Employee Safety & Health Beyond the Workplace with Tess Benham

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Employee Safety & Health Beyond the Workplace with Tess Benham

  1. 1. Safety and HealthBeyond the Workplace Tess Benham March 18, 2011 ®
  2. 2. National Safety Council • Nonprofit organization since 1913 • Leader in safety excellence • MISSION: The National Safety Council saves lives by preventing injuries and deaths at work, in homes and communities, and on the roads, through leadership, research, education and advocacy. • Partnering with businesses, government agencies, elected officials and the publicnsc.org
  3. 3. NSC: Leading Safety Advocate • Leader in workplace, First Aid and Defensive Driver Training • Strategic initiatives – Workplace safety: Journey to Safety Excellence TM – Cell phone use while driving: #1 driver distraction – Teen driving safety: #1 cause of death for teens – Safety off the job: Where 9 out of 10 deaths occur • 54,000 members • Chapters throughout U.S. • Global networks in 100+ countriesnsc.org
  4. 4. How You Know Us • Safety advocacy – Nationwide call to ban cell phone use while driving – Graduated Driver Licensing legislation • Congress & Expo – largest annual gathering of safety professionals • Research – Journal of Safety Research, Injury Facts, Workplace benchmarking surveys • Safety+Health – leading source of occupational safety and health information • Safe Communities America – U.S. certifying center for World Health Organization programnsc.org
  5. 5. Journey to Safety Excellence • Safety philosophy of continuous improvement – Engage leadership and employees in safety – Risk reduction Below zero – Performance measurement – Managing and advancing safety management systems Making Our World Safernsc.org
  6. 6. Unintentional Injuries:What’s the national situation? ®
  7. 7. Recent Trends Death Rate Indexes (1992=100) 180 Workplace death rate* down 33%. 170 160 150 140 Workplace 130 120 110 100 90 80 70 60 92 94 96 98 00 02 04 06 08 19 19 19 19 20 20 20 20 20 *Deaths per 100,000 workers.nsc.org Source: Injury Facts, 2011 Ed.
  8. 8. Recent Trends (Cont.) Death Rate Indexes (1992=100) 180 Highway death rate* down 34%. 170 160 150 140 Highway 130 Workplace 120 110 100 90 80 70 60 92 94 96 98 00 02 04 06 08 19 19 19 19 20 20 20 20 20 *Deaths per 100 million vehicle-miles traveled.nsc.org Source: Injury Facts, 2011 Ed.
  9. 9. Recent Trends (Cont.) Death Rate Indexes (1992=100) Home & Community death rate* up 74%. 180 170 160 150 140 Home & 130 Community 120 Highway 110 100 Workplace 90 80 70 60 92 94 96 98 00 02 04 06 08 19 19 19 19 20 20 20 20 20 *Deaths per 100,000 population.nsc.org Source: Injury Facts, 2011 Ed.
  10. 10. Recent Trends (Cont.) Death Rate Indexes (1992=100) Total U-I death rate* up 23%. 180 170 160 150 140 Home & 130 Community 120 Highway 110 100 90 Workplace 80 70 60 Total 92 94 96 98 00 02 04 06 08 19 19 19 19 20 20 20 20 20nsc.org Source: Injury Facts, 2011 Ed.
  11. 11. Unintentional Injuries • #1 cause of death for people 1 to 42 years old • #5 cause of death for all ages Source: Injury Facts, 2011 Ed.nsc.org
  12. 12. Leading Causes of Death, 2007 Heart disease 616,067 Cancer 562,875 Stroke 135,952 Chronic lower respiratory disease 127,924 Unintentional injuries 123,706 Alzheimer’s disease 74,632 Source: National Center for Health Statisticsnsc.org
  13. 13. Unintentional Injuries • In 2008, 38.9 million people – 1 in 9 – sought medical consultation for an injury.nsc.org Source: Injury Facts, 2011 Ed.
