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Dyslexia Friendly Classrooms

This session looks at dyslexia and adapting resources to make them more dyslexic-friendly. It requires a BBC report on a giant rat discovered in a volcano - this can be found with a quick search on google. For more info & resources: http://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/Dyslexia-Friendly-Schools-CPL-CPD-6144605/

Dyslexia Friendly Classrooms

  1. 1. © Matt Grant, 2012 www.HumansNotRobots.co.uk Dyslexia-Friendly ClassroomsTeaching the ‘Can’t Reads, Won’t Writes’
  2. 2. © Matt Grant, 2012 www.HumansNotRobots.co.ukWhat is Dyslexia?Terminologydys = an inherent difficulty (or difference) with lexia = using written language / words Dyslexic → Dyslexic Tendencies or Dyslexia-Type Difficulties
  3. 3. © Matt Grant, 2012 www.HumansNotRobots.co.ukWhat is Dyslexia?Part of a family of specific learning difficulties. Dyspraxia Speech and Autistic Spectrum Language Disorder MLD / SLD ADD/ADHD Dyslexia Irlen Syndrome Dyscalculia
  4. 4. © Matt Grant, 2012 www.HumansNotRobots.co.ukWhat do we mean by ‘identifiable learning difficulties’?What is Dyslexia? BehaviourClusters of behaviours we see up front in the classroom. Psychology Underlying differences in the brain’s processes that we can speculate on. Biology Genetic-based differences in brain structure.
  5. 5. © Matt Grant, 2012 www.HumansNotRobots.co.uk Biology Brain activity during reading. Genetic-based differences in brain structure. MAJORITY• Post-mortems and brain scans highlight structural differences in people with dyslexia.• Scans show people with dyslexia typically tend to rely on the right side of the brain. R L• Some post-mortem research DYSLEXIC suggests people with dyslexia may have a larger right side of their brain.• This difference derives primarily from genetics – therefore a key test for dyslexia is to look if there is a family history of literacy difficulties.• Brain injury can also be a cause of R L dyslexia, although less common. http://www.sciencephoto.com/images/download_lo_res.html?id=773600261
  6. 6. © Matt Grant, 2012 www.HumansNotRobots.co.uk Psychology The psychological implications of right-sided dominance and Underlying differences in the reliance: brain’s processes. thinking in images thinking in wordsholistic – seeing the whole R L analytical – processing parts picture but not the parts rather than whole abstract thought - concrete thought – an eyeimagination and creativity for detail - facts, figures etc. emotional linking rational linking – making personal / - making sequential / cause intuitive links and effect linksinterpreting and inferring calculating and recording space conscious – time conscious –focusing on size of task / breaking a task down into end product steps, working to a scheduleartistic and musical skills literacy and numeracy skills http://www.roblambert.com/2007/10/08/right-brain-vs-left-brain/
  7. 7. © Matt Grant, 2012 www.HumansNotRobots.co.uk Typically in relation to literacy: Behaviours 1. Clear discrepancies between intelligence and reading / Clusters of behaviours we see writing skills (highlighted through testing). up front in the classroom. 2. Is hesitant and laboured when reading but understands or Typically in general: reads at a reasonable rate but does not comprehend.1. Struggles to remember facts, figures etc. - 3. ‘Randomly’ fails to recognise common words – omits, adds, particularly when not linked to personal repeats words when reading. experiences. 4. Has a poor standard of written work compared with oral2. Finds many aspects of sequencing difficult ability . - dates, mental arithmetic, formulae etc. 5. Has specific handwriting difficulties – often slow and neat or3. Misreads or mishears instructions – fast and untidy. particularly 2 or more part instructions. 6. Has good ideas but cannot turn them into a organised,4. Appears disorganised and forgetful – will punctuated, fluent piece of writing. lose equipment, miss deadlines, has untidy 7. Has poor spelling – often appearing ‘random’ in approach uniform etc. i.e. no sounding out, simple words spelt wrong etc.5. ‘Switches off’ when spoken to for extended period of time. 8. Often uses high-level vocabulary in conversation.6. Often appears tired and lacking in 9. Does not respond readily to literacy programmes / explicit concentration – particularly at end of teaching of literacy. morning / end of day. 10. Often loses their place in reading or loses their ‘thread’7. Confuses left and right – appears clumsy. during writing, will often lose concentration and tire easily during literacy tasks.8. Shows greater strengths in art, music, drama, design tech, food tech etc. 11. Can become hostile / avoidant during literacy tasks.
