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Persiflage finals srs and rajeev

Persiflage - the 2016 Books Quiz at the Karnataka Quiz Association. Finals.

Persiflage finals srs and rajeev

  1. 1. Persiflage Finals SURESH RAMASUBRAMANIAN AND RAJEEV CHAKRAVARTHI THANKS FOR REVIEWING: AJAY PARASURAMAN, KESHAV ATHREYA, MOVIN MIRANDA, SAMANTH SUBRAMANIAN, NISHA PILLAI, VINOD VISHWANATH
  2. 2. The Rules u 50 questions, will reverse at 25 u Blanks not indicative of length u Answer multiparts in sequence u Quite a few of them u Unlimited civilized pounces. u When you see this dog, please raise your hands and wait for me to come over. u +10 / -5 pounce, +10 direct.
  3. 3. Q1. Cat Bites Woman, news at 11 Martha Gellhorn, one of over fifty characteristically deformed pet cats that live in a Key West home, spent ten days in quarantine after she bit a tourist in August 2016. (one such cat is on the next slide if it helps) This deformity led to such cats being killed as witches’ familiars in 16th century England, but sailors prized them as rat hunters, as the deformity gave them greater than usual agility aboard a sailing ship. A ship captain gave the owner of that Key West home one such cat as a pet. He began to collect more cats, whose descendants still live at his home. Indeed, Martha Gellhorn is named after his wife. What are such cats known as, named after the homeowner?
  4. 4. Q1. This sort of cat.
  5. 5. A1. Hemingway Cats, which are six toed (also known as polydactyl cats)
  6. 6. Q2. ID the author and the story This 1865 short story was the author’s first commercial success and sparked a rush of visitors to the small Californian mining town of Angel’s Camp in which it was set, all of them demanding to see the fabulously talented creature that was the subject of the story. The town promptly cashed in on the craze and started a competition that lasts to the present day. In 1903, the author found a French translation of the story and was angry enough to have a special edition printed that contained the original story, its French translation and his own translation of the French back into English. He called it “[The Story} - in English, then in French, and then Clawed Back into a Civilized Language Once More by Patient, Unremunerated Toil". ID the author and the story.
  7. 7. A2.
  8. 8. Q3. ID the composer and composition Osamu Tezuka’s Hinotori (Phoenix) is an unfinished manga series of 12 books, each a separate story. Tezuka considered it his "life's work". It was never completed, due to his 1989 death. Tezuka was said to have been influenced to create the series after listening to which classical composition, by whom?
  9. 9. A3.
  10. 10. Q4. The original work, and the fictional work The original treatise was written around 335 BC. It existed in 2 parts, only the first of which survived through to the Middle Ages and early Renaissance as a Latin translation of an Arabic version written by Ibn Rushd (Averroes). The second part is assumed to be lost, though some have speculated that the Tractatus Coislinianus (so named as it was found in the collection of Bishop Henri-Charles du Camboust de Coislin during the 19th century) could be the second part. Both parts are central to the plot of one of the pre-eminent novels of the last 35 years. Name the original treatise, and the novel that references it.
  11. 11. A4. Aristotle’s Poetics The Name of the Rose Book 1 of The Poetics, that covers tragedy in drama, survives. Book 2, which focused on comedy, is lost. The murders in The Name of the Rose were to conceal the existence of Book 2 of the Poetics by Brother Jorge of Burgos.
  12. 12. Q5. Who was named after this apple? Peter Gunnarson ________ imported a variety of greenish yellow apple with dull red stripes from his hometown in native Sweden and it became quite common in the Mid Atlantic US states, Oregon and Northern California through the 19th century. This apple was named after him. Certainly, one translation of the Swedish suffix“bo”is“resident” Author David Morrell was wondering what to name the hero of his 1972 novel, when his wife dropped in with a basketful of these apples that she had bought. He promptly named the hero after this apple.
  13. 13. A5. John Rambo
  14. 14. Q6. What was the“twist”in this 12 chapter 1931 crime thriller? The 1931 crime thriller, The Floating Admiral, features an interesting twist to the conventional murder mystery construct. While the book itself featured a 12-chapter build-up, there was also a prologue (not to be confused with introduction or foreword) by GK Chesterton – no, he was not the author - which was written after the novel itself was complete. What was this twist? [5 for the guessable fact, 10 if you give me something more specific]
  15. 15. A6. Each chapter by a separate author (5) Written by members of the Detection Club u Canon Victor Whitechurch, u G. D. H. Cole and Margaret Cole, u Henry Wade, u Agatha Christie, u John Rhode, u Milward Kennedy, u Dorothy L. Sayers, u Ronald Knox, u Freeman Wills Crofts, u Edgar Jepson, u Clemence Dane and u Anthony Berkeley. Each author contributed their own solution (sealed envelope style) to the mystery. These were published at the end of the book.
