Discovery of Metals

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  • Discovery of Metals

    1. 1. AOI Human Ingenuity - Date of Discovery of Different Metals
    2. 2. AOI Human Ingenuity - Date of Discovery of Different Metals Hossam Khattab 8B Science November 11th, 2010
    3. 3. Introduction
    4. 4. IntroductionDuring this assignment, I am looking for
    5. 5. IntroductionDuring this assignment, I am looking for The relationship between when a metal was discovered and its reactivity
    6. 6. IntroductionDuring this assignment, I am looking for The relationship between when a metal was discovered and its reactivity How this can relate to our AOI - Human Ingenuity
    7. 7. IntroductionDuring this assignment, I am looking for The relationship between when a metal was discovered and its reactivity How this can relate to our AOI - Human Ingenuity Discuss in detail the scientific aspects
    8. 8. IntroductionDuring this assignment, I am looking for The relationship between when a metal was discovered and its reactivity How this can relate to our AOI - Human Ingenuity Discuss in detail the scientific aspects Discuss the social and non-scientific aspects
    9. 9. Guiding Question
    10. 10. Guiding QuestionDoes a connection or relationship existbetween the reactivity of a metal andwhen it was discovered?
    11. 11. Guiding QuestionDoes a connection or relationship existbetween the reactivity of a metal andwhen it was discovered? What causes this connection, and how can we explain it scientifically?
    12. 12. Relationship Explained
    13. 13. Relationship Explained A relationship does exist between the date a metal was discovered and its reactivity
    14. 14. Relationship Explained A relationship does exist between the date a metal was discovered and its reactivity This relationship:
    15. 15. Relationship Explained A relationship does exist between the date a metal was discovered and its reactivity This relationship: happens because metals that are more reactive are harder to extract from their ores
    16. 16. Relationship Explained A relationship does exist between the date a metal was discovered and its reactivity This relationship: happens because metals that are more reactive are harder to extract from their ores metals that are more reactive are harder to extract from their ores because they are in the form of salts
    17. 17. These are only metals that we have worked with/studied
    18. 18. Metals and Their ReactivityThese are only metals that we have worked with/studied
    19. 19. Metals and Their ReactivityPotassium These are only metals that we have worked with/studied
    20. 20. Metals and Their ReactivityPotassiumSodium These are only metals that we have worked with/studied
    21. 21. Metals and Their ReactivityPotassiumSodiumLithium These are only metals that we have worked with/studied
    22. 22. Metals and Their ReactivityPotassiumSodiumLithiumCalcium These are only metals that we have worked with/studied
    23. 23. Metals and Their ReactivityPotassiumSodiumLithiumCalcium These are only metals that we have worked with/studied
    24. 24. Metals and Their ReactivityPotassiumSodiumLithiumCalciumMagnesium These are only metals that we have worked with/studied
    25. 25. Metals and Their ReactivityPotassiumSodiumLithiumCalciumMagnesiumAluminium These are only metals that we have worked with/studied
    26. 26. Metals and Their ReactivityPotassiumSodiumLithiumCalciumMagnesiumAluminiumZinc These are only metals that we have worked with/studied
    27. 27. Metals and Their ReactivityPotassiumSodiumLithiumCalciumMagnesiumAluminiumZincIron These are only metals that we have worked with/studied
    28. 28. Metals and Their ReactivityPotassiumSodiumLithiumCalciumMagnesiumAluminiumZincIronLead These are only metals that we have worked with/studied
    29. 29. Metals and Their ReactivityPotassiumSodiumLithiumCalciumMagnesiumAluminiumZincIronLead These are only metals that we have worked with/studied
    30. 30. Metals and Their ReactivityPotassiumSodiumLithiumCalciumMagnesiumAluminiumZincIronLeadCopper These are only metals that we have worked with/studied
    31. 31. Metals and Their ReactivityPotassiumSodiumLithiumCalciumMagnesiumAluminiumZincIronLeadCopperSilver These are only metals that we have worked with/studied
    32. 32. Metals and Their ReactivityPotassiumSodiumLithiumCalciumMagnesiumAluminiumZincIronLeadCopperSilverGold These are only metals that we have worked with/studied
    33. 33. Metals and Their ReactivityPotassiumSodiumLithiumCalciumMagnesiumAluminiumZincIronLeadCopperSilverGoldPlatinum These are only metals that we have worked with/studied