  8. 8. © Matt Grant, 2012 www.HumansNotRobots.co.ukTask - “Quietly read through the text and then we’ll answer some questions…”A new species of giant rat has been discovered deep in the jungle of Papua New Guinea.The rat, which has no fear of humans, measures 82cm long, placing it among the largest species of rat known anywhere in theworld.The creature, which has not yet been formally described, was discovered by an expedition team filming the BBC programme LostLand of the Volcano. It is one of a number of exotic animals found by the expedition team.Like the other exotic species, the rat is believed to live within the Mount Bosavi crater, and nowhere else. It is not tame but isunafraid of humans because it has lived in total isolation from them."This is one of the worlds largest rats. It is a true rat, the same kind you find in the city sewers," says Dr Kristofer Helgen, amammalogist based at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History who accompanied the BBC expedition team.Initially, the giant rat was first captured on film by an infrared camera trap, which BBC wildlife cameraman Gordon Buchananset up in the forest on the slopes of the volcano. Immediately, they suspected it could be a species never before recorded byscience, but they needed to see a live animal to be sure.Then trackers accompanying the team managed to trap a live specimen. The trapped rat measured 82cm in length from its nose toits tail, and weighed approximately 1.5kg.It had a silver-brown coat of thick long fur, which the scientists who examined it believe may help it survive the wet and coldconditions that can occur within the high volcano crater. The location where the rat was discovered lies at an elevation of over1,000m.Initial investigations suggest the rat belongs to the genus Mallomys, which contains a handful of other out-sized species.It has provisionally been called the Bosavi woolly rat, while its scientific name has yet to be agreed.
  9. 9. © Matt Grant, 2012 www.HumansNotRobots.co.ukWhat if your brain struggles to focus on and process detailed patterns?A new species of giant rat has been discovered deep in the jungle of Papua New Guinea.The rat, which has no fear of humans, measures 82cm long, placing it among the largest species of rat known anywhere in theworld.The creature, which has not yet been formally described, was discovered by an expedition team filming the BBC programme LostLand of the Volcano. It is one of a number of exotic animals found by the expedition team.Like the other exotic species, the rat is believed to live within the Mount Bosavi crater, and nowhere else. It is not tame but isunafraid of humans because it has lived in total isolation from them."This is one of the worlds largest rats. It is a true rat, the same kind you find in the city sewers," says Dr Kristofer Helgen, amammalogist based at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History who accompanied the BBC expedition team.Initially, the giant rat was first captured on film by an infrared camera trap, which BBC wildlife cameraman Gordon Buchananset up in the forest on the slopes of the volcano. Immediately, they suspected it could be a species never before recorded byscience, but they needed to see a live animal to be sure.Then trackers accompanying the team managed to trap a live specimen. The trapped rat measured 82cm in length from its nose toits tail, and weighed approximately 1.5kg.It had a silver-brown coat of thick long fur, which the scientists who examined it believe may help it survive the wet and coldconditions that can occur within the high volcano crater. The location where the rat was discovered lies at an elevation of over1,000m.Initial investigations suggest the rat belongs to the genus Mallomys, which contains a handful of other out-sized species.It has provisionally been called the Bosavi woolly rat, while its scientific name has yet to be agreed.
  10. 10. © Matt Grant, 2012 www.HumansNotRobots.co.ukWhat if you experience directional confusion? What if you reverse letter symbols and whole words? A new sqecies of giant rat has deen biscovered beeq ui the jungle of Paqua New Gniuea. The rat, which has no fear of hnmans, weasures 28cm long, qlacing it among the largest species of rat known anywhere in the world. The creature, which has not yet beeu formally bescripeb, was biscovered by an exqedition team filming the BBC qrogramme Lost Land of the Volcano. It is one of a mumber of exotic amimals found by the exqebition team. Like the other exotic species, the rat is believed ot live within the Mount 8osavi crater, and mowhere else. It is not tame but is unafraid of humans because it has lived in total isolation frow them. "This is oue of the worlds Iargest rats. It is a true rat, the same kind you find in the city sewers," says Dr Kristofer Helgen, a mammalogist based ta the Swithsonian National Nuseum of Natural History who accompanied the BBC expedition team. InitiaIIy, the giant rat was first caqtured on film by an infrared camera traq, which BBC wildlife cameraman Gorbon Buchauan set up in the forest on the sloqes of the volcano. Immebiately, they suspected it could ed a sqecies never before recorbed by science, tub they needed to see a live aniwal to be sure. Then trackers accowpanying the team mana8ed to trap a live specimen. The traqqeb tar measured 58cm in length from its nose to its tail, and weighed aqqroximately 1.2kg. It had a silver-bromn coat of thick long fur, which the scientists who examined it believe may help it survive the wet and cold couditions that can occur withiu the high volcano crater. The location where the rat saw discovered lies at au eleuation of over 1,000m. InitiaI investigations suggest the rat belongs to the geuns Mallomys, which coutains a handful of other ont-sized sqecies. It has provisionally been called the Bosavi woolly rat, while its scieutific n6me has yet to be agreed.
  11. 11. © Matt Grant, 2012 www.HumansNotRobots.co.ukWhat if you rely on sight vocabulary - tending to miscue and skip uncommon words to keep up?