  16. 16. Q7. Which book was used to name the Royal Navy ships? Which 1992 novel? Apart from the fact that he is supposed to have invented the sandwich, John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich, was also First Lord of the Admiralty for several years in the second half of the 18th century. During his tenure, the Royal Navy expanded significantly, with a large number of ships being built. As First Lord, Montagu had the right to name them, which he did by simply picking a name from a book on his desk. The Navy thus ended up with several ships named Charon, Orion, Pegasus, Leander and so on. A precursor to the more well-known 19th century compilation of similar themes, the 1788 encyclopedia used by Lord Montagu is a handbook for teachers, dramatists and poets for over 200 years. John Keats is said to have known the book almost by heart. Lawrence Norfolk described the creation of this encyclopaedia in an award-winning baroque novel in 1992. Name the encyclopaedia’s author, or Norfolk’s novel.
  17. 17. A7.
  18. 18. Q8. What minor change did Ali Sardar Jafri make to this folktale? Receiving the 1997 Jnanpith Award, Ali Sardar Jafri narrated a Bengali folktale, in which a rural bangle seller sold his wares to a number of women. After they left, a beautiful woman came up to him. He personally put his best red bangles on her wrists, whereupon she told him that she didn’t have any money, but her father was a priest and would pay for the bangles. At the temple, the priest first denied even having a daughter, till he suddenly realized that the woman was Goddess Durga herself. He lamented that he had spent his life in devotion but the Goddess instead saw fit to appear to the bangle seller, and even let him put bangles on her wrists. The Goddess’ hands briefly appeared, wearing the bangles. That was the end of the original tale. Jafri, using his knowledge of the typical Bengali bangle seller, added what further twist to the tale, exemplifying his syncretic outlook?
  19. 19. A8. The Bangle Seller was a muslim and at the end of the story, he offers namaz.
  20. 20. Q9. The experimental novelist’s surname How did the other author pay him tribute? In the 1960’s, Bryan Stanley________ wrote a series of experimental novels that would now be considered visual writing. These included u His first novel including a section set out as a filmscript u His second novel including cut-through pages to enable the reader to skip forward u A subsequent novel, The Unfortunates (1969), being published in a box with no binding (readers could assemble the book any way they liked, apart from chapters marked 'First' and 'Last' which did indicate preferred terminal points) Sadly, his literary career never really took off and he committed suicide in 1973. Another writer may have used both his name and his experimental legacy to model a peripheral character in his own universe after him. This character, often mentioned but never actually appearing in person, proves an enduring source of structural comic relief. Name this character that the writer created.
  21. 21. A9. Discworld inventor & Architect Bergholt Stuttley (or Bloody Stupid) Johnson
  22. 22. Q10. Who was this polymath? Daniel Defoe notes in his“A Journal of the Plague Year”: “[…] it became common to have signs and inscriptions set up at doors: 'Here lives a fortune-teller', 'Here lives an astrologer', […] and the like; and _____ _____’s brazen-head, which was the usual sign of these people's dwellings, was to be seen almost in every street.” This polymath’s science was centuries in advance of his time. He had supposedly created an automaton brass head that would “speak uncouth aphorisms”. This scientific feat was promptly appropriated by charlatans who flocked to England cashing in on people’s fear of the black death. Who was this polymath?
  23. 23. A10. Roger Bacon
  24. 24. Q11. Who was inspired by this Erasmus Darwin experiment, to create what? Erasmus Darwin (Charles’ grandpa) in his book The Temple of Nature. "Thus the vorticella or wheel animal, which is found in rain water that has stood some days in leaden gutters … Though it discovers no sign of life except when in the water, yet it is capable of continuing alive for many months though kept in a dry state” The author in question misheard this protozoan’s name as vermicelli, and in a discussion with friends, claimed that ”Dr.Darwin had put some vermicelli in a glass cage and experimented upon it”. Which author was this? Name their work that was thus influenced.
  25. 25. A11.
