-source platform the texts were accessible globally linking the ‘listeners’ – those translating the texts from French Creole into English – to the helpers – those who were able to respond to the needs. They fielded 50,000 messages, each one taking approximately 10 minutes from the time sent to dispatch. A great example of how the infrastructure, plus the innovative platform, in addition to harnessing widely dispersed talent can make a tremendous difference. Cosmetology Workshop: The Importance of Standards and Raising Your Game I sat at a front table before the workshop began, writing the bit on the Aneesh Chopra presentation, hardly lifting my eyes from the laptop. I paid no attention to the bustle of participants settling at tables around me, waiting for TTCSI’s Executive Director, Mr. Nirard Tewarie to take the mic and begin the day’s proceedings. It was only finally during these opening remarks that I took the occasion to survey the room. Oh. My.
  26. 26. 28 services scoop 2013 EDITION SERVICES MATTER Two simultaneous thoughts struck me at once: 1. How was the TTCSI able to fill and entire ballroom (there must have been 200+ people in the room) with a sector generally concerned with the creative elements of the profession and the day-to-day demands of making women beautiful? As a former manager of a service coalition myself, I had not known the sector to come together in such large numbers to discuss the more technical aspects of cosmetology, such as setting standards, drafting legislation and building a vibrant association – topics being discussed that morning. I was equally impressed with the TTCSI’s ability to interest so many cosmetologists in the event, as I was with the commitment of these cosmetologists to this sector. 2. I should have worn lipstick. Yup. The room was not only full, but full of fashionably dressed, beautifully made up women. Hair, nails, makeup – looking around the room, it seemed clear to me, that this sector knew its ply well. The keynote speaker was Mr. Guy Hewitt, Regional Manager of City & Guilds Caribbean. City & Guilds is a world leading vocational education organization. The company develops internationally recognized standards, offers training and certification. Mr. Hewitt discussed the importance of standards both generally and specifically to this sector. By the response in the room, it seemed clear that all were in favor of coming together, establishing standards and working through the recently strengthened Trinidad and Tobago Cosmetology Association in building a vibrant sector. Trinidad has this way of making everything exciting – even a workshop on standards. A point was made at the ICT event on Tuesday about “emphasizing verbs over nouns”. Trinidad has certainly transformed the noun ‘Carnival’ into a verb. The workshop was punctuated by up-beat, exciting hair, makeup and nail ‘fashion shows’ – including, in fact Carnival models! TTCSI & AC12 FORUM: 'The Brain Gain' Another element of Services Week I very much appreciated was how the TTCSI was able to repeatedly highlight and celebrate the success of Trinidadians. Not only via the evident celebrations associated with the Excellence in Service Awards, but consistently throughout the week. Perhaps the best example of the celebration of excellence took place during the Brain Gain workshop. This workshop took the form of a panel discussion involving six young, dynamic Trinidadians involved in various aspects of film making and gaming at the highest international level. Digital artists, visual effects compositors, animators, character artists, software engineers, hailing from companies like Lucas Film, Disney, Pixar and Rockstar Games. They had worked on dozens of movies like Preist, Narnia, FrankenWeenie, Beowulf, Transformers and Dark Shadow. All told a similar story of dreaming big, following your passion, taking chances, being innovative and working hard. I hope TTCSI takes the opportunity to share the success stories that emerged during Services Week with the rest of the region. These success stories are necessary. Perhaps in consuming enough of them, Trinidad and the Caribbean might one day overcome the biggest barrier to trade… self-belief. Entertainment as a Business The final formal workshop of the week featured Mr. Ray Paul, described in the programme as ‘Music Business Legend’. What Paul offered the audience, was very specific and very informed advice on penetrating the EU music industry. The presentation is available online. All musicians and music managers in the Caribbean should review and consider the advice being offered. SW12 Closing Party The event closed with a joint Animae Caribe- TTCSI closing party. There are a lot of areas Trinidad clearly leads the region in and throwing a great celebration is definitely one of those areas. Music, food and drinks and a fete celebrating services and services excellence (again, clear in the quality of the offerings of the event) took participants late into the night. I’m going to close with two piece of advice, advice that is not news to me, but was reinforced during the week’s events: 1. Caribbean service providers, believe in yourself! With the multitude of examples demonstrating excellence at regional and international levels, there is no reason to continue to believe that your service cannot also be on par with international champions. Just focus and go for it! 2. Don’t miss another Services Week. Having attended every Services Week activity over the past two years, whether it was a session in fashion, cosmetology, ICT, filmmaking, animation or entertainment, I took home a valuable lesson that I can apply to my own services company - so will you. See you next year.
