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Youth (un)employment
Key facts and recent policy measures
Sladjana PETKOVIC
EYC Budapest, September 2014
Youth unemployment trends in the EU
• Youth unemployment rates are generally much higher than
unemployment rates for all a...
Facts and figures
• In September 2013, 5.584 million young people (under 25)
were unemployed in the EU28, of whom 3.548 mi...
Potential risks
• Comparative data: in 2011 almost 30% of European youth
were at risk of poverty or social exclusion, as o...
Discrimination on the labour market?
• A secured minimum income that allows for a dignified and
autonomous life is a core ...
Policy responses
• Under the European Employment Strategy, employment is
central to the European Semester process to promo...
Initiatives of the EU
• The European Commission has launched several initiatives to
tackle the steadily increasing numbers...
Initiatives of the EU
The Youth Employment Package(2012):
• Youth Guarantee schemes: to help ensure that all young
people ...
Youth Guarantee
• A new approach to tackling youth unemployment which ensures that all
young people under 25 – whether reg...
How it works?!
• Developing and delivering a Youth Guarantee scheme requires strong
cooperation between all the key stakeh...
Implementation?!
• 18 Youth Guarantee pilot projects were launched between August and
December 2013 and each run for aroun...
So far so good?!
• Commission reviews 18 pilot projects (09/09/2014).
• Commissioner for Employment, Social Affairs and In...
Examples of (good) practice
• ‘Success story’: Finland has developed a comprehensive Youth Guarantee
scheme. A Eurofound e...
Apprenticeship and traineeship programmes
• The Traineeships should increase the employability of young people and
be step...
Thank you!
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Youth employment policies - S. Petkovic/ Seminar on youth transition to work and labour life September 2014

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Youth employment policies - S. Petkovic/ Seminar on youth transition to work and labour life September 2014