  26. 26. Q12. Who is this orphan? This story of an orphan is so big in Japan that the national broadcaster NHK aired a 156-episode drama serializing the life story of Hanako Muraoka, whose primary contribution to Japanese culture was her translation of this book, which she titled ‘Akage no an’, in secret amidst the bombing of Japan in WWII. There are musicals, TV series, comics and magazines devoted to the activities depicted in the book (quilting, drinking tea, nature walks etc). A 1979 anime of the story is still shown periodically. Visiting the setting of the book (an island) is a rite of passage and 20,000 Japanese make this trip each year. Which book is this?
  27. 27. A12.
  28. 28. Q13. What was the original novel? A E Van Vogt’s “Empire of the Atom” is an SF novel set 10,000 years in the future, about a deformed child in a royal family, who rises to become leader of the family and the empire it controls, through his intelligence and his ability to portray himself as not being a threat to his relatives’ intrigues. Eventually, he is able to repel an alien civilization’s attack by means of his scientific research. Critics noted that this was hardly an original novel from Van Vogt, given his status as one of the pre-eminent SF writers. In particular, they commented that it was an exact replica of a historical novel, with the addition of a science fiction setting. Which novel did they reference?
  29. 29. A13.
  30. 30. Q14. Who was Sidney Sheldon’s friend? Sidney Sheldon’s “A Stranger in the Mirror” is a roman-a-clef around two of his friends. The first was Erin Fleming, a Canadian actress trying to hold down a decent career in Hollywood. The other was an elderly but celebrated comedian, then in the twilight of his career. Fleming pushed this comic genius to make more public performances, which did result in a revival of his popularity in the last 10 years of his life. His family, however, believed that it was responsible for a further decline in his health. Who was this genius?
  31. 31. A14. Groucho Marx Like the book, real life had a sad ending – Fleming committed suicide in 2003, penniless and in-and-out of psychiatric care.
  32. 32. Q15. These are “Zibaldone” or “commonplace books” – renaissance era scrapbooks filled with a random mixture of recipes, mathematical exercises, proverbs, prayers, with whimsical illustrations and doodles, whatever caught the maintainer’s fancy. Now look at this Zibaldone: (..2)
  33. 33. Q15. [continued] The page on the previous slide is from the Zibaldone da Canal – maintained by a prominent Venetian merchant family of that name. It contains three maths problems – Where are they adapted from? Make me this calculation: from Venice to Ancona is 200 miles. A ship is at Ancona and wants to go to Venice, and it goes in 30 days, and at Venice there is another ship that is going to Ancona, and it goes in 40 days. I ask you, if they both leave at the same time, each to go on its voyage, in how many days will the ships come together? The other problems are a similar one about two men travelling from Venice to Rome and Rome to Venice, and about a tree’s rate of growth (both of which are pictured, along with the ships, in the illustrations).
  34. 34. A15.
  35. 35. Q16. The science book that this line from a Keats ballad inspired Here is the first stanza of La Belle Dame sans Merci by John Keats. O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms, Alone and palely loitering? The sedge has withered from the lake, And no birds sing. The last line of the stanza led to a two word title, which was originally a title for one chapter in a book. Thereafter, this chapter title became a title for the whole book, providing a metaphor for a grim future, rather than a literal chapter observing the absence of a natural event. Name the book thus titled, one of the 25 greatest science books of all time.
  36. 36. A16. The last line of the stanza was“And no birds sing”– inspiring Rachel Carson’s ”Silent Spring”
  37. 37. Q17. What is the common name of these? The first relates to a fictional country “featured on the cover of Time”. This issue was specially created for the 1989 film Batman. The issue features pictures supposedly by photo journalist Vicki Vale, played by Kim Basinger, who visited this fictional country off the south east coast of South America to cover the aftermath of a revolution. The country also finds mention in multiple other parts of the DC comics universe.
  38. 38. Q17 – part 2 The second is the protagonist (a sailor and adventurer) of an eponymous comic series created by Italian comic book creator Hugo Pratt in 1967. This comic book hero shares his name with the fictional country that Vicki Vale visited in the Batman movie.