  27. 27. services scoop 292013 EDITION SERVICES MATTER
  28. 28. 30 services scoop 2013 EDITION SERVICES MATTER Summit Global Services the “Really Good Friends of Services” (RGF) group. Comprised of 20 WTO members, they have been meeting since January 2012 and laying the framework for the potential launch of negotiations on an International Services Agreement (ISA). As he has done at previous Summits, Ambassador Ron Kirk, the United States Trade Representative made the opening Keynote to the Summit. Afterwards, he joined a panel of Ministerial level colleagues from RGF and TPP member countries, that included Honorable Ed Fast, Minister for Trade and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway of Canada; Honorable Anabel Gonzalez, Minister of Foreign Trade of Costa Rica; Honorable Taeho Bark, Minister for Trade of the Republic of Korea; and Honorable Tim Groser, Minister of Trade of New Zealand for a robust discussion on the paths ahead for services negotiations. Ambassador Kirk commented in his opening address, "the ISA presents significant new opportunities to examine the achievements of services agreements so far; consolidate the most important and effective elements into a single framework; and extend that framework to a broader group of countries. The ISA also offers a means of building international consensus on new trade rules that someday could be introduced into the WTO." Other ministers agreed with the sentiments of Ambassador Kirk. Minister Anabel Gonzalez of Costa Rica hailed the importance of services trade liberalization, mentioning the strong service chapters in Costa Rica's over 50 Free Trade Agreements (FTA). Moreover, that Costa Rica's IT services exports have multiplied 9 fold in a decade, surpassing tourism and that opening their telecommunications and insurance sectors have dramatically increased Costa Rica's participation in the global value chains. More broadly, Minister Bark commented on the role of services in global economic recovery, noting that we have international debt problems, a global imbalance and a slow but noticeable increase in protectionism and the most effective way to combat this is to make progress in liberalization. Bark said, "keep the ball rolling with the ISA, TPP and other liberalizations." The Summit also convened a panel of several senior trade officials from the RGF group, where the panel discussed their aspirations for such an agreement. As noted by one of the panelists, the consensus that emerged among the panelists through the presentation was encouraging. Some example characteristics of the ISA that panelists agreed on are that it should be ambitious, have additional market access provisions, allow for other countries to join after it is completed, and be completed within a year. Further panels continued the discussion of past summits on the importance of the Asia Pacific economies and the 21st century issues that services trade faces, such as state-owned enterprises (SOEs), services' important role The Summit brought together over 350 international trade policy leaders from business, government, academia and media from all over the world. The focus for the 2012 Summit was "Services: The New Agenda", highlighting the growing recognition of the importance of trade liberalization in services and investment, as the world services sector comprises 70% of the world’s GDP and roughly a similar percentage of employment. 2012 has been the year in which we have seen a growing number of substantive services commitments being negotiated such as in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a trade agreement involving the US, Brunei, Chile, New Zealand, Singapore, Australia, Peru, Vietnam, Canada, Malaysia and Mexico, as well as the positive momentum in Geneva among By James Lim US Coalition of Service Industries On September 19, 2012 at the Grand Hyatt, Washington, D.C., the Coalition of Service Industries of the US (USCSI) and its Global Services Coalition (GSC) partners convened the 4th annual Global Services Summit (GSS).