    34. 34. Metals and Their ReactivityPotassiumSodiumLithiumCalciumMagnesiumAluminiumZincIronLeadCopperSilverGoldPlatinum These are only metals that we have worked with/studied
    35. 35. Metals and Their ReactivityPotassiumSodiumLithiumCalciumMagnesiumAluminiumZincIronLeadCopperSilverGoldPlatinum These are only metals that we have worked with/studied
    36. 36. Metals and Their ReactivityPotassiumSodiumLithiumCalciumMagnesiumAluminiumZincIronLeadCopperSilverGoldPlatinum These are only metals that we have worked with/studied
    37. 37. Metals and Their Reactivity This group will reactPotassiumSodium with water, and do notLithium need acids to reactCalcium This is the most reactive group of allMagnesiumAluminiumZincIronLeadCopperSilverGoldPlatinum These are only metals that we have worked with/studied
    38. 38. Metals and Their Reactivity This group will reactPotassiumSodium with water, and do notLithium need acids to reactCalcium This is the most reactive group of allMagnesium These metals will react withAluminium mild to slightly strongZinc acids. Lead and Iron will notIron react with mild or diluteLead acids. These are mildly reactive metalsCopperSilverGoldPlatinum These are only metals that we have worked with/studied
    39. 39. Metals and Their Reactivity This group will reactPotassiumSodium with water, and do notLithium need acids to reactCalcium This is the most reactive group of allMagnesium These metals will react withAluminium mild to slightly strongZinc acids. Lead and Iron will notIron react with mild or diluteLead acids. These are mildly reactive metalsCopper These are the least reactive metals. SomeSilver of them may react with very strongGold oxidizing acids, while others will not reactPlatinum at all. This depends on the acid. This is the least reactive of all metals These are only metals that we have worked with/studied
    40. 40. Specific Examples
    41. 41. Specific ExamplesGold is one of the first metals known to man
    42. 42. Specific ExamplesGold is one of the first metals known to manWe also know that gold is one of the leastreactive metal known to man
    43. 43. Specific ExamplesGold is one of the first metals known to manWe also know that gold is one of the leastreactive metal known to manGold was discovered circa 3000 BC
    44. 44. Specific ExamplesGold is one of the first metals known to manWe also know that gold is one of the leastreactive metal known to manGold was discovered circa 3000 BCThis is because gold is so unreactive that itis even sometimes found lying around, not inan ore
    45. 45. Further Examples...
    46. 46. Further Examples...Other examples that prove this rule include (but notlimited to):
    47. 47. Further Examples...Other examples that prove this rule include (but notlimited to): Potassium - One of the most reactive metals - Discovered 1807
    48. 48. Further Examples...Other examples that prove this rule include (but notlimited to): Potassium - One of the most reactive metals - Discovered 1807 Zinc - One of the mildly reacting metals - About 1000 BC
    49. 49. Further Examples...Other examples that prove this rule include (but notlimited to): Potassium - One of the most reactive metals - Discovered 1807 Zinc - One of the mildly reacting metals - About 1000 BC Copper - one of the least reactive metals, and one of the oldest known to man - Evidence Dating as far back as 9000 BC
    50. 50. Explanation
    51. 51. ExplanationMetals that are less reactive are not as hard toextract from their ores.
    52. 52. ExplanationMetals that are less reactive are not as hard toextract from their ores.Very unreactive metals such as gold and silvercan sometimes be found in rivers or in sand,already a pure metal
    53. 53. ExplanationMetals that are less reactive are not as hard toextract from their ores.Very unreactive metals such as gold and silvercan sometimes be found in rivers or in sand,already a pure metalWhile metals that are more reactive are harderto extract
    54. 54. ExplanationMetals that are less reactive are not as hard toextract from their ores.Very unreactive metals such as gold and silvercan sometimes be found in rivers or in sand,already a pure metalWhile metals that are more reactive are harderto extractVery reactive metals such as potassium andsodium need special methods to be extracted
    55. 55. Explanation Continued
    56. 56. Explanation Continued Metals that are more reactive are found in the form of salts in their ore, thus being harder to extract
    57. 57. Explanation Continued Metals that are more reactive are found in the form of salts in their ore, thus being harder to extract Extracting metals from their ores is done using different methods, depending on how reactive the metal is.