  39. 39. A17. Corto Maltese For example here’s The Dark Knight Returns
  40. 40. Q18. Two authors and their creations, that, according to Ian Fleming, influenced Bond “_________ from the waist up and ________ ________ below” The first blank is the pen name of the author who created a British Boy’s Own Hero character (and an early template for Leslie Charteris’ The Saint). The author’s pen name is the term applied to a soldier who moves in front of an advancing army, digging defensive entrenchments under hostile enemy fire. The second blank refers to an author who defined pulp fiction – both from the violence and sex point of view. For full points, please ID the two authors and their respective creations (2.5 points for each, and 10 in all)
  41. 41. A18. Sapper / Bulldog Drummond Mickey Spillane / Mike Hammer
  42. 42. Q19. Identify the author who is sharing his strategies to cope with stress. “Back from the Brink: Coping with Stress” is a book by an individual who managed very high stress levels in what is known as a “boiler-room” environment. The book is both an autobiography of sorts, as well as a set of detailed conversations with his psychologist Ivan Tyrrell. These assert that the prolonged periods of severe stress that affected his mental and physical health have parallels in many other people's lives. The book details his – u Professional environment and the status and pressures that came with it u Relationship and family problems u Catastrophic failure that affected everyone around him u Struggling with debt and eventual personal bankruptcy u Coping with colon cancer Enough clues in here. Who’s the author?
  43. 43. A19.
  44. 44. Q20. The character and the author that Graham Greene denied being inspired by Graham Greene’s 1982 book Monsignor Quixote is about the adventures of a rural Southern European priest and his unlikely friend, the Communist mayor of his small town. Adversaries at first, they eventually become allies in one of Greene’s lighter works, though it does end on a sad note. The book features a road journey, very much along the lines of Don Quixote, which is what Greene had in mind. Yet, Greene found himself having to explain to people that he had not taken inspiration from another Southern European fictional character with a similar background, featured in over 300 short stories set from 1948 onwards, and almost a national hero in his country of origin. Name this character and the author who created him.
  45. 45. A20. Don Camillo Giovanni Guareschi For those of you who own a Kindle, this is the ONLY book recommendation that this quiz will make. Just buy the three translated volumes that are available on Amazon, and wait as the remaining translations release
  46. 46. Q21. Which seminal 1937 book do these pay homage to? 1. A popular RTS (Real Time Strategy) game
  47. 47. Q21. 2. This track by Swedish industrial metal band Raubtier from their 2009 album“Det Finns Bara Krig”
  48. 48. A21.
  49. 49. 22. Who was Lord Elgin referring to? Flashman thought he wanted a prostitute, rather than a novelist. In George McDonald Fraser’s “Flashman and the Dragon”, Flashman, that famous and unintentionally lucky Victorian era cad and poltroon, is an aide de camp to Lord Elgin, who was in command of the British forces during the Boxer Rebellion. Here is a conversation between the two. [Lord Elgin] strode into the saloon later, threw The Origin of Species on the table and announced: “It’s very original, no doubt, but not for a hot evening. What I need is some ________.” I couldn’t believe my ears, and him a church-goer, too. “Well, my lord, I dunno,” says I. “Tientsin ain’t much of a place, but I’ll see what I can drum up … “Michel’s been reading Doctor Thorne since Taku,” cried he. “He must have finished it by now, surely! Ask him, Flashman, will you?” So I did, and had my ignorance enlightened.
  50. 50. A22. Trollope not Trollop
  51. 51. Q23. Who did Aldous Huxley put the Maharaja of Kashmir in touch with? After reading Aldous Huxley’s final novel “Island”, which features a lot of psychedelic drugs and sex, the erstwhile Maharaja of Kashmir wrote to him asking where the Island of Pala from his book was, where he could obtain such interesting substances. Huxley replied that Pala was non existent, “a kind of pragmatic dream – a fantasy with detailed and practical instructions for making the imagined and desirable harmonization of European and Indian insights become a fact”, but he could and did recommend a supplier. For the drugs, Huxley gave the Maharaja ____ ____’s address.
  52. 52. A23.
  53. 53. Q24. A till very recently unpublished bit of doggerel written by whom in a particular style? Released in 1996 with permission from the poet’s widow Scribblings of the artist as a young man King Bolo's swarthy bodyguard Were called the Jersey lilies A wild and hardy set of blacks Undaunted by syphilis. They wore the national uniform Of a garland of verbenas And a pair of great big hairy balls And a big black knotty penis.
  54. 54. A24.