  29. 29. services scoop 312013 EDITION SERVICES MATTER in enabling the movement of goods in the global value chain, forced localization and restrictions on cross-border data flows. A special presentation was also made recognizing the achievements of retiring CSI President, Bob Vastine and welcoming the new President, Ambassador Peter Allgeier. For summaries of the panels of the summit and videos, visit: http://uscsi.org/about-csi/ global-services-summit-2012. Following the Summit, the GSC convened their annual business meeting and a special seminar on the role of service coalitions in developing countries. This seminar was hosted at Microsoft Corporation's Washington, D.C. office. Presentations were made by Sebastien Saez, Senior Trade Economist from the World Bank; Andrea Lupo, US Trade and Development Agency; David Primack, International Lawyers and Economists Against Poverty; Rajesh Sharma, Director General of the Services Export Promotion Council of India; Nirad Tewarie, CEO of the Carribean Network of Service Coalitions; and Angela Becaty, East African Business Council representative. Asha Bobb-Semple, Jamaican Coalition of Service Industries andYvonee Agard, Saint Lucia Coalition of Service Industries participated in the seminar. They spoke on the challenges of creating service coalitions and the opportunities they create to help economic growth in developing countries. The GSC is comprised of the Australian Services Roundtable, Canadian Services Coalition, Coalition of Services Industries Malaysia, Coalition of Service Industries of the US, the European Services Forum (ESF), Hong Kong Coalition of Services Industries (HKCSI), Japan Services Network, Mexican Services Coalition, The National Association of Software and Services Companies (India), Taiwan Coalition of Service Industries, and TheCityUK (United Kingdom). They spoke on the challenges of creating service coalitions and the opportunities they create to help economic growth in developing countries.
  30. 30. 32 services scoop 2013 EDITION SERVICES Coalitions A service coalition is an organization of stakeholders related to the services sector who may have diverse interests, but nevertheless share a common objective: the development of the service industry. A service coalition ultimately aims to enhance the international competitiveness of the services sector. It does this by raising the profile of the services sector, supporting the development of an enabling environment, building private sector capacity and engaging in export promotion activities, amongst many other efforts. Service Coalitions In the Caribbean, there are actively functioning coalitions in Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Jamaica, Saint Lucia and Trinidad and Tobago. Get involved in the activities of your coalition today! Contact details are on page 73. If there is no coalition, help support the creation of this valuable organization. Start by speaking to service exporting champions and the Ministry responsible for trade. In this section, we explore what is happening with the coalition movement in the Caribbean and around the world.
  31. 31. services scoop 332013 EDITION SERVICES Coalitions What is a service coalition and how do they differ in developing countries? A service coalition is an organization of stakeholders related to the services sector who may have diverse interests, but nevertheless share a common objective: the development of the service industry. The aims of the stakeholders are seen to be more efficiently accomplished through a coalition. The coalition movement was first launched through the UK Liberalisation of Trade in Services (LOTIS) Committee in late 1981, followed soon thereafter by the US Coalition of Service Industries (USCSI). Since then, new coalitions have been established in countries throughout the world, with the Global Services Coalition (GSC) now boasting more than 13 members worldwide. LikeLOTISandUSCSI,mostdevelopedcountryservicecoalitions focusonlobbyingandraisingtheprofileoftheservicessector. Theirefforts traditionallyrevolvearoundthepromotionofservicesliberalization. Service coalitions that are currently evolving in developing countries – such as sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and the Caribbean – offer an innovative channel for micro and small services firms to unlock the potential of the services sector and foster inclusive growth, sustainable development and poverty reduction. Service Coalitions: An Overview of Experiences in the Caribbean and Africa By Michelle Hustler, GIZ & David Primack, ILEAP
  32. 32. 34 services scoop 2013 EDITION SERVICES Coalitions However, a slightly different model has emerged in developing countries (starting with Malaysia circa 2001) which focus on developing the services sector in order to be able to better take advantage of available market access opportunities. In this respect, service coalitions in developing countries have the potential to offer a range of more robust interventions. In doing so, they can serve to augment and complement public sector institutional roles, thereby helping to provide essential support services for catalysing dynamic entrepreneurial activity. What are the challenges facing domestic services firms in developing countries? Despite the vast potential of the services sector, the challenges faced by developing- country firms to harness them are numerous and exacerbated by the endemic scarcity of available and/or quality services data. Some of the characteristics and challenges facing domestic these services firms include: • Fragmentation – firms are often fragmented and small with little or no representation across sectors; • Lack of understanding – the service sector is not well understood, including by policymakers, politicians and the public- at-large; • Little influence – many services firms, especially micro and small firms, often have little political influence; • Weak policy/regulatory environment – emanating in part from the lack of understanding, the policy and regulatory environments are often quite weak, especially when it comes to providing targeted incentives to help develop the sector domestically; • Low access to affordable finance – the limited capital base of these firms and their inability to access affordable finance is perhaps the single-most important constraint on firm/sector growth (resulting from the intangibility of services and exorbitant interest rates); • Low recognition – these firms also tend to suffer from low brand recognition and credibility; • Poor market information – these firms often suffer from an inability to readily access critical information on overseas markets. How can service coalitions help? Service coalitions can take a more proactive role in helping to address many of the challenges above. This can be done by engaging in the following activities: • Offering a unified voice on services issues and helping to raise awareness. By serving as a focal point on services, coalitions can help to better articulate and disseminate private sector needs and commercial interests, as well as raise awareness amongst a cross-section of stakeholders (public and private, including the donor community); • Providing training to small and micro enterprises, including sector-specific associations; • Advocating for policy and regulatory reforms, trade negotiations, standards and incentives; • Assisting service providers to promote and increase trade and exports, including through the dissemination of information on export opportunities and market intelligence, supporting trade missions and fairs; • Collecting data and offering award/ recognition programs. Taking on such roles, coalitions can also serve as an important conduit for targeting development cooperation (or aid-for-trade) resources towards the services sector. Experiences in the Caribbean The initial implementation of service coalitions in the Caribbean proved more difficult than expected. While floated as a In this respect, service coalitions in developing countries have the potential to offer a range of more robust interventions.