  12. 12. © Matt Grant, 2012 www.HumansNotRobots.co.ukWhat if you find reading laboured and tiring?A new species of giant rat has been discovered deep in the jungle of Papua New Guinea.The rat, which has no fear of humans, measures 82cm long, placing it among the largest species of rat known anywhere in theworld.The creature, which has not yet been formally described, was discovered by an expedition team filming the BBC programme LostLand of the Volcano. It is one of a number of exotic animals found by the expedition team.Like the other exotic species, the rat is believed to live within the Mount Bosavi crater, and nowhere else. It is not tame but isunafraid of humans because it has lived in total isolation from them."This is one of the worlds largest rats. It is a true rat, the same kind you find in the city sewers," says Dr Kristofer Helgen, amammalogist based at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History who accompanied the BBC expedition team.Initially, the giant rat was first captured on film by an infrared camera trap, which BBC wildlife cameraman Gordon Buchananset up in the forest on the slopes of the volcano. Immediately, they suspected it could be a species never before recorded byscience, but they needed to see a live animal to be sure.Then trackers accompanying the team managed to trap a live specimen. The trapped rat measured 82cm in length from its nose toits tail, and weighed approximately 1.5kg.It had a silver-brown coat of thick long fur, which the scientists who examined it believe may help it survive the wet and coldconditions that can occur within the high volcano crater. The location where the rat was discovered lies at an elevation of over1,000m.Initial investigations suggest the rat belongs to the genus Mallomys, which contains a handful of other out-sized species.It has provisionally been called the Bosavi woolly rat, while its scientific name has yet to be agreed.
  13. 13. © Matt Grant, 2012 www.HumansNotRobots.co.ukWhat if you struggle to remember detailed verbal information?A new species of giant rat has been discovered deep in the jungle of Papua New Guinea.The rat, which has no fear of humans, measures 82cm long, placing it among the largest species of rat known anywhere in theworld.The creature, which has not yet been formally described, was discovered by an expedition team filming the BBC programme LostLand of the Volcano. It is one of a number of exotic animals found by the expedition team.Like the other exotic species, the rat is believed to live within the Mount Bosavi crater, and nowhere else. It is not tame but isunafraid of humans because it has lived in total isolation from them."This is one of the worlds largest rats. It is a true rat, the same kind you find in the city sewers," says Dr Kristofer Helgen, amammalogist based at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History who accompanied the BBC expedition team.Initially, the giant rat was first captured on film by an infrared camera trap, which BBC wildlife cameraman Gordon Buchananset up in the forest on the slopes of the volcano. Immediately, they suspected it could be a species never before recorded byscience, but they needed to see a live animal to be sure.Then trackers accompanying the team managed to trap a live specimen. The trapped rat measured 82cm in length from its nose toits tail, and weighed approximately 1.5kg.It had a silver-brown coat of thick long fur, which the scientists who examined it believe may help it survive the wet and coldconditions that can occur within the high volcano crater. The location where the rat was discovered lies at an elevation of over1,000m.Initial investigations suggest the rat belongs to the genus Mallomys, which contains a handful of other out-sized species.It has provisionally been called the Bosavi woolly rat, while its scientific name has yet to be agreed.
  14. 14. © Matt Grant, 2012 www.HumansNotRobots.co.ukUsing full sentences, answer the following.1.What does the new species look like?2. Where was it discovered?3. Who discovered it?4.Why was it not discovered until now?5. Is the new species a danger to humans?6.What name has been given to the new species? What if it takes you extra time to read and understand the questions? What if your handwriting is laboured and slow? What if you struggle to spell common words? What if you struggle to follow a sequence of instructions?
  15. 15. © Matt Grant, 2012 www.HumansNotRobots.co.ukUsing full sentenced, answer the following.1. What does the new specis look like¿2. Where was it discoveried?5. Is the news species a danger to humans!3. How was it discovried it¿4. Why was it not discovered until now¿6. What name has been gived to the news species? The Rules… •Write with your non-writing hand. •Do not use any punctuation. •Do not use any words over three syllables. •Count to five before writing any two-syllable words. •Count to three before writing ‘p’, ‘q’, ‘d’ and ‘b’.
  16. 16. © Matt Grant, 2012 www.HumansNotRobots.co.ukDyslexia-Friendly ClassroomsKey Principles  Students with dyslexic tendencies may not be built for a ‘print culture’ but are nevertheless built for a ‘learning culture’ – their difficulties with learning in our classroom culture are not their fault. Our responses should not be focused on a ‘cure’ but on helping them cope.  Students with dyslexic tendencies learn differently – they typically have strengths and weakness related to their condition. Our responses should focus on playing them to their strengths and helping them succeed.  Students with dyslexic tendencies often have a history of failure and often have great untapped potential – particularly with regards to creativity. An integral part of the ‘dyslexic-friendly package’ is building self-esteem.
  17. 17. © Matt Grant, 2012 www.HumansNotRobots.co.ukhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l_qGJ9svUbM&feature=player_embedded
  18. 18. For further resources or to contact the author, please visit: www.HumansNotRobots.co.ukCopyright , Matt Grant, 2012All rights reserved. Permission to present this material and distribute freely for non-commercial purposes is granted,provided this copyright notice and those in the slides remain intact and is included in the distribution. If you modify thiswork, please note where you have modified it, as I want neither credit nor responsibility for your work.Modification for the purpose of taking credit for my work or otherwise circumventing the spirit of this license is notallowed, and will be considered a copyright violation.Any suggestions and corrections are appreciated and may be incorporated into future versions of this work, andcredited as appropriate.If you believe I have infringed copyright, please contact me via the above website and I will promptly credit , amend orremove the material in question.

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