Living Online: Anytime, Anywhere, Any Device- NFAIS 2012

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Riding the crest of the wave of digital
publishing has been a wild one in the
last few years. This talk will explore what lessons we can learn from the past and how they apply to providing content and services in the constantly changing technical landscape that we live in today.

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Living Online: Anytime, Anywhere, Any Device- NFAIS 2012

  1. 1. + Living Online: Any Time, Any Where, Any Device Howard Ratner, Chief Technology Officer, EVP Nature Publishing Group Miles Conrad Lecture NFAIS 54th Annual Conference 27 February 2012
  2. 2. + Who am I?   technology geek   pragmatist   publisher
  3. 3. + Who am I?  High school – 1981  College – 1985  Chelsea House Publishers – 1985-1986  Wiley – 1986-1988  Springer – 1988-2000  Nature Publishing Group – 2000 – present
  4. 4. + Question Time 1.  How many people in this room are carrying a phone? 2.  How many people in this room are using a laptop? 3.  How many people in this room are using a tablet (iPad, etc.) 4.  How many people are using a cloud app?
  5. 5. + “I think there is a TJ Watson world market for about five computers.” Thomas J. Watson, CEO, IBM, 1914-1956
  6. 6. + 1946 ENIAC: Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer
  7. 7. + Centralized   Computers and information centralized   Only in specific locations   Only obtainable locally
  8. 8. + 1970s
  9. 9. + “A computer on Bill Gates in every desktop every home.” Bill Gates, CEO, Microsoft, 1975-2000
  10. 10. + mid 1980s – My College PCs
  11. 11. + 1980s Personal Computing Era Decentralized
  12. 12. + Late 80s - Portable PCs
  13. 13. + 1990s  2000s
  14. 14. +We are morecomputer savvy.Mobile buttethered.Not very social.
  15. 15. + Rise of search engines of all kinds.
  16. 16. + Audio, Podcasts, MP3, Video
  17. 17. Rise of Social Media
  18. 18. + Blogs found a place
  19. 19. + Social Networks took off!
  20. 20. + User behavior changed. We are now social.
  21. 21. + Wireless is in!
  22. 22. +
  23. 23. + Connectivity gets faster and cheaper
  24. 24. + New tech extends battery life 7-10+ hours!
  25. 25. + We and our devices are untethered.
  26. 26. “What we want to do is make a leapfrog productSteve Jobs that is way smarter than any mobile device has ever been, and super-easy to use. This is what iPhone is. OK? So, were going to reinvent the phone.”Steve Jobs, CEO, Apple, 1971-1985,1996-2011
  27. 27. + Apple taught us how to be mobile
  28. 28. + Mobility spreads like wildfire
  29. 29. + We own many devices Computing travels with us
  30. 30. Cloud Users just expect their information to be availableanytime they want it, anywhere they are and in what ever format they need it
  31. 31. + Evernote
  32. 32. DropBox
  33. 33. Pandora
  34. 34. + Computing is becoming ubiquitous.
  35. 35. “Ubiquitous computing namesthe third wave in computing, just nowbeginning.First were mainframes, each shared by lotsof people.Now we are in the personal computing era,person and machine staring uneasily ateach other across the desktop.Next comes ubiquitous computing, or theage of calm technology, when technologyrecedes into the background of our lives.”-- Mark Weiser, Xerox Parc (1990s)
  36. 36. + Ubiquitous Computing   The purpose of a computer is to help you do something else   The best computer is a quiet, invisible servant   The more you can do by intuition the smarter you are; the computer should extend your unconscious   Technology should create calm -- Weiser’s principles (source Wikipedia)
  37. 37. + Pervasive Computing   Decentralization   Local or mobile devices   Information is “networked”   Diversification   Specialized tasks (e.g., Internet access on (laptop, mobile phone, games console, Palm PDA)   Connectivity   Data exchanged between devices   Wireless connection / internet   Simplicity   Seamless, interfaces, intuitive, calm Credit: Andy Hunt, Pervasive Computing
  38. 38. + PC + Tech Companies are seeing it Old OS are merging with the New! Hardware? Irrelevant!
  39. 39. + Mobile Internet Revolution http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUljrP6ILN0&feature=related Credit: Crowdsauce.com, Uploaded April 30, 2011
  40. 40. + What Should the Publishing Community Do?
  41. 41. + Article Particles •  Break articles down into major sections (e.g. scientific methods, data, results) •  Semantically mark-up entities and terms •  Surface concepts with annotations •  Use people, place, thing identifiers •  Build particle connections to other datasets •  APIs allow the building of bolt-on tools and allow us to leverage community effortsDicing and slicing breaks apart journal silos and allows users to search across the corpus of knowledge. We can offer compelling services on a publisher-neutral destination for researchers.
  42. 42. + Linked Open Data?
  43. 43. + Research Objects?Credit: S. Bechhofer et al., “Research Objects: Towards Exchange and Reuse of Digital Knowledge,” 2010
  44. 44. + Developer Platforms & APIs
  45. 45. + Divide it up! Mark it up! Share and shake it up!
  46. 46. + References   Sean Bechhofer et al., “Research Objects: Towards Exchange and Reuse of Digital Knowledge,” Submitted to: The Future of the Web for Collaborative Science (FWCS 2010), April 2010, Raleigh, NC, USA. http://eprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk/18555/   Mark Cuban, “You Don’t Live in the World You Were Born Into” (31 December 2011, Blog Maverick: The Mark Cuban Weblog) http://blogmaverick.com/2011/12/31/you-dont-live-in-the-world-you-were- born-into-4/   Andy Hunt, “Pervasive Computing: History and Key Topics” (University of York course) http://tinyurl.com/8432mk7   Anna Faherty, “The future for publishers is content creation, with a dash of Martini” (7 December 2011, Kingston Publishing: inspiring future publishers) http://tinyurl.com/79ymwo3   Mark Weiser, “The Computer for the 21st Century” (Scientific American, 265, September 1991), http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/scientificamerican0991-94
  47. 47. + Thank you! Howard Ratner CTO & EVP, Nature Publishing Group h.ratner@us.nature.com @hratner

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