  33. 33. services scoop 352013 EDITION SERVICES Coalitions concept for more than a decade prior, by early 2010 only four coalitions could have been considered operational. One key obstacle was the lack of awareness pertaining to private sector needs vis-à-vis services policy, negotiations and even trade promotion, and thus the associated challenge of articulating their own needs as well as generating public sector buy-in. Another challenge emerged due to assumptions about the relationships coalitions would have with their national Chambers of Commerce (which was not always feasible). Lastly, the lack of adequate and consistent funding for the coalitions resulted in delays and a number of false starts. Since late 2010/early 2011 however, significant progress has been achieved in the region. This includes the December 2010 inauguration of the Caribbean Network of Service Coalitions alongside the strengthening of existing coalitions in Barbados, Saint Lucia, and Jamaica via additional financial and human resources, as well as the operationalization of coalitions in Antigua and Barbuda, Belize, Dominica, Grenada. Helping to underpin this momentum has been varying combinations of support from national governments, alongside the Caribbean Export Development Agency, GIZ (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit GmbH) and DFID’s CARTFund (Caribbean Aid for Trade and Regional Integration Trust Fund). Experiences in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) Experiences establishing service coalitions in SSA remain at a preliminary stage (despite also having been floated over a decade ago). East and Southern Africa is perhaps most advanced on this front, with Uganda serving as the most commonly known coalition in the region. With laudable achievements to-date, the Uganda-CSI continues to face challenges in shifting from ad-hoc activities and influence to a more systemic role as a fully functioning coalition. As in the initial Caribbean phase, progress has been hampered by the availability of financial resources, alongside the political challenges of situating itself in the existing landscape. At a regional level, the East African Business Council (EABC) has taken the lead, collaboratively with the International Lawyers and Economists Against Poverty (ILEAP), to establish the East Africa CSI (EACSI). Building on efforts in 2009 and 2010, stakeholders outlined a road map for bringing the coalition to fruition. While the full scope of this effort has not yet garnered the financial support needed to move into implementation, results have been achieved in the context of securing support to develop a Professional Services Platform to be housed at EABC.1 As noted by stakeholders early in the process, the Platform constitutes an essential stepping stone to the formation of the EACSI. Similar efforts are underway throughout the continent – including (to name a few): Burundi, Congo-Brazzaville, Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana, and South Africa. At a regional level, the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) Business Council is also advancing on its mandate to support the formation of coalitions throughout COMESA. Seen in this light, service coalitions in SSA are emerging with the potential to serve as an essential business support organisation, helping to mitigate institutional deficiencies across a range of interventions that might otherwise be provided by the public sector in developed countries. They also have the potential to serve as innovative channels for delivering aid-for-trade resources. Doing so requires that stakeholders in SSA take heed of the success factors in the Caribbean, as well as development partners’ recognising the different nature of coalitions and associated support needs to facilitate their success. This article is based on the ILEAP’s publication: Harnessing Services Trade for Development: A Background and Guide on Service Coalitions in Africa and the Caribbean; available at www. ileap-jeicip.org. An earlier version of this article was previously published in BRIDGES Africa, Vol 1 Issue 4. 1 Via TradeMark East Africa
