Houston Facing the Future Smart Planning for  Inevitable Growth Stormwater and Water Quality
The Challenge <ul><li>Population Growth </li></ul><ul><li>Development/Redevelopment Pressures </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Locati...
Existing Challenges <ul><li>Structural Flooding </li></ul><ul><li>Backlog of Infrastructure Improvements </li></ul><ul><li...
Current Tools <ul><li>Design Standards and Land Use Restrictions </li></ul><ul><li>Permitting/Investigation/Enforcement </...
Constraints <ul><li>Laws, Ordinances and Regulations </li></ul><ul><li>Existing Infrastructure </li></ul><ul><li>Topograph...
Goal <ul><li>It is the desire of the  </li></ul><ul><li>City of Houston, the Bayou City,  </li></ul><ul><li>to improve the...
Benefits <ul><li>This goal has multiple benefits: </li></ul><ul><li>Assures the public that using our bayous and waterways...
City Efforts <ul><li>Capital Investment – Comprehensive Drainage Plan/ Regional Detention </li></ul><ul><li>MS4 Permit – S...
City Efforts <ul><li>Operations/Maintenance Practices </li></ul><ul><li>Revise Standards and Ordinances </li></ul><ul><li>...
Regional Detention <ul><li>Multi-use Basins provide: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduced Risk of Flooding  </li></ul></ul><ul><u...
Keith-Weiss Park <ul><li>A 500 acre park with 112 acres of detention ponds, hike and bike trails, fishing piers, bridges, ...
Green Building Resource Center  <ul><li>Free to the Public </li></ul><ul><li>Information on Green Building Strategies: </l...
Long Term Goals <ul><li>Challenge the “way we’ve always done it” mentality  </li></ul><ul><li>Engage the regulated communi...
Long Term Goals <ul><li>Search out opportunities for incentives – enforcement isn’t the only tool </li></ul><ul><li>Low Im...
<ul><li>No single entity can protect  </li></ul><ul><li>and heal our waterways –  </li></ul><ul><li>it takes the  </li></u...
Houston Facing the Future Increasing City Infrastructures While Reducing Environmental Impacts Infill Development Tools
The Problem <ul><li>The population is expected to grow by more than one million people by 2020. </li></ul><ul><li>In order...
Solutions <ul><li>INFILL DEVELOPMENT TOOLS </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Brownfields Redevelopment Program  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul...
Brownfields Redevelopment Program <ul><li>Improves the quality of life by promoting the beneficial redevelopment of eligib...
What are Brownfields <ul><li>Abandoned Buildings,  </li></ul><ul><li>Former Commercial Or Manufacturing Sites,  </li></ul>...
Success Stories   <ul><li>Since September 2005, 24 new sites have come into the Program. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>17 will bec...
Municipal Setting Designation (MSD) <ul><li>The Texas legislature authorized Municipal Setting Designations in 2003/Housto...
Why Prohibit Drinking  Water Use <ul><li>State regulations require contaminated groundwater to be cleaned up to the strict...
Success Stories <ul><li>Houston Pavilion, a downtown entertainment, retail, and office complex </li></ul><ul><li>Value Pla...
Redevelopment Authority <ul><li>These are local government corporations that get their powers from the Texas Transportatio...
TIRZ <ul><li>Special districts created by City Council to attract new investment to an area.  </li></ul><ul><li>Taxes attr...
Reasons for a TIRZ <ul><li>To address inner city infrastructure needs  </li></ul><ul><li>Unique neighborhoods needs </li><...
Eligible Project Costs <ul><li>capital costs (the acquisition and construction, and building rehabilitation costs);  </li>...
Land Assemblage  Redevelopment Authority <ul><li>LARA is a 13-member board appointed by the Mayor, City Council, Harris Co...
Houston Hope   <ul><li>Helps qualified low to moderate income homebuyers secure a mortgage loan from an Affordable Lending...
Infill Development Tools <ul><li>Help evaluate potential contaminated sites </li></ul><ul><li>Help cleanup and redevelopme...
 
 
 
 
 
Houston Facing the Future Increasing City Infrastructure While Reducing Environmental Impacts Electricity and Water
The Problem <ul><li>Houston’s population is expected to grow by more than one million people by 2020. </li></ul><ul><li>Ci...
Solutions <ul><li>Plan </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Start building infrastructure now for future needs </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Con...