  55. 55. Q25. Extracts from an Agha Shahid Ali poem, retelling a well known tale from the perspective of another of its characters. The tale – and whose perspective? First, grant me my sense of history: I did it for posterity, for kindergarten teachers and a clear moral: And then grant me my generous sense of plot: […] As if I, a forest-dweller, didn’t know of the cottage under the three oak trees And you may call me the __ __ __, now my only reputation. But I was no child-molester though you’ll agree she was pretty. I ran with that weight and fell down, simply so children could laugh at the noise of the stones […] with a perfect sense of timing, just when the tale should have come to an end.
  56. 56. A25.
  57. 57. Reverse Rounds
  58. 58. Q26. Who is this ”twentieth century savant”? Leon Lederman's The God Particle features an interesting imaginary conversation between Dr.Lederman and the Greek philosopher, Democritus, who first stipulated the existence of an atomos, the fundamental building block of matter. During this conversation, Lederman references numerous aphorisms from a 20th century “savant” famous for his one-liner quotes that maintained the fine balance between aphorism and gaffe. The conversation ends with Democritus enthusiastically proclaiming this fellow“philosopher”to be a genius. Who was this“genius”?
  59. 59. A26.
  60. 60. Q27. Who is the poet? This poem about McDonalds (yes, the burger gents) comes from “Boys Don’t Cry”, a one-off magazine. The full poem is reproduced on the next slide, for the sake of providing the numerous hints present in the general tilt and language. Just name the poet.
  61. 61. Q27. Poem:
  62. 62. A27. Kanye West
  63. 63. Q28. The Naval Officer and his book While in the Royal Navy, he developed a new type of lifeboat, and in 1817, a signaling system for merchant vessels that was still being used into the 1890s. He discovered a gastropod species Cyclostrema cancellatum in 1818, for which he became a Fellow of the Royal Society. He quit in 1830 to become a writer, whose works include “The White Wolf of the Harz Mountains”, probably the first short story with a female werewolf, and “Diary in America”, a travelogue that was so critical of the USA that he was burnt in effigy by irate Americans. He is most famous for a novel about four kids surviving in the wild, helped by a gypsy boy and a kind forester – a prototype for Enid Blyton’s“The Secret Island”.
  64. 64. A28.
  65. 65. Q29. The Writer – and his only work of fiction. 5 each. Extra 5 for explaining how he lost his wife. ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ is a fairy tale about three brothers on a quest, two of whom, being selfish, fail and are turned to stone, while the third, kind hearted brother succeeds. This was a bestseller in early Victorian England and sold out three editions when published as a book in 1851. It was originally written in 1841 by the writer to answer a challenge from his 12-year old female admirer that he couldn’t write a fairy tale. A work of Christian sacrificial morality and charity, its writer was better known for his contributions to art, not least of which was losing his wife to his protégé, another artist, for whom she became his muse and mistress. The writer, and the title of the book – which was reused by Terry Pratchett to nickname a tough, self made recurring character in his books, who made his fortune as a boy from a“tosheroon”– coins held together by muck.
  66. 66. A29. The ”title” of Harry King / Piss Harry, the junkyard owner of Ankh Morpork. Ruskin lost his wife Effie Gray to his protégé Millais – apparently because he was so shocked that she, unlike classical nudes in art, had pubic hair, that he refused to consummate their marriage.
  67. 67. Q30. Who is this writer? What is he talking about, that considerably surprised him? I was given the freedom of the microphone twice a week. “He will not be asked to say anything contrary to his conscience or contrary to his duty as an American citizen.” I thought that covered it… I thought I was fighting for a constitutional point. I mean to say, I may have been completely nuts, but I certainly felt that it wasn’t __________ _______. …I thought I was fighting an internal question of constitutional government. And if any man, any individual man, can say he has had a bad deal from me because of race, creed, or color, let him come out and state it with particulars. The “Guide to Kulchur” was dedicated to Basil Bunting and Louis Zukofsky, a Quaker and a Jew…
  68. 68. A30.
  69. 69. Q31. The Author and The Book (larger image on the next slide) After this sarcastic 1912 reject by a London publisher, which savagely mocked this author’s writing style, the book remained unpublished for over a decade. Several excerpts from the book were serialized by Ernest Hemingway and Ford Madox Ford in the Transatlantic Review, but it found no takers before finally being published in a 1925 limited edition run. Note the repetitive nature and the (over)use of the present participle in the rejection letter.
  70. 70. Q31.
  71. 71. A31.
  72. 72. Q32. Three novels by the same author. His obit in The Times wryly noted that he naturally“wrote comedic novels that sound like Ernst Lubitsch films”.