  1. 1. Youth (un)employment Key facts and recent policy measures Sladjana PETKOVIC EYC Budapest, September 2014
  2. 2. Youth unemployment trends in the EU • Youth unemployment rates are generally much higher than unemployment rates for all ages. • The economic crisis has affected the young more than other age groups: more than30% of unemployed young people are long-term unemployed, that 7.5million young Europeans aged 15-24 are not in employment, education or training (the so-called ‘NEET’s), as well as that young people are over- represented in temporary and part-time work. • Disparities in youth unemployment rates between member states remain high.
  3. 3. Facts and figures • In September 2013, 5.584 million young people (under 25) were unemployed in the EU28, of whom 3.548 million were in the euro area. Compared with September 2012 youth unemployment decreased by 57,000 in the EU28, but increased by 8,000 in the euro area. In September 2013, the youth unemployment rate was 23.5% in the EU28 and 24.1% in the euro area, compared with 23.1% and 23.6% respectively in September 2012. In September 2013, the lowest rates were observed in Germany (7.7%) and Austria (8.7%), and the highest in Greece (57.3% in July 2013), Spain (56.5%) and Croatia (52.8% in the third quarter of 2013).
  4. 4. Potential risks • Comparative data: in 2011 almost 30% of European youth were at risk of poverty or social exclusion, as opposed to 24.2% for the entire population. The risk of being working poor is higher in the southern European countries such as Greece, Italy, Portugal and Spain as well as in some new Member States, including Poland and the Baltic countries. Eurostat, People at Risk of Poverty of Social Exclusion (January 2013). • The ‘at risk’ groups of being working poor are closely related to those who are at risk of not being in employment, education or training (the NEETs).
  5. 5. Discrimination on the labour market? • A secured minimum income that allows for a dignified and autonomous life is a core element of quality jobs for young people across Europe. • The imposition and reinforcement of a lower minimum wage for young people, irrespective of working experience or capability, has been understood not only as a flagrant disregard for the most vulnerable demographic group on the labour market, but also as an evidence of discrimination on the basis of age (European Youth Forum 2013).
  6. 6. Policy responses • Under the European Employment Strategy, employment is central to the European Semester process to promote closer policy coordination between Member State governments. The European Commission's Employment Packageof April 2012 proposes measures to support job creation, restore the dynamics of labour markets and reinforce coordination and multilateral surveillance in employment policy. The package also supports the objectives of Europe's growth strategy Europe 2020 (Eurofound, 2013).
  7. 7. Initiatives of the EU • The European Commission has launched several initiatives to tackle the steadily increasing numbers of young people out of work. • The Youth Opportunities Initiative(2011) aiming to help young people who are not in work, education or training by providing the means for them to acquire skills and experience (through a return to school, entry to training, or work experience including volunteering). • It supports unemployed and inactive young people to get into stable work or training by encouraging better targeting of funds, boosting apprenticeships and traineeships, and promoting youth mobility.
  8. 8. Initiatives of the EU The Youth Employment Package(2012): • Youth Guarantee schemes: to help ensure that all young people under 25 get a quality offer of employment, continued education, an apprenticeship or traineeship within four months of leaving school or becoming unemployed. • Youth Employment Initiative: EU funding to support young people in regions where youth unemployment rates are above 25%. • Quality traineeships and apprenticeships: to improve the transition form school to work. • Labour mobility: making it easier for young Europeans to find a job, traineeship or apprenticeship in another EU country.
  9. 9. Youth Guarantee • A new approach to tackling youth unemployment which ensures that all young people under 25 – whether registered with employment services or not – get a good-quality, concrete offer within 4 months of them leaving formal education or becoming unemployed. • The good-quality offer should be for a job, apprenticeship, traineeship, or continued education and be adapted to each individual need and situation. • EU countries endorsed the principle of the Youth Guarantee in April 2013. Youth Guarantee schemes are to be implemented by the EU Member States at relevant levels of governance (national, regional, local).
  10. 10. How it works?! • Developing and delivering a Youth Guarantee scheme requires strong cooperation between all the key stakeholders: public authorities, employment services, career guidance providers, education & training institutions, youth support services, business, employers, trade unions, etc. • Supporting measures: strong partnerships between all stakeholders, early intervention and activation, supportive measure enabling labour market integration, full use of EU Structural Funds (ESF), assessment and continuous improvement of the schemes, and swift implementation. • Early intervention and activation are key and, in many cases, reforms are needed, such as improving vocational education and training systems. • EU countries are currently developing national Youth Guarantee Implementation Plans. • The Commission also facilitates the sharing of best practices between governments, in particular through the European Employment Strategy Mutual Learning Programme.
  11. 11. Implementation?! • 18 Youth Guarantee pilot projects were launched between August and December 2013 and each run for around 12 months. These projects are currently being implemented in seven countries: Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Spain and the United Kingdom. The aim of the projects is to provide Member States with practical relevant experience for implementing their national Youth Guarantee schemes and for related actions using the European Social Fund and Youth Employment Initiative. • The EU Member States have presented national Youth Guarantee Implementation Plans, and their implementation is now starting. • The European Commission monitors implementation of the Youth Guarantee within theEuropean Semester.
  12. 12. So far so good?! • Commission reviews 18 pilot projects (09/09/2014). • Commissioner for Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion, László Andor: "The Youth Guarantee is a structural reform which requires Member States to improve their youth employment policy on all levels. The pilot projects show that this approach works and brings results. The Youth Guarantee is proving to be the most rapidly implemented EU structural reform. The Commission directly works with all Member States to ensure the full and rapid implementation of the Youth Guarantee."
  13. 13. Examples of (good) practice • ‘Success story’: Finland has developed a comprehensive Youth Guarantee scheme. A Eurofound evaluation found that, in 2011, 83.5% of young job seekers received a successful offer within 3 months of registering as unemployed. The Finnish scheme has led to personalised plans for young people being drawn up more quickly, ultimately lowering unemployment. • The Youth Guarantee was nothing new. The scheme was put in place in 2005 to assist people under 25 who have finished their studies but have still not found a job or further training. The scheme’s scope was increased in 2013 to all people under 30. • What about the others (Greece)?! • For an overview of similar national initiatives, see the Commission working document (in 22 EU languages).
  14. 14. Apprenticeship and traineeship programmes • The Traineeships should increase the employability of young people and be stepping stones towards regular employment if they are of good quality in terms of learning content and adequate working conditions. • The EU is supporting Member States to develop high quality apprenticeship and traineeship programmes to: make the school-to-work transition easier, equip young people with the right skills and experience for sustainable employment. • The advice service on apprenticeship and traineeship schemes is available until the end of 2014 and provides: Helpdesk, Research into apprenticeship and traineeship programmes, Events, Join the LinkedIn Group. • The perspective and action of the European social partners.
  15. 15. Thank you!

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