Water and Electricity <ul><li>These two mainstays of modern life are interconnected. </li></ul><ul><li>Power is required t...
Water and Electricity <ul><li>Drinking Water and Wastewater operations consume nearly half of the power used by the City g...
<ul><li>Water is integral to the electric generation process. </li></ul><ul><li>One of the main uses of water in the power...
Electricity and Water <ul><li>Production of electrical power is one of the largest uses of water in Texas. </li></ul><ul><...
Water/ Wastewater Energy Usage
Water/ Wastewater Energy Usage  Waste Water ▬ 348 Million kWh  In 2007 Drinking Water ▬   241 Million kWh In 2007
Drinking Water Operations <ul><li>Optimizing water levels in clear wells to increase pump efficiency. </li></ul><ul><li>Us...
More Examples <ul><li>Providing drinking water from surface water uses 1/3 less electricity than from groundwater. </li></...
Wastewater Operations Group <ul><li>Aggressively looks for opportunities to reduce electrical energy consumption. </li></u...
Examples <ul><li>Participate in the “Energy Share Load Management Program” offered by CenterPoint Energy  </li></ul><ul><l...
More Examples <ul><li>A Combined Heat & Power (CHP) system is in the design stage for the Almeda Sims sludge drying facili...
Examples from the City <ul><li>The City will use the Clinton Climate Initiative’s Energy Efficiency Building Retrofit Prog...
More  <ul><li>Replace traffic signals with LED lights to save electricity.  </li></ul><ul><li>Initiated a weatherization p...
Other Methods <ul><li>Commercial Energy Conservation Code </li></ul><ul><ul><li>New code took effect August 1, 2008  </li>...
Energy Conservation <ul><li>Reducing electrical usage in throughout water and wastewater systems. </li></ul><ul><li>Using ...
<ul><li>Questions? </li></ul>
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City Panel Handout

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City Panel Smart Planning Gulf Coast Green 2009, Houston, Texas

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  • City Panel Handout

    1. 1. Houston Facing the Future Smart Planning for Inevitable Growth Stormwater and Water Quality
    2. 2. The Challenge <ul><li>Population Growth </li></ul><ul><li>Development/Redevelopment Pressures </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Location </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Impervious Cover </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Drainage Infrastructure </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Changing Regulations </li></ul>
    3. 3. Existing Challenges <ul><li>Structural Flooding </li></ul><ul><li>Backlog of Infrastructure Improvements </li></ul><ul><li>Impaired Waterways </li></ul><ul><li>Non-regulated discharges </li></ul><ul><li>Enforcement staffing </li></ul>
    4. 4. Current Tools <ul><li>Design Standards and Land Use Restrictions </li></ul><ul><li>Permitting/Investigation/Enforcement </li></ul><ul><li>Infrastructure Investment </li></ul><ul><li>Operations/Maintenance Practices </li></ul><ul><li>Reporting and Education </li></ul>
    5. 5. Constraints <ul><li>Laws, Ordinances and Regulations </li></ul><ul><li>Existing Infrastructure </li></ul><ul><li>Topography </li></ul><ul><li>Available Funding </li></ul>
    6. 6. Goal <ul><li>It is the desire of the </li></ul><ul><li>City of Houston, the Bayou City, </li></ul><ul><li>to improve the quality of our waterways, at a minimum , </li></ul><ul><li>to meet the State of Texas </li></ul><ul><li>Water Quality standards . </li></ul>
    7. 7. Benefits <ul><li>This goal has multiple benefits: </li></ul><ul><li>Assures the public that using our bayous and waterways for recreation is “safe” </li></ul><ul><li>Enhances the environment and habitat for wildlife including the nation’s largest migratory flyway </li></ul><ul><li>Reduces the costs of the water purification process </li></ul><ul><li>Improves aesthetics and overall quality of life experience of residents and visitors </li></ul>
    8. 8. City Efforts <ul><li>Capital Investment – Comprehensive Drainage Plan/ Regional Detention </li></ul><ul><li>MS4 Permit – Storm Water Management Program </li></ul><ul><li>Total Maximum Daily Load Activities </li></ul>
    9. 9. City Efforts <ul><li>Operations/Maintenance Practices </li></ul><ul><li>Revise Standards and Ordinances </li></ul><ul><li>Public Education </li></ul><ul><li>Green Building Resource Center </li></ul>
    10. 10. Regional Detention <ul><li>Multi-use Basins provide: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduced Risk of Flooding </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Efficiency </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Opportunities for multiple partners </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Open Space and Parks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Water Quality Benefits </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ecosystem Benefits </li></ul></ul>
