Positive Performance with Rose Gantner

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Positive Performance with Rose Gantner

  1. 1. Positive Performance: Using Positive Psychology to Achieve High-Performing Workplaces Healthpromotionlive.com Rose K. Gantner, Ed.D., NCC Senior Director, Education, Training and Innovation January 13, 2012
  2. 2. Positive Psychology: Components and Rationale A Wise Organization Strategy  H.E.A.R.T. Employers want… Employees want… Components Rationale Stress Management • Go beyond traditional offerings Resiliency •  morale & engagement Positivity • Interventions to build thriving individuals, families , and communities Happiness Mindfulness High correlation between people’s attitudes, purpose and ability to manage stress/resilience Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 2
  3. 3. Align Company Goals & Objectives 1) Individual 2) Interpersonal 3) Organizational Levels Positive Psychology: Definition The scientific study of what enables individuals and communities to thrive o Encompasses neurological, psychological, and physiology aspects o Play to your strengths & strengthen others! History - Maslow‟s self-actualization (1950s) o Martin Seligman, PhD.: father of modern movement (1998) Organization - International Positive Psychology Association (IPPA) Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 3
  4. 4. Research Studies Buck Consultants: Workplace Wellness Strategies - November 2010  1,248 organizations in 47 countries  13 million employees Europe, Asia, Australia, Canada, Latin America, & Africa: • #1 Improve Workforce Morale • #2 Improve Engagement U.S.A. - Not a priority yet: • #1-  Health care costs •  Productivity •  Absenteeism & Presenteeism *Remember, our health care system is different from other countries due to our reimbursement system. Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 4
  5. 5. Research Studies (continued) Harvard School of Public Health (2009) • Optimistic people are less likely to develop hypertension and chronic illnesses, and have less depressive and anxiety symptoms • Positive emotions are linked to improved well-being • Chronic anger, worry, resentment, and anxiety are linked to  risks of developing heart disease as people react to their feelings with  BP and stiffening of blood vessels • Optimism & gratitude are not the same • Optimism=future; Gratitude =past Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 5
  6. 6. Why Optimists Enjoy Better Health Findings 1. Optimistic coronary bypass patients were only 50% as likely as pessimists to require re-hospitalization 2. Highly pessimistic men were three times more likely to develop hypertension 3. People with positive emotions had lower blood pressures 4. More pessimistic men were more than two times more likely to develop heart disease compared with the most optimistic 5. Lower Levels of stress hormones and less inflammation. Reference: Harvard Health Publication, “Living Better, Living Longer,” May 2008. Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 6
  7. 7. Positivity and Quality of Life “People who learn to control inner experiences will be able to determine the quality of their lives.” - Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, PhD Biggest difference between an optimistic and a pessimistic person: – Orientation of the world – Choose: Empowerment or Disempowerment? – Self-efficacy - Belief in self as a problem-solver – Behavior efficacy - Anticipate positive outcomes Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 7
  8. 8. Positive Psychology Components • Each individual needs to find happiness –resilient enhancing strategies that fit his/her personality, goals, values, lifestyle, and beliefs. • “Best possible self exercise”-think about your future in positive ways • Translate intentions, into real actionable small steps. • Learning any positive psychology component is like learning a sport – takes practice and repetition to improve. Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 8
  9. 9. The Reward and Pleasure Circuits Why do we engage in unhealthy habits? Dopamine — DNA Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 9
  10. 10. Positive Emotions & The Brain • Our brain weighs 2.7 lbs. and has 100 billion neurons • It takes only one neuron to build a new memory • Our brain is hardwired to perform at its best when we are positive • Most behaviors: habits (80%); deliberate thinking (20%) • Neurotransmitter, dopamine (pleasure/reward center) • Applying behavior economics & gamification • Do – Learn – Change model (BJ Fogg) Change Behaviors –Whats in it for me? –Ready to change? –Goal & Plan –Support Systems Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 10
  11. 11. The Brain Brain’s Amygdala - almond-shaped structure, cerebral hemispheres, controls: • Happiness: Center-left side of brain; positive emotions • Fear & danger Brain’s resistance to change: will adjust if small steps are taken toward a goal; amygdala will not fire. Self talk – Reframe Resilience protects against negative emotionsReference Book: Traver, Kelly, MD and Sergent, BK. The Program: TheBrain‟s Smart Approach to the Healthiest You, 2009 Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 11
  12. 12. Strengthen Resiliency - 5 Essential Characteristics Researchers: Gail Wagnild, PhD and Heather Young, PhD 1) Meaningful Life (Purpose/Passion) - Most important characteristics 2) Perseverance - Determination despite difficulties 3) Self-Reliance - Belief in self (abilities/capabilities); practice 4) Equanimity - Balance & harmony - reframe 5) Coming home to yourself - Own best friend Resilient people have courage and emotional stamina. Take Resilience Scale-Free Assessment - 14 short questions www.resiliencescale.com Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 12
