World War 1 Changes on the Home Front & Abroad
The Espionagae Act of 1917 <ul><li>The Espionage Act of 1917, which was enacted on June 15, was meant to deter people from...
Espionage Act <ul><li>Hundreds of people were arrested under the Espionage Act for stating their beliefs. </li></ul><ul><l...
 
 
 
 
Bibliography <ul><li>American History , s.v. &quot;Espionage Act (1917),&quot; accessed February 8, 2011. http://americanh...
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World war 1 Sara Mendonca

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World war 1 Sara Mendonca

  1. 1. World War 1 Changes on the Home Front & Abroad
  2. 2. The Espionagae Act of 1917 <ul><li>The Espionage Act of 1917, which was enacted on June 15, was meant to deter people from speaking out against the government or spying. </li></ul><ul><li>Under the sedition act people that threatened national security or attempted to share information that they shouldn’t have, relating to national security, and people that shared information that the government believed could help another country with the intent of harming the U.S. could be punished by death or imprisoned for up to 30 years. </li></ul><ul><li>A person that endangered national security through negligence and a person who helps others who violated the Espionage Act could be fined up to $10,000 and arrested for up to 2 years. </li></ul><ul><li>People that spoke out against U.S. involvement in the war or who promoted victory of the enemy could be fined up to $10,000 and imprisoned for up to 20 years. </li></ul><ul><li>American History , s.v. &quot;Political cartoon about Espionage Act,&quot; Image, Library of Congress, accessed February 8, 2011. http://americanhistory.abc-clio.com/. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Espionage Act <ul><li>Hundreds of people were arrested under the Espionage Act for stating their beliefs. </li></ul><ul><li>Criticism of the government was later removed from the Espionage Act because it was considered a violation of the right to freedom of speech. </li></ul><ul><li>The Espionage Act of 1917 affected America socially by restricting people’s freedom of speech. </li></ul><ul><li>This affected people long term because it was still used to punish people as late as the 1950s. </li></ul><ul><li>Both Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, who were accused of aiding the Soviet Union by passing information about U.S nuclear activity to the U.S.S.R., were executed in 1953 because they were found guilty under the Espionage Act. </li></ul><ul><li>The Supreme-Court would not hear the Rosenberg’s case </li></ul><ul><li>http://americanhistory.abc-clio.com/Search/Display/979164?terms=espionage%20act </li></ul>
  4. 8. Bibliography <ul><li>American History , s.v. &quot;Espionage Act (1917),&quot; accessed February 8, 2011. http://americanhistory.abc-clio.com/. </li></ul><ul><li>American History , s.v. &quot;Political cartoon about Espionage Act,&quot; Image, Library of Congress, accessed February 8, 2011. http://americanhistory.abc-clio.com/. </li></ul><ul><li>American History , s.v. &quot;Rosenberg Trial: Examine,&quot; accessed February 8, 2011. http://americanhistory.abc-clio.com/. </li></ul><ul><li>American History , s.v. &quot; Rosenberg v. United States (1953),&quot; accessed February 8, 2011. http://americanhistory.abc-clio.com/. </li></ul><ul><li>American History , s.v. &quot;Ethel and Julius Rosenberg,&quot; Image, Library of Congress, accessed February 8, 2011. http://americanhistory.abc-clio.com/. </li></ul>

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