  73. 73. A32.
  74. 74. Q33. Identify this pioneer of literary journalism, and his book A pioneer of literary journalism, this writer appeared in several strips of the comic Doonesbury, giving an interview to radio host Mark Slackmeyer to promote his 1981 non fiction book, which covered in luscious detail the sexual antics of Americans in the golden age when AIDS was yet unknown, and is named from the Decalogue. These strips, a couple of which are shown on the next slides, depict him wearing a pith helmet. The imagery is deliberate, representing his journey into dangerous journalistic terrain. In recent times, his style has finally caught up with him, with claims of compromising on research in favour of literary embellishment.
  75. 75. Q33. Doonesbury strip #1
  76. 76. Q33. Doonesbury strip #2
  77. 77. A33.
  78. 78. Q34. Name this non existent book, which is best known from a famous“quote”from 1967 At the outset, this book does not exist. The concept that the fictional book discusses dates back to 17th century Japan. The word / concept was introduced to the West after an 1899 book by Nitobe Inazo, which described this ”book”as “unuttered and unwritten…an organic growth of decades and centuries of military career…” The fictional book became hugely popular after 1967, on the basis of a memorable quote from it. However, the quote itself betrays ignorance, as the creature referenced is not found in Japan. What is this“book”? How was it erroneously referenced in 1967?
  79. 79. A34. Bushido. Opening shot of“Le Samourai” This quote is impossible – no tigers in Japan “There is no solitude greater than a Samurai's, unless perhaps it is that of a tiger in the jungle."
  80. 80. Q35. Who worked these references into his nine canto ”philosophical poem”with seventeen“notes”? Why? From Canto III Now to the meal Of silence, grandeur and excess he drags His palled unwilling appetite. If gold, Gleaming around, and numerous viands culled From every clime could force the loathing sense To overcome satiety From Canto VIII ‘The lion now forgets to thirst for blood; There might you see him sporting in the sun Beside the dreadless kid; his claws are sheathed, His teeth are harmless, custom’s force has made His nature as the nature of a lamb.
  81. 81. A35. Percy Bysshe Shelley He was a Vegetarian.
  82. 82. Q36. Name this Pirandello one act play. What was it selected for in 1930? This play is an one act, half an hour long “dialogue” in a bar, between a man dying of an epithelioma tumour and another man who is idly getting a drink, waiting for a train. The play is short, has only three characters (including the dying man’s wife), and is set entirely within the bar. Given these characteristics – what was it selected for, thus becoming the the first of many? What was the play called, based on the characteristic appearance of an epithelioma?
  83. 83. A36. The Man With The Flower In His Mouth First BBC Television Play
  84. 84. Q37. Which author is this, chronicling the filming of which of his novels? Director Tad Danielewski “brushed aside my comments and went on with his own explanation of what I must have had in mind when I created such and such character. I began to realise that monologue is the privilege of the filmmaker, and that it was futile to try butting in with my own observations. [..] they seemed to need my presence, though not my voice. I must be seen and not heard.” Meanwhile, the crew met in hotel pools, an elaborate set constructed on a floodplain got washed out and the heroine didn’t want to be kissed (“the hero, for his part, was willing to obey the director, but he was helpless, since kissing is a collaborative effort”) Bosley Crowther, in a February 1965 NYT review, wrote about the heroine: “Miss ______, too, is unable to fulfill the nature of her role, which is that of a flighty little creature with no talent save to dance and make love. Miss _______, beautiful and stately, is aptly decorative and poised, but she is no more the _______ of the context than she is a libidinous Peter Pan.”
  85. 85. A37. R.K.Narayan / The Guide
  86. 86. Q38. What poem is this pilot quoting? As you can see in this frame from a Commando Comic, a Soviet Air Force pilot has just shot up a German tank that is passing through a wood, and left it in flames. As he flies away, which famous poem does he remember the very apt opening line of?
  87. 87. Q38. Larger version
  88. 88. A38.
  89. 89. Q39. What was the second case due to which this new court was established? The Court of Criminal Appeal was an English appellate court for criminal cases, established in 1907. It superseded the Court for Crown Cases Reserved, to which referral had been solely discretionary and which could only consider points of law. This new court was primarily set to up review earlier verdicts which had caused disquiet in legal circles. In particular, this was because of two controversial verdicts. The first, the case of one Adolph Beck, was proven to be a case of wrongful conviction by mistaken identity, erroneous eyewitness testimony, and a rush to convict the accused. The second case was reflective of racist bias and involved a local solicitor being tried and convicted for attacks on domestic and farm animals. He was later exonerated in 1906, after a public personality had intervened, “investigated” and proved that he could not be guilty. You can just give me the first names of the public personality and the accused.