  13. 13. Resilience Scale – Sample Questions 1-7 scale (7=strongly agree) – 14 total questions  When I make plans, I usually follow through with them.  I feel proud I have accomplished things in my life.  I can get through difficult times because I‟ve experienced difficulty before.  I can usually look at a situation in a number of ways.  When I am in a difficult situation, I can find my way out of it. Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 13
  14. 14. Resilience = Emotional Agility • Worry Less • Mindfulness • Openness • Bounce back • Kindness • Social Fabric • Flexibility Teach people to let go of negative patterns of thinking. Reframe statements - ”If only______” “So what if only____” Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 14
  15. 15. Resilient Personality Styles More open to change; creative Faster cardiovascular recovery Less stress and more focus on joy and peace Fewer health issues Less cost and increased well-being and life span More resilient in face of adversity Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 15
  16. 16. Positivity Ratio – Tipping Point 3:1 RatioCopyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Learn. Unlearn. Relearn.Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 16
  17. 17. Positivity Feels Good • Broadens mind and heart • Increases creativity and collaboration • Builds resources • Fuels resiliency • Can be learned and improved – Great to  a team/committee’s cooperation, collaboration, and results! Dream Big! Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 17
  18. 18. Connectedness We are influenced by others in three degrees of separation: • Individual level Socially Connected: If overweight, friend • At work has a 57% chance of • Relationships also being overweight If smoker, quits, friend is 34% more likely to quit smoking Social networks can spread happiness, generosity, and love Ref: Christakis, W. MD, PhD and Fowler, J. PhD, Connected: The Surprising Power of Our Social Networks and How They Shape Our Lives, 2009 Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 18
  19. 19. Happiness/Health Connection Strengths connected to happiness-gratitude, hope, faith, love, vitality, & curiosity; a combination of meaning & pleasure  Happier people have: – Decreased health risks: fewer chronic conditions – Decreased psychological factors – Increased well-being; purpose and passion for bigger social good – Increased social connections – Increased feeling of safety and sense of belonging Book: Buettner, Dan, Blue Zones: Lessons for Living Longer from People Who Lived the Longest, 2008 Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 19
  20. 20. Happiness … Formula? Research: Instilling happiness in the workforce increases teamwork, leadership, productivity, morale, and work-life balance. Happiness formula: HSCA (trait & state) Sonja Lyubomirsky, University of California iPhone App- “Live Happy” (8 activities) Definition H = Happiness S = Set point C = Circumstances A = Intentional Activities – Choices • 50% = Genetic • 10% = Circumstances – noise, commuting distances • 40% = Under your internal control and choices (takes work & practice) Book: Sonya Lyubomirsky, the How of Happiness, 2010 Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 20
  21. 21. Things That Will Make You Happy Researchers: Martin Seligman, PhD and Christopher Peterson, PhD 1) Feeling Good: Seek pleasurable emotions (loving and being loved; skills and challenges) • Positive thinking (gratitude & optimism) 2. Engaging Fully: “Flow” (hobbies, interests, activities, clubs, community) • Social activities-”best possible self exercise” 3. Doing Good – Social Good: Volunteering with passion and purpose; bigger than self 4. Check Websites: www.authentichappiness.com (Seligman) www.positiveratio.com (Fredrickson) www.resiliencescale.com (Wagnild) www.viacharacter.org (signature strengths survey) Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 21
  22. 22. Things That Won’t Make You Happy You Happy Things That Won‟t Make Money and materialistic objects – looking in all the wrong places • Searching for the fountain of youth • Economist – Richard Easterlin„s research: People in poor countries are happier where their basic necessities are covered • Beyond that, $75,000.00 is not a factor • Lottery winners, a year later, are no more happier than a control group of people who did not win • Happy employees take fewer sick days (15 days/year) Source: Gallup Healthways Well-Being Index (November 2011) . Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 22
  23. 23. Happiness & Longevity Studies Research supports: Hopeful people:  Happiness appears to  Decreased hypertension protect against illness  Decreased diabetes  More satisfied people gain 7.5 to 10 years of life  Decreased respiratory tract infections  Nunn Study: Positive emotions and writing Key: Stay in the present moment and accept the situation. Happiness is a continuum. Practice kindness and compassion. Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 23
  24. 24. Six Virtues = Strengths 1. Wisdom (Intellectual Strengths) • Creativity • Love Learning 2. Courage (Accomplish Goals) • Integrity Strengths are built-in • Bravery capabilities for certain 3. Temperance (Stay on Track) thoughts, feelings, and • Forgiveness behaviors. • Humility 4. Justice (Social and Civic Strengths) PLAY TO YOUR • Teamwork and Leadership STRENGTHS! • Fairness 5. Transcendence (Connectedness to the World) • Apprentice of Beauty, Spirituality, Gratitude, Hope, Humor 6. Humanity (Love and Kindness) • Social Intelligence • Emotional Intelligence Reference: Positive Psychology, Harvard Publication – www.healthharvard.edu Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 24