  14. 14. Costs of Injuries (2008) • $693.5 billion • $5,900 per household • $2,300 per person • Paid… – directly out of pocket, and – higher prices for goods and services, and – higher taxesnsc.org
  15. 15. What does “off-the-job” mean? • Not on the job • Includes – – People employed (full- or part-time) but not at work • Excludes – – Children – Persons keeping house full time – Retired – Unemployed – Other persons not in the labor forcensc.org
  16. 16. “Off-the-job” or “non-work” injuries? • Off-the-job includes the part of – Motor-vehicle – Home and Community involving workers away from work • Non-work includes all of – Motor-vehicle – Home and Communitynsc.org
  17. 17. OTJ Compared to On the Job On-The-Job Off-the-Job • 141 million workers at risk • 141 million workers at risk • 3,582 on-the-job deaths • 55,800 worker OTJ • 5.1 million medically deaths consulted injuries • 14.4 million worker OTJ • $168.9 billion in costs to medically consulted society injuries • $246.8 billion in OTJ costs to society Source: Injury Facts, 2011 Ed.nsc.org
  18. 18. Home & Community Deaths 42% are Workers 37,600 Workers 52,700 Non-workers Source: Injury Facts, 2011 Ed.nsc.org
  19. 19. Off vs. On-the-Job Deaths – 16:1 60,000 50,000 40,000 On-the-Job 30,000 55,800 Off-the-Job 20,000 10,000 3,582 0 Deaths Source: Injury Facts, 2011 Ed.nsc.org
  20. 20. Off vs. On-the-Job Injuries – 3:1 16 14 12 (Millions) 10 On-the-Job 8 14.4 Off-the-Job 6 4 2 5.1 0 Medically Consulted Injuries Source: Injury Facts, 2011 Ed.nsc.org
  21. 21. Time Lost from Work – 6:1 900 800 700 600 545 Days 500 In Future Years (Millions) 400 In 2009 300 200 255 100 45 55 0 On-the-Job Off-the-Jobnsc.org Source: Injury Facts, 2011 Ed.
  22. 22. Average Age at Death andRemaining Lifetime 90 80 11 10 12 15 70 60 40 Average Years 50 Remaining 40 77 78 76 Lifetime 71 Average Age 30 at Death 20 41 10 0 Heart Cancer Stroke CLRD* U-I Disease * Chronic Lower Respiratory DiseaseSource: NSC estimates based on 2007 NCHS data.nsc.org
  23. 23. What the previous graph means • People who die from unintentional injuries are, on average, 20 to 25 years younger than people who die from other leading causes of death. • They are still working. • They are still raising families. • They would have lived, on average, another 27 years.nsc.org
  24. 24. Affect on Workers’and Their Families ®
  25. 25. All Accidental Deaths: 49% are Workers Home & Highway (Non-Work) Community Workers Workplace (Hwy + non-Hwy) nsc.org Source: National Safety Council estimates.
  26. 26. All Accidental Deaths: 63% are Workers or Their Family Members Home & Highway Community (Non-Work) Workers: Workers’ spouses & children: Workplace (Hwy + non-Hwy) nsc.orgSource: National Safety Council estimates.
  27. 27. Why focus on the workplace? • Workplace programs have direct access to the American workforce – 141 million workers • These programs can reach beyond the workplace and address family safety and health • Policies become personal habits – workplace policies influence about 65% of all adults* Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Employment Situation Summary. February 2011.nsc.org
  28. 28. Trends • 80% of companies with 50 employees or more offer worksite health promotion programs. – Less information is known about the extent that off-the-job injury prevention is included in corporate health promotion efforts. – 35% to 80% of NSC members report including off-the-job injury prevention in company health promotion activities. • Activity ranges from general awareness to fully integrated employee safety, health and wellness management systems.nsc.org
  29. 29. Current Science • Evidence shows that worksite health and safety promotion and wellness programs have been effective – More productive employees – Lower absenteeism • Employers with healthier employees spend less on: – Direct medical costs – Worker’s compensation or disability costs – Replacement costs for ill or injured employees – Costs for training or recruiting new employeesnsc.org
  30. 30. Current Science • Positive cost-benefit ratio ranges – for every dollar spent on health promotion and wellness programs generates positive cost savings. • Some interventions may need 3-5 years before significant savings or health improvements are shown.nsc.org
  31. 31. Workplace Influence of Family Safety & Health At IBM, 11,631 employees completed the voluntary, web-based program and earned the $150 rebate. During the 12-week program, participants chose family goals from a list of options, such as limiting fast food to once per week, walking children to school at least once per week, limiting video games to 30 minutes per day or involving children in meal preparation once per week. Results • Family physical activity increased by 17.1 % • Eating healthy dinners five nights a week increased by 11.8 % • Limiting screen time to a maximum of 1 hour/day increased by 8.3 % in children and 6.1% for adults Study authors suggest the results show that employers can improve short-term behaviors in children and parents in physical activity, meal planning and screen times. Source: American Academy of Pediatrics, An Observational Study of an Employer Intervention for Childrens Healthy Weight Behaviors, published in the November 2010 issue of Pediatrics.nsc.org