    11. 11. Keith-Weiss Park <ul><li>A 500 acre park with 112 acres of detention ponds, hike and bike trails, fishing piers, bridges, and wildlife and bird watching opportunities. </li></ul>
    12. 12. Green Building Resource Center <ul><li>Free to the Public </li></ul><ul><li>Information on Green Building Strategies: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduced energy consumption </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Water reuse and conservation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Healthier living and work spaces </li></ul></ul>
    13. 13. Long Term Goals <ul><li>Challenge the “way we’ve always done it” mentality </li></ul><ul><li>Engage the regulated community (developers, builders, residents, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Address both Quantity and Quality </li></ul>
    14. 14. Long Term Goals <ul><li>Search out opportunities for incentives – enforcement isn’t the only tool </li></ul><ul><li>Low Impact Development techniques can have significant water quality benefits </li></ul><ul><li>Be willing to try or allow implementation of new concepts and applications </li></ul>
    15. 15. <ul><li>No single entity can protect </li></ul><ul><li>and heal our waterways – </li></ul><ul><li>it takes the </li></ul><ul><li>entire community </li></ul>
    16. 16. Houston Facing the Future Increasing City Infrastructures While Reducing Environmental Impacts Infill Development Tools
    17. 17. The Problem <ul><li>The population is expected to grow by more than one million people by 2020. </li></ul><ul><li>In order to have a sustainable city structure, the city needs to develop or re-develop under-utilized properties. </li></ul>
    18. 18. Solutions <ul><li>INFILL DEVELOPMENT TOOLS </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Brownfields Redevelopment Program </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Municipal Setting Designation (MSD) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tax Increment Redevelopment Zones (TIRZs) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Land Assemblage Redevelopment Authority (LARA) and Houston Hope </li></ul></ul>
    19. 19. Brownfields Redevelopment Program <ul><li>Improves the quality of life by promoting the beneficial redevelopment of eligible property that have been hindered by the presence of environmental contamination. </li></ul><ul><li>Often supported by Federal Programs. </li></ul><ul><li>The program can help eligible sites: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify potential environmental issues </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Assess the extent of the issue </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cleanup or remove the issue (limited cases) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Redevelop the Brownfield in a beneficial manner </li></ul></ul>
    20. 20. What are Brownfields <ul><li>Abandoned Buildings, </li></ul><ul><li>Former Commercial Or Manufacturing Sites, </li></ul><ul><li>Vacant Lots, Or </li></ul><ul><li>Other Types Of Property </li></ul><ul><li>Who is Eligible </li></ul><ul><li>Properties that will be redevelopment in a manner that will benefit the community, such as: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Housing For The Elderly Or Disadvantaged </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>New Businesses That Create Jobs Or Shopping Opportunities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Parks </li></ul></ul>
    21. 21. Success Stories <ul><li>Since September 2005, 24 new sites have come into the Program. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>17 will become park space, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2 will provide affordable housing, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1 will provide housing for the elderly, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1 will become an educational organic garden, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1 will become a hotel/resort, and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2 are City-owned properties that will be cleaned up and sold for development. </li></ul></ul>
    22. 22. Municipal Setting Designation (MSD) <ul><li>The Texas legislature authorized Municipal Setting Designations in 2003/Houston City Council passed enabling legislation in 2006. </li></ul><ul><li>An MSD specifies that the contaminated groundwater under an individual parcel, is prohibited from use as drinking water. </li></ul><ul><li>Why Support a MSD </li></ul><ul><li>It protects the public from drinking the contaminated groundwater </li></ul><ul><li>It encourages cleanup of contaminated sites through participation in a State or Federal program </li></ul><ul><li>It promotes redevelopment of under-utilized properties </li></ul>