  25. 25. Flow = Higher Engagement and Satisfaction Flow = Higher Engagement & Satisfaction Researcher: Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi • People report greatest satisfaction when they are totally immersed in and concentrating on what they are doing • In “flow” • You lose awareness of time • You aren’t interrupted by extra thoughts • You clearly have defined goals – each moment • You are active • You work effortlessly • You would like to repeat the experience 3x more flow when working than when during leisure time activity Procrastination is the enemy of flow – start with small chunks for success Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 25
  26. 26. Mindfulness “Mindfulness is not so much about doing as about being.” – John Kabat-Zinn, Ph D • Practice of focusing your attention on the present moment – Accepting it without judgment • Mindfulness linked to happier and more resilient relationships • Learned techniques: breathing, mediation, attention • Takes effort and practice • Latest research: “Loving Kindness Meditation” (Fredrickson, 2011) o Self-Regulate Love Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 26
  27. 27. Example of Mindful Eating • Based on Buddhist concept of mindfulness –moment. •  Stress,  High Blood Pressure and chronic gastrointestinal difficulties. • Mind – gut connection: It takes 20 minutes for our brain to register fullness. • Eat slower; put down fork between bites. • Mindful eating - Notice colors, smells, and texture of foods; chew slowly. • Don‟t eat in front of the TV. • Take small bites & chew well. • Learn portion control. Ref. Harvard Medical School, June 2010 Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 27
  28. 28. Five Essential Elements of Well-Being• Transcends 150 countries and cultures• Universal elements of well-being Career Social Financial Physical Community• 66% of people doing well in at least one of the areas• Only 7% thriving in all five• Question: – Do you like what you do each day at work? Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 28
  29. 29. Questions As an employee are you_________? • Engaged: high-performer, creative, & passionate = 30% • Disengaged: not happy and “checked out” = 52% • Actively disengaged: employee “acts out” their dissatisfaction = 18% Talented employees want an adult partnership with their supervisors Good companies want to recruit and retain top talent to remain competitive in the global marketplace Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 29 Ref, Gallop poll 2010
  30. 30. Why Engagement & Satisfaction Matter Companies with employees who report high levels of satisfaction (trust & support) experience:  Absenteeism  Presenteeism  Turnover Rates  Substance Abuse Drivers of both engagement and satisfaction relate to components of Trust, Fairness, Autonomy & Meaningful Work Ref. Schneider, Benjamin, SHRM, 2009 Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 30
  31. 31. Purpose • Roy M. Spence Jr. book: “It’s Not What You Sell, It’s What You Stand For: Why Every Extraordinary Business is Driven by Purpose” (www.itsnotwhatyousell.com) • Aided companies as Southwest Airlines, Whole Foods and Walmart o Financial & community growth Purpose in place: o  Engagement: Same as culture of health in place (3x more engaged employees) o  Innovation o  Customer loyalty to brand Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 31
  32. 32. Tips for Increasing Healthy Engagement in the Workplace • Make health and well-being an impartial asset • Be a champion for self and others • Lead by example • Be kind – nice matters to people • Be open and enthusiastic • Be flexible and adaptable – agility • Be open to change and uncertainty • Be professional – mutual respect • Be optimistic – happier, fulfilled person • Be willing and able to do your part Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 32
  33. 33. Increase Motivation in the Workplace • Be a transparent & authentic leader • Provide role clarity; clear expectations • Provide feedback to all members • Help connect employees‟ efforts to bigger mission & purpose • Remember that every employee can make valuable contributions • Practice Prosocial motivation-Protect & Promote well-being of others Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 33
  34. 34. Positive Engagement • Individual’s thoughts and actions • Choices/personal responsibility • Social relationships Enthusiasm and Internal Drivers Balance and Flow Interest (Passion) Optimal Experience ENJOYMENT CHALLENGE External Outcomes Drivers• Influence Behaviors Individual, Team and Organizational Environment/Culture• Increase or Decrease Individual Engagement MEANING ***Research by Soldati (2007) supports highly engaged employees outperform their disengaged Drive and Purpose counterparts by 20-28 percentage points. Bigger than Self Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights Reserved Company name – LIT CODE - DATE 34 Ref: Martin Stairs and Martin Galpin, “Positive Engagement: From Employee Engagement to Workplace Happiness,” p. 160.
  35. 35. Dr. Rose K. Gantner gantnerrk@upmc.edu Available March, 2012Copyright 2011 UPMC WorkPartners All Rights ReservedCompany name – LIT CODE - DATE 35

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