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Salt in Relation to Food Advertising:
France from the Late 19th Century
to the Early 20th Century
Prepared by Anna Soo-Hoo...
Canning, developed in the early 19th century by two Frenchmen
Nicolas Appert (1749 – 1841) and Philippe de Girard (1775 – ...
« La Sardine française, Béziers vous salue »
Illustrateur : Benjamin Rabier (1864-1939)
Paris
Date d'édition : 1920
Biblio...
The “Amieux Frères” brand for canned sardines and other foods
Illustrator: Georges Fay (1871-1916)
Dated Issued: 1896-1900...
“Harengs et maquereaux, La Boulonnaise... L. Bouclet.
Boulogne/s/Mer... ” (Herring and Mackerel…)
Illustrateur : Leonetto ...
“Conserves de l'Heureux convive” (The Happy
Guest’s Preserved Foods)
Illustrateur : Leonetto Cappiello (1875-1942)
Paris
D...
Renaissance Art in Italy: Benvenuto Cellini, (c. 1900). Cellini (1500-1571) presents the famous saltcellar to the King of
...
Trading cards introduced in 1872 by the Liebig Company increased
the popularity of its meat extracts and other products. R...
France was one of the markets for the American
meatpacking company Armour & Co.
“Armour & Cie. Chicago, Etats-Unis. Extrai...
Poster: canned goods by the Louis Blachère company
Illustrateur : Eugène Ogé (1861-1936)
Paris
Date d'édition : 1905
http:...
“Mes petits derniers, nourris à la potasse”
(My most recent little ones, nourished on potash)
Date d'édition : c. 1920
Bib...
« L'Alsace, à tout l'Empire, apporte sa potasse »
Illustrateur : Pineau
Date d'édition : c. 1910
Bibliothèque nationale de...
« Potasses d'Alsace : on ne peut obtenir de
rendements élevés en agriculture que par
l'emploi simultané des engrais azotés...
Sources
Appelbaum, Stanley, ed. The Complete "Masters of the Poster": All 256 Color Plates from "Les
Maîtres de l’affiche....
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Salt & Advertising in 19th to the Early 20th Century in France by Anna Soo Hoo for HPFI

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Salt & Advertising in 19th to the Early 20th Century in France by Anna Soo Hoo for HPFI