  34. 34. 36 services scoop 2013 EDITION SERVICE SECTOR HIGHLIGHTS Antigua and Barbuda The ABCSI was launched in February, 2011. With a single staff member elaborating the efforts of the organization, progress may be slow, but it’s steady. The most recent successes of the ABCSI include efforts in the establishment of an ICT association, capacity building sessions for those in the film and video sector, as well as support to the fashion sector via the co-hosting of Kreyol Fashion Days. The organization will continue to drive the country’s priority sectors forward. The ABCSI maintains an active Facebook Group for ongoing discussions on the national services sector. Join the conversation! Barbados Having worked assiduously on the organizational strategy in 2012 (read all about it on page 38), the BCSI is now leading the process of developing a national service sector development strategy and export promotion plan, which will include an asset mapping database for service providers. The first national steering committee meeting in this respect has taken place and efforts will continue throughout 2013. Some other 2012 BCSI activities included a grant proposal writing workshop, the creation of a professional development opportunity (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)) for those in the construction sector, export and funding workshops for those in the creative industry and EPA awareness building workshops. Belize The Belize Coalition of Service Providers is the eighth actively functioning coalition, having set up earlier this year. During a short, busy period the BCSP has hired an executive director and support staff, secured an office space, set up and are raring to go. Firstactivitiesplannedinvolvethe developmentofaservicesectordatabase, undertakingabaselinesurvey,andthehostingof aServicesWeekearlyin2013whichwillinclude awarenessraisingsessions,capacitybuilding workshops,aswellasthesecondAGM. BCSP is currently undertaking a membership drive, while assessing the needs and the challenges of the various national services sectors. Dominica During this first full year of operations the DCSI has secured a new office space, expanded its membership, conducted a baseline assessment of the country’s priority sectors, held sensitization workshops, guided the development of work plan for the construction sector, supported the health and wellness sector in the establishment of an association, facilitated an intellectual property workshop for the music and film sector, established an online services directory and provided guidance to several new and fledgling associations. The DCSI has also launched its website – www.dominicacoalition.org, as well as a Facebook page. Next year, the DCSI hopes to complete a comprehensive service sector strategy and action plan for Dominica. Dominican Republic The ‘Coalicion de Servicios de Republica Dominicana’ was very recently launched on December 5, 2012. The CSRD includes key associations in ICT, film and audiovisual, accountants, management consultants, fashion, movie producers and tourism. It will expand to include most services industries associations in the DR. The key initial sectors are expected to continue the coordination of activities at the regional level with the key regional entities as well as through the CSIs. The CSRD is being supported by the Santo Domingo Chamber of Commerce through the support of a Secretariat and the Ministry of Industry and Commerce through the Directorate of ExternalTrade (DICOEX). Coalition Updates
  35. 35. services scoop 372013 EDITION SERVICE SECTOR HIGHLIGHTS It is anticipated that the CSRD will be actively involved in the efforts of the network over 2013. Grenada The Grenada Coalition of Service Industries is one of the newest fully active coalitions, having launched earlier in the year. Since the launch Grenada has been meeting with the various service sector associations to assess their needs, raise awareness regarding the role of a coalition and garner support for the coalition’s efforts. They are working closely with professionals in the health and wellness, ICT, creative industries, architects and engineering sectors to establish professional associations for these key groups. The GCSI has been working on the development of a five year strategic plan which is expected to be implemented beginning next year. GCSI’s other upcoming efforts involve enhanced communication through the development of a website. Guyana The Guyana Coalition of Service Providers has recently hired a Research Officer/ Assistant Coordinator who has been instrumental in the rapid movement of the Coalition over the past three months. As a starting point, the GCSP is undertaking a detailed compilation of the all services providers and umbrella associations in Guyana as well as assessing the needs and challenges of the key services sectors. The GCSP will be strengthening their communication over the upcoming months through various strategies including the development of a website and annual services publication. By next year the GCSP anticipates servings as a fully active coalition. Jamaica In the JCSI’s first year of operation, the organization developed the Services Sector Strategy and Expansion Plan which will focus on the development of six priority sectors. The plan will be finalized by the end of the year and will be implemented beginning 2013. Promotion and awareness building was a heavy focus of the year. The JCSI launched