  32. 32. Addressing the Issues ®
  33. 33. NSC Activities Journey to Safety Excellence - Beyond the Workplace – Family Safety & Health Employer Resource • http://beyondworkplace.nsc.org – Family Safety & Health Webinar Series • http://nsc.org/webinars – Our Driving Concern • Employer Traffic Safety Program • http://ourdrivngconcern.nsc.org – Benchmarking Tool (in development)nsc.org
  34. 34. Family Safety & Health Employer Resource • Developed in consultation with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention experts • Promotes healthy and safe behaviors and targets the leading causes of employee injury, illness and death • Focuses on primary prevention Features – Scalable: designed to fit organizations of any size – Flexible: can be adjusted to meet your specific needs and resources – Open-ended: provides direction and tools for you to create your own personalize initiativensc.org
  35. 35. nsc.org
  36. 36. Family Safety & Health Employer Resource Contents – A compilation of the recommended elements, materials and tools – Consists of several easy-to-implement modules. – Include background information, assessments, tools, resources, materials and program elements Modules – Building Your Family Safety and Health Program – Driving Safety – Preventing Unintentional Overdoses – Vaccine-Preventable Disease – Tobacco Cessation – Increasing Physical Activity (coming this month) – Healthy Eating (coming soon) Visit beyondworkplace.nsc.orgnsc.org
  37. 37. Contact Information Tess Benham Program Manager, Family Safety & Health Initiatives National Safety Council 1121 Spring Lake Dr. Itasca, IL 60143 630-775-2250 Tess.Benham@nsc.org Visit beyondworkplace.nsc.orgnsc.org
  38. 38. Appendix ®
  39. 39. Home & Community Trends 100,000 30 90,000 28 80,000 26 Death Rate Deaths 70,000 24 60,000 22 50,000 20 40,000 18 30,000 16 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 Deaths Deaths per 100,000 population Source: Injury Facts, 2011 Ed.nsc.org
  40. 40. Home & Community Deaths, 2009 40,000 35,000 30,000 25,000 Age 65+ 20,000 Age 15-64 15,000 Age 0-14 10,000 5,000 0 lls * g ng es ng n Fa ni am ni ki o w ho Fl is ro Po s/ C D re Fi *Inhalation or ingestion of food or object obstructing breathing.nsc.org Source: Injury Facts, 2011 Ed.
  41. 41. Trends in Leading Causes Home & Community 45,000 40,000 35,000 30,000 Falls PoisoningDeaths 25,000 Choking* 20,000 Drowning 15,000 Fire, Burn 10,000 5,000 0 92 94 96 98 00 02 04 06 08 10 19 19 19 19 20 20 20 20 20 20 *Inhalation or ingestion of food or object obstructing breathing. Source: Injury Facts, 2011 Ed. nsc.org
  42. 42. Emerging Best Practices • Organizational commitment, leadership support, and linking program to business objectives • Employee engagement – Employee input when developing goals and objectives – Incentives for employee participation, high participation levels • Effective implementation, planning and communications • Using evidence-based interventions • Appropriate targeting of at risk individuals with effective screening and triage • On-going evaluation of effectivenessnsc.org
  43. 43. Impact of Incentive-based Worksite Health Promotion Program on Modifiable Health Risk • Kathleen Poole, PhD; Karol Kumpfer, PhD; Marjorie Pett, DSW • Design: 4 yr study, July 1990 – January 1995. Data collected at baseline and annually. Examined modifiable risk factors including seat belt use, smoking status, blood pressure, cholesterol, body fat and physical activity. • Sample Size: 304 full-time employees participated 4 consecutive years, Attrition rates were 24.9%, 17.8%, 13.9% and 11.2% respectively. • Data: Clinical and Self-Reported HRAnsc.org
  44. 44. Impact of Incentive-based Worksite Health Promotion Program on Modifiable Health Risk • Intervention: – Annual 20 minute health assessment, monthly activity log. – Participants earned points to receive financial rebate. – Rebates ranged from $75 to max of $300, $102 average rebate. Percentage of employees receiving rebates grew – 66% year 1 to 84% year 4. • Results: – Modifiable risk factors improved over time. Self reported smoking behavior, physical activity, blood pressure and seat belt use improved significantly over time. – Slight increase in BMI and cholesterol from year 3 to year 4 attributed to change in timing of the data collection.nsc.org

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