    23. 23. Why Prohibit Drinking Water Use <ul><li>State regulations require contaminated groundwater to be cleaned up to the strict levels that allow future drinking water use. </li></ul><ul><li>However, if no one is using the groundwater, and another source of drinking water is available, the MSD statute allows alternative cleanup levels. </li></ul><ul><li>What must the site do </li></ul><ul><li>Participate in a state or federal clean-up program </li></ul><ul><li>Request City support of MSD application </li></ul><ul><li>If City supports, site submit application to TCEQ </li></ul><ul><li>TCEQ grants or denies MSD </li></ul><ul><li>If MSD granted by TCEQ, City files restriction on property deed </li></ul>
    24. 24. Success Stories <ul><li>Houston Pavilion, a downtown entertainment, retail, and office complex </li></ul><ul><li>Value Place, an extended stay hotel chain opened on Sam Houston Parkway </li></ul>
    25. 25. Redevelopment Authority <ul><li>These are local government corporations that get their powers from the Texas Transportation Code CH. 431; </li></ul><ul><li>They have the power to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>issue bonds and notes; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>hire consultants (legal, financial, engineering); and, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>work with developers to further the TIRZ's goals and objectives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Current TIRZs </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Currently, the City has twenty-two TIRZs, </li></ul><ul><li>15 were city-initiated </li></ul><ul><li>7 initiated through the petition process </li></ul>
    26. 26. TIRZ <ul><li>Special districts created by City Council to attract new investment to an area. </li></ul><ul><li>Taxes attributable to new improvements (tax increment) are set-aside in a fund to finance public improvements in that zone. </li></ul>
    27. 27. Reasons for a TIRZ <ul><li>To address inner city infrastructure needs </li></ul><ul><li>Unique neighborhoods needs </li></ul><ul><li>To fully engage local community in a planning process </li></ul><ul><li>How they work </li></ul><ul><li>New construction in a zone produces an incremental increase in tax revenue above the base amount. </li></ul><ul><li>The incremental tax revenue is returned to the zone for projects associated with public improvements of the zone for the duration of the zone. </li></ul>
    28. 28. Eligible Project Costs <ul><li>capital costs (the acquisition and construction, and building rehabilitation costs); </li></ul><ul><li>financing costs (including all interest); </li></ul><ul><li>real property assembly; </li></ul><ul><li>relocation costs; </li></ul><ul><li>professional services; and, </li></ul><ul><li>creation, organization and administrative costs </li></ul><ul><li>TIRZ Powers </li></ul><ul><li>land use controls; </li></ul><ul><li>design standards (in special cases); </li></ul><ul><li>recommendations for the administration of the zone; and, </li></ul><ul><li>powers to implement a project and financing plan </li></ul>
    29. 29. Land Assemblage Redevelopment Authority <ul><li>LARA is a 13-member board appointed by the Mayor, City Council, Harris County and the Houston Independent School District. </li></ul><ul><li>LARA acquires tax delinquent properties and then develops them as truly affordable homes. </li></ul><ul><li>Foreclosed lots in designated neighborhoods are made available to participating builders through LARA. </li></ul><ul><li>The builders work with Houston Hope or Homebuyer Assistance Program (HAP) to build affordable housing </li></ul>
    30. 30. Houston Hope <ul><li>Helps qualified low to moderate income homebuyers secure a mortgage loan from an Affordable Lending Partner </li></ul><ul><li>Help with Down-Payment Assistance up to $37,500. </li></ul><ul><li>Success Stories </li></ul><ul><li>Houston HOPE has helped hundreds of families to own quality affordable homes in re-energized areas of the city </li></ul><ul><li>And closed 130 homes in 2008 and provided $3.2 millions in down payment assistance </li></ul>
    31. 31. Infill Development Tools <ul><li>Help evaluate potential contaminated sites </li></ul><ul><li>Help cleanup and redevelopment of contaminated sites </li></ul><ul><li>Help improve infrastructure by keeping new tax revenues in its zone </li></ul><ul><li>Help redevelop historic neighborhoods by replacing tax delinquent and not repairable properties with new construction </li></ul><ul><li>Help new qualified homebuyers purchase homes </li></ul>
    32. 37. Houston Facing the Future Increasing City Infrastructure While Reducing Environmental Impacts Electricity and Water
    33. 38. The Problem <ul><li>Houston’s population is expected to grow by more than one million people by 2020. </li></ul><ul><li>City infrastructure needs to grow with the population. </li></ul><ul><li>We need to continue to reduce environmental impacts while facilitating growth. </li></ul>
    34. 39. Solutions <ul><li>Plan </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Start building infrastructure now for future needs </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Conserve </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Maintain and optimize existing resources </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Repair </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify and fix problems </li></ul></ul>