    58. 58. Explanation Continued Metals that are more reactive are found in the form of salts in their ore, thus being harder to extract Extracting metals from their ores is done using different methods, depending on how reactive the metal is. Some methods of extraction include using electricity and using heat
    59. 59. Explanation Continued Metals that are more reactive are found in the form of salts in their ore, thus being harder to extract Extracting metals from their ores is done using different methods, depending on how reactive the metal is. Some methods of extraction include using electricity and using heat Sometimes the metal in the ore is not pure and needs to be purified in order for the metal to be useful
    60. 60. Human Ingenuity
    61. 61. Human IngenuityThe two questions posed by Human Ingenuity are“Why and how do we create?” and “What are theconsequences?”
    62. 62. Human IngenuityThe two questions posed by Human Ingenuity are“Why and how do we create?” and “What are theconsequences?”To apply these two questions to the discovery datesof metals we look at
    63. 63. Human IngenuityThe two questions posed by Human Ingenuity are“Why and how do we create?” and “What are theconsequences?”To apply these two questions to the discovery datesof metals we look at 1. The date a metal was discovered
    64. 64. Human IngenuityThe two questions posed by Human Ingenuity are“Why and how do we create?” and “What are theconsequences?”To apply these two questions to the discovery datesof metals we look at 1. The date a metal was discovered 2. The process in which it was discovered and why this took that long to discover it
    65. 65. Human Ingenuity Explained
    66. 66. Human Ingenuity ExplainedIn this case, we can apply and relate human ingenuityin several different ways New technologies and ways needed to be developed to discover and extract more reactive metals These new technologies require a planned, educated process in which trials take place Also, they require new creative ideas and thinking about things in different ways
    67. 67. However...
    68. 68. However...Human Ingenuity AOI asks us to look at theconsequences of new creations as well - New technologies can bring on different forms of pollution New technologies such as these require lots of resources, and will quicken the mining process This in turn can increase the amount of mines, and mountains and forests cleared for mining
    69. 69. Social and Technological Impacts
    70. 70. Social and Technological ImpactsAdvancements such as these also have both positive and negativesocial impacts...
    71. 71. Social and Technological ImpactsAdvancements such as these also have both positive and negativesocial impacts... Positive
    72. 72. Social and Technological ImpactsAdvancements such as these also have both positive and negativesocial impacts... Positive Working with metals over time has given us newer ways, and improved older ones
    73. 73. Social and Technological ImpactsAdvancements such as these also have both positive and negativesocial impacts... Positive Working with metals over time has given us newer ways, and improved older ones Giving us new metals such as alloys (steel, titanium alloy, etc.)
    74. 74. Social and Technological ImpactsAdvancements such as these also have both positive and negativesocial impacts... Positive Working with metals over time has given us newer ways, and improved older ones Giving us new metals such as alloys (steel, titanium alloy, etc.) Give us other alternatives to wood and plastic
    75. 75. Social and Technological ImpactsAdvancements such as these also have both positive and negativesocial impacts... Positive Working with metals over time has given us newer ways, and improved older ones Giving us new metals such as alloys (steel, titanium alloy, etc.) Give us other alternatives to wood and plastic Negative
    76. 76. Social and Technological ImpactsAdvancements such as these also have both positive and negativesocial impacts... Positive Working with metals over time has given us newer ways, and improved older ones Giving us new metals such as alloys (steel, titanium alloy, etc.) Give us other alternatives to wood and plastic Negative Causes continuos “competition” between the different companies, causing them to keep trying to improve their ways, without regard for environmental factors
    77. 77. Social and Technological ImpactsAdvancements such as these also have both positive and negativesocial impacts... Positive Working with metals over time has given us newer ways, and improved older ones Giving us new metals such as alloys (steel, titanium alloy, etc.) Give us other alternatives to wood and plastic Negative Causes continuos “competition” between the different companies, causing them to keep trying to improve their ways, without regard for environmental factors Some argue that an increasing technological dependence affect freedom and physiological health
    78. 78. Bibliography...
    79. 79. Bibliography...Slide 5: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reactivity_seriesSlide 6: http://www.chemicalelements.com/elements/au.htmlSlide 7: http://www.chemicalelements.com/show/dateofdiscovery.htmlSlide 8: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ore, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MiningSlide 9: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrometallurgy, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extractive_metallurgySlide 10: http://www.ibo.org/myp/curriculum/interaction/humaningenuity/Slide 11: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MiningSlide 13: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technology
    80. 80. Bibliography...

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