  90. 90. A39.
  91. 91. Q40. What was this“distinctive type of a New Yorker”known as? To New Yorkers of this Author and Journalist’s generation, a "_____ _______ character" evoked a distinctive type from Brooklyn or Midtown Manhattan. He wrote funny and sentimental short stories about the underbelly of New York - gamblers, hustlers, actors, and gangsters with names like "Nathan Detroit", "Benny Southstreet", "Harry the Horse", "Good Time Charley", "Dave the Dude", or "The Seldom Seen Kid”, who spoke in a mixture of formal, even pompous speech and colorful slang, almost completely in the present tense. E C Bentley (of Clerihew fame) once claimed that he had seen one actual instance of a word in past tense in the author’s work, though he also said that it was surely a misprint.
  92. 92. A40. Damon Runyon
  93. 93. Q41. Which book, named from a Chinese term for“patterns of organic energy”? This 1979 book was a popular science work exploring modern physics, and, in particular, quantum phenomena. An award winner at the 1980 U.S. National Book Awards, it attracted attention for using Eastern spirituality to explain quantum phenomena and, as such, has been considered to be more of a“New Age”work. The central term that forms part of the title is allegedly a translation of the word "physics" in Chinese; meaning "patterns of organic energy." As the term is an atonal pinyin phrase, it can also be read as “"Nonsense", "My Way" and "I Clutch My Ideas” – all of which are chapter names in this work, which you have to name.
  94. 94. A41.
  95. 95. Q42. The original work and the famous poem about the work An English dramatist, translator and poet, he has also been suggested as one candidate for the Rival Poet of Shakespeare's sonnets. He was a successful playwright of satires (one of which got him arrested for lampooning the Scots, and another riled the French ambassador). He wrote what he is best known for over almost two decades from 1598- 1616, publishing it in several instalments, partly because what he was doing also involved a change in meter from the original work, as well as more descriptive detail and moral interpretations. This however fetched him very little money, more so because his main patron died before he completed the work, and he died in poverty. After reading and being disappointed with Alexander Pope's version of a similar work, ____ _____ read this man's version and was moved to compose one of his most famous poems about the work. ID the original work being referenced, and also the famous poem about the work.
  96. 96. A42. Chapman’s Homer, John Keats ‘On First Looking Into Chapman’s Homer’
  97. 97. Q43. What threat did Conan Doyle predict in 1914 and what solution did he propose? In Arthur Conan Doyle’s 1914 short story “Danger!”, the threat was from the country of Norland (a fictionalized Germany) which, through means of a certain strategy, defeated Britain in a matter of weeks. Military experts all agreed that the threat was theoretically possible, but they were convinced that no European power would stoop to such a dastardly measure. History would however prove Conan Doyle right – a German minister said in 1917: "The only prophet of the present economic war was […] Conan Doyle." What had he predicted in 1914 that nearly crippled Great Britain in both World Wars? In order to nullify this threat, the story recommended that Britain achieve self sufficiency in food, and also recommended a ”crackpot” idea dating back to the 19th century. Conan Doyle tried to get it off the ground, but it fizzled out due to engineering and financial challenges. What was this second suggestion?
  98. 98. A43. Submarines, Channel Tunnel The threat was that of submarine warfare against merchant shipping. Military thinking of the time still considered European wars a Gentlemanly conflict of sorts, in which no nation would stoop to attacking civilian targets. Germany did so in both World Wars. Conan Doyle proposed “the immediate construction of not one, but two double lined railways under the channel” - something that was not achieved till the Chunnel came into being.
  99. 99. Q44. Who co authored these thrillers? Send Him Victorious (1968), about a Tory prime minister attempting to suppress the white settler rebellion in Rhodesia, only to face an attempted coup by his party’s right wing. The Smile on the Face of the Tiger (1969), about a Chinese ultimatum for the immediate end of British occupation of Hong Kong and its handover. Scotch on the Rocks (1971), about a political crisis in Scotland in which the Scottish National Party emerged as a serious force, and its fringe paramilitary organisation, the Scottish Liberation Army, staged a military rising. These were bestsellers, and drew their realism and authenticity of plot from their authors’ diplomatic and military experience. One of the authors was Andrew Osmond, a former Gurkha officer and diplomat turned editor of Private Eye Magazine. His co-author, a man with even more experience in international diplomacy, was much more well known. Name him.