its website -www.jamaciacsi.org and the JCSI quarterly newsletter, The Services Atlas which is available electronically. To facilitate the dissemination of important information a database of stakeholders, including national associations, was created. With the purpose of raising awareness on services issues, the JCSI also participated in numerous national level and association-driven events and participated in policy dialogue. The coalition also supported the formation of the Business Process Industry Association of Jamaica and are working with the relevant stakeholders to establish a spa association. Saint Lucia 2012wasasignificantandstrategicyearforthe SLCSI. Asurveyofserviceprovidersandservices firmsinkeysectorswasundertaken. Theoutput wasusedtoinformbothapolicypaperoutlining recommendationsonaNationalServicesPolicy forSaintLuciawhichfocusesonpolicy,regulatory andtradeinvestmentissues,aswellasroadmap designedtoenhanceexportcompetitiveness. Othereffortsincludedsupporttothespaand wellnesssectorregardingthedevelopmentand implementationofacodeofpracticeforhealth andbeautyfacilities,technicalsupporttothree associationsintheexecutionoftheirworkplans,as wellasresourcemobilizationforthesesectors. TheSLCSIhasbeenworkingveryclosely withtheTradeExportPromotionAgency(TEPA) toassisttheUnitintargeting keyservicessectors fortradeexportpromotion,theMinistryof Commerce,BusinessDevelopmentandInvestment inthedevelopmentofSaintLucia’sservices sectorandInvestSt.Luciaforthepromotionof investmentsintotheservicessector. TheSLCSIalsohelditsannualgeneral meeting,wherekeyassociationexecutives representingprofessionalservicesassociations wereelectedtotheboardofdirectorstoserveforthe period2012-2014. SaintLuciaisalsospearheadinganinitiative toestablishanOECSCoalitionNetworkinorder toharnessandmaximizeonthelimitedcapacities withintheOECSCSIsandcontinuestonetwork withitscolleagueintheregiontocreateastrong “Services”alliance. Trinidad and Tobago TTCSI has been busy as ever! Two key events are featured in this edition of Services Scoop. Check out the articles on Services Week on pages 26-27 and the Align Private Showcase which took place London on pages 48-49. Other noteworthy activities undertaken during 2012 include study tour to Europe for the creative industries, the initiation a national ICT strategic plan for off-shoring, the elaboration of a project which seeks to enhance competitiveness in key priority sectors, several awareness building workshops including an awareness building session on exporting to the EU and support to various associations including the Printing and Packaging Association. The Bahamas, Suriname and Haiti The Bahamas, Suriname and Haiti have each expressed an interest in establishing a coalition of service industries and the wheels are slowly in motion to achieve this end. The GIZ remains on stand-by to provide the support necessary, including one-on-one capacity building support, to ensure that the coalitions are established and well-functioning across CARIFORUM.
  36. 36. 38 services scoop 2013 EDITION SERVICES Coalitions FACILITATING THE GROWTH OF THE DOMESTIC SERVICES MARKET By Lisa Cummins, Barbados Coalition of Service Industries The Barbados Coalition of Service Industries (BCSI), the first services coalition to be established in the region, has been in existence for nearly ten years. Though a decade has now passed, the rationale of the CARICOM Heads of Government for establishing coalitions nearly ten years ago – supporting the region’s trade in services agenda - remains as relevant today as it was then. We now have coalitions spanning from Belize, across to Jamaica and down the island chain to Guyana, each with shared regional interests, but unique national imperatives. Around us the economic and global environment has dramatically evolved. Developments organizationally, regionally and internationally have presented a set of diverse challenges which the coalitions have had to assess, mitigate and translate into opportunities in order to deliver on the mandate given by the Heads. The region’s collective agenda, while unchanged at its core, certainly has needed to evolve operationally and strategically to remain relevant. National economies and the services coalitions which serve them, accordingly have to make their own way forward through clearly articulated development strategies including export development interventions which lay the groundwork for export promotion. This, while keeping a keen eye fixed outward on evolving international developments and best practices. Internationally, the region has signed for the first time a reciprocal trade agreement, the Economic Partnership Agreement, which includes services. However, although BCSICharting a New Strategic Direction

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