  1. 1. Salt in Relation to Food Advertising: France from the Late 19th Century to the Early 20th Century Prepared by Anna Soo-Hoo Fall 2015
  2. 2. Canning, developed in the early 19th century by two Frenchmen Nicolas Appert (1749 – 1841) and Philippe de Girard (1775 – 1845), provided an alternative to salting as a way to preserve certain foods, but quite a bit of salt was still used in many canned fish and meat products. For example, a 1901 report about the French sardine industry reveals that one step in the process of preparing sardines for canning involves soaking the sardines in strong brine for an hour. Another canned food product that became popular was meat extracts. Though a French chemist named Proust was acknowledged by Justus von Liebig (1803-1873) as having already created meat extracts, it was Liebig’s formula of using only meat stock and four percent of salt that became well- known. Some food companies, however, soon produced canned meat extracts that were made of 25% added salt. As for growing wheat, fruits, and vegetables, the mining of potash (a salt that can be used as fertilizer) became a lucrative business for certain regions. In southern Alsace, Amélie Zurcher (1858-1947) was persistent in wanting to know if her land could be mined for valuable minerals, and this led to the discovery of potash in the region.
  3. 3. « La Sardine française, Béziers vous salue » Illustrateur : Benjamin Rabier (1864-1939) Paris Date d'édition : 1920 Bibliothèque nationale de France, Gallica http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b9011427x Interesting fact: Benjamin Rabier also illustrated for a popular brand of processed cheese products—La vache qui rit, known to English speakers as The Laughing Cow.
  4. 4. The “Amieux Frères” brand for canned sardines and other foods Illustrator: Georges Fay (1871-1916) Dated Issued: 1896-1900 The New York Public Library http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47da-38b5-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
  5. 5. “Harengs et maquereaux, La Boulonnaise... L. Bouclet. Boulogne/s/Mer... ” (Herring and Mackerel…) Illustrateur : Leonetto Cappiello (1875-1942) Paris Date d'édition : 1912 Bibliothèque nationale de France, Gallica http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b9010470m
  6. 6. “Conserves de l'Heureux convive” (The Happy Guest’s Preserved Foods) Illustrateur : Leonetto Cappiello (1875-1942) Paris Date d'édition : 1911 Bibliothèque nationale de France, Gallica http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b9005959k
  7. 7. Renaissance Art in Italy: Benvenuto Cellini, (c. 1900). Cellini (1500-1571) presents the famous saltcellar to the King of France, Francis I. French advertisement for Liebig's extract of meat. (Photo by The Print Collector/Print Collector/Getty Images) http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/renaissance-art-in-italy-benvenuto-cellini-cellini-presents-news- photo/463950825
  8. 8. Trading cards introduced in 1872 by the Liebig Company increased the popularity of its meat extracts and other products. Regarding the trading card just shown, the saltcellar that Benvenuto Cellini (1500-1571) created for François I (1494-1547) is currently at the Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna.
  9. 9. France was one of the markets for the American meatpacking company Armour & Co. “Armour & Cie. Chicago, Etats-Unis. Extrait de viande, le seul qui conserve la saveur de la viande fraîche [...] : en vente chez les épiciers m[archan]d de comestibles [...]. Agence pour la France, 37 rue Lafayette, Paris” (“Armour & Co meat extract, the only kind that preserves the taste of meat … : available at grocery stores…”) Illustrator: Albert Guillaume (1873-1942) Paris Dated Issued: 1896-1900 The New York Public Library http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47 da-389f-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
  10. 10. Poster: canned goods by the Louis Blachère company Illustrateur : Eugène Ogé (1861-1936) Paris Date d'édition : 1905 http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b9011380z
  11. 11. “Mes petits derniers, nourris à la potasse” (My most recent little ones, nourished on potash) Date d'édition : c. 1920 Bibliothèque nationale de France, Gallica http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b10225160d
  12. 12. « L'Alsace, à tout l'Empire, apporte sa potasse » Illustrateur : Pineau Date d'édition : c. 1910 Bibliothèque nationale de France, Gallica http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b102251591
  13. 13. « Potasses d'Alsace : on ne peut obtenir de rendements élevés en agriculture que par l'emploi simultané des engrais azotés, phosphatés et potassiques... » Illustrateur : Danilo Date d'édition : c. 1930 Bibliothèque nationale de France, Gallica http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b10225122 n/f1.item
  14. 14. Sources Appelbaum, Stanley, ed. The Complete "Masters of the Poster": All 256 Color Plates from "Les Maîtres de l’affiche." New York: Dover, 1990. Calon, Olivier. Benjamin Rabier. Paris: Tallandier, 2004. Freedman, Paul H. Food: The History of Taste. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2007. McMichael, Philip, ed. Food and Agrarian Orders in the World-Economy. Connecticut: Greenwood Publishing Group, 1995. Nouveau Dictionnaire de biographie alsacienne, No. 42, Zo à Zy. Strasbourg: Fédération des Soc. d'Histoire et d'Archéologie d'Alsace, 2003. Robertson, Gordon L. Food Packaging: Principles and Practice, Second Edition. Florida: CRC Press, 2006. Smith, Hugh M. (US Commission of Fish and Fisheries). “The French Sardine Industry.” Popular Science Monthly Oct. 1901: 542-556. The Medical Press. London: Oxford University, 1882. United States. Thirty-first and Thirty-second Annual Reports of the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station. Hartford: The Tuttle, Morehouse, and Taylor Company, 1908.

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