  100. 100. A44. Douglas Hurd, UK Foreign Secretary under Thatcher & John Major
  101. 101. Q45. This phrase, which titled a 1979 book The earliest use of this phrase meaning a combination of ambition, determination and courage comes from 1848. In a letter by Herman Melville to his first publisher, John Murray of London: “The arrangement you propose for my next book is not altogether satisfactory to me. At the least, I shall want the advance doubled. It shall have ____ _____ _____ …to redeem its faults, tho’ they were legion.” This phrase was used to title a 1979 book about the early years of the US space program.
  102. 102. A45.
  103. 103. Q46. Which book was Fielding’s“Joseph Andrews”a parody of? Henry Fielding’s “Joseph Andrews” (1742) started off as a parody, but developed into a novel in its own right. This quixotic tale is the story of a footman's adventurous travels with his friend and mentor. The novel followed from another parody by Fielding, which took aim at what he saw as the hypocrisies of a literary sensation from another author in 1741 – a tale of virtue’s triumph over immorality. This popular book formed the initial background for “Joseph Andrews”, by way of his familial ties to the central character of that book. What was this book? And what familial tie that linked the two?
  104. 104. A46. ’Pamela’, by Samuel Richardson Joseph Andrews was her brother.
  105. 105. Q47. Name the character (or the novel) This 1921 novel by Jaroslav Hašek was one of the first anti-war novels, predating Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front. Joseph Heller has been quoted as saying that he could not have written Catch 22 without first reading this unfinished World War I satire. The protagonist displays such enthusiasm about faithfully serving the Austrian Emperor in battle that no one can decide whether he is merely an imbecile or is craftily undermining the war effort. The novel proved so popular that Bertolt Brecht wrote a play about the further adventures of this character in WW2. The character’s name has become an idiomatic Czech expression for military absurdity. His name is even to be found in English dictionaries, defined as "A person likened to the character of _______, pictured as an unlucky and simple- minded but resourceful little man oppressed by higher authorities”.
  106. 106. A47. The Good Soldier Švejk (or Schweik)
  107. 107. Q48. Name this book ____ _____ is a 1999 bestseller that followed on the heels of the protests outside the 1999 WTO Ministerial Conference in Seattle. It rapidly became one of the most influential books about the alter-globalization movement. The book focuses on branding and is set in 4 parts. The first 3 parts are No Space No Choice No Jobs The 4th part is also the title of the book, and discusses various movements that have sprung up during the 1990s, such as the culture-jamming movement, Reclaim the Streets and so on, as well as the various movements aimed at putting an end to sweatshop labour. What is the title of the book?
  108. 108. A48.
  109. 109. Q49. Either name the poet OR Quote the first and last lines of the poem The authorship of this Elegy has been disputed, and attributed to various others such as Sir Walter Raleigh. It was printed soon after the 1586 Babington plot, in a book to celebrate Queen Elizabeth I's survival and to attack the plotters. Scholars generally recognize that the poet was one of the plotters. Confined in the Tower of London, on the eve of his execution by evisceration, hanging, drawing and quartering, he wrote a letter to his wife that contained 3 stanzas of poetry - the Elegy. It is a dark look at a life cut short and is a favorite of many scholars to this day, with its heavy use of antithesis on almost every line. Two other poems by this poet are known –“To His Friend”and“The Housedove”. You can either name him, or quote either the (famous) first or the last line from the elegy. This IS a serious lit quiz, after all, and should reward both factual information as well as actual knowledge of the poem.
  110. 110. A49. Chidlock Tichborne
  111. 111. Q50. The book and its author The title of this 1855 book derives from the traditional call of wherries (boat taxis) on the Thames, which would call "________ __!" and "________ __!" to let passengers know of their destination. The second blank is an interjection, part of the call to attract passengers. A favourite of children’s literature, this book recounts the adventures of a young man who follows Sir Francis Drake to sea, has various adventures in the Caribbean sea and Venezuela seeking gold, and eventually returns to England at the time of the Spanish Armada.
  112. 112. A50.
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Persiflage - the 2016 Books Quiz at the Karnataka Quiz Association. Finals.

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