    35. 40. Water and Electricity <ul><li>These two mainstays of modern life are interconnected. </li></ul><ul><li>Power is required to produce high-quality drinking water and to provide it to customers throughout Houston. </li></ul><ul><li>Power is required to collect and treat wastewater from customers across the city. </li></ul>
    36. 41. Water and Electricity <ul><li>Drinking Water and Wastewater operations consume nearly half of the power used by the City government. </li></ul><ul><li>Energy costs account for approximately 20% of typical water/wastewater operating costs, and nearly 10% of the total bill. </li></ul>
    37. 42. <ul><li>Water is integral to the electric generation process. </li></ul><ul><li>One of the main uses of water in the power industry is to cool the power-producing equipment. </li></ul><ul><li>This water cools the equipment, but gets too hot to be released back into the environment. </li></ul><ul><li>The hot cooling-water is cooled in very large cooling towers and evaporation occurs and water is lost. </li></ul>Electricity and Water
    38. 43. Electricity and Water <ul><li>Production of electrical power is one of the largest uses of water in Texas. </li></ul><ul><li>Texas power plants withdraw over 13,000 million gallons per day*. </li></ul><ul><li>That’s the volume of Lake Houston every 4 days. </li></ul>* USGS
    39. 44. Water/ Wastewater Energy Usage
    40. 45. Water/ Wastewater Energy Usage Waste Water ▬ 348 Million kWh In 2007 Drinking Water ▬ 241 Million kWh In 2007
    41. 46. Drinking Water Operations <ul><li>Optimizing water levels in clear wells to increase pump efficiency. </li></ul><ul><li>Use less water to make water – more efficient backwash of filters and sludge thickeners saves power, water, and chemicals. </li></ul><ul><li>Use solar powered circulators in Lake Houston. </li></ul>
    42. 47. More Examples <ul><li>Providing drinking water from surface water uses 1/3 less electricity than from groundwater. </li></ul><ul><li>Decommissioning inefficient and redundant groundwater plants also saves electricity. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>19 groundwater treatment plants and 27 wells have been decommissioned. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>25 groundwater treatment plants and 43 wells are scheduled for decommissioning over the next five years. </li></ul></ul>
    43. 48. Wastewater Operations Group <ul><li>Aggressively looks for opportunities to reduce electrical energy consumption. </li></ul><ul><li>It is a standard practice to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>replace regular motors with high efficiency motors for pumps, blowers, and mixers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>replace/retrofit old-type aeration systems with high efficiency systems </li></ul></ul>
    44. 49. Examples <ul><li>Participate in the “Energy Share Load Management Program” offered by CenterPoint Energy </li></ul><ul><li>Replace motors on 24 Recycle Activated Sludge pumps and 4 influent lift station pumps with Variable Frequency Drives. </li></ul><ul><li>Upgrade 64 conventional aeration mixers with high efficiency mixers and motors. </li></ul><ul><li>A new, high efficiency, fine bubble aeration system will be installed at the Southwest WWTP </li></ul>
    45. 50. More Examples <ul><li>A Combined Heat & Power (CHP) system is in the design stage for the Almeda Sims sludge drying facility. </li></ul><ul><li>CHP is being considered for the 69th Street Wastewater Treatment Plant (the City’s largest plant). </li></ul><ul><li>The city is participating in the Clinton Foundation Project which is evaluating all Wastewater Treatment Plants in the city for energy savings. </li></ul>
    46. 51. Examples from the City <ul><li>The City will use the Clinton Climate Initiative’s Energy Efficiency Building Retrofit Program on 271 facilities, which will save more than 20 percent in utility and operating costs annually. </li></ul><ul><li>Install a 100-kilowatt solar energy system on the roof of the downtown George R. Brown Convention Center. A pilot program will install about half of the system in 2009. </li></ul>
    47. 52. More <ul><li>Replace traffic signals with LED lights to save electricity. </li></ul><ul><li>Initiated a weatherization program as part of our neighborhood revitalization campaign. This program will improve the energy efficiency of homes in inner city neighborhoods. </li></ul>
    48. 53. Other Methods <ul><li>Commercial Energy Conservation Code </li></ul><ul><ul><li>New code took effect August 1, 2008 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Minimum requirements for the energy-efficient design of all buildings except low-rise residential buildings. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>More Stringent than the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) </li></ul></ul>
    49. 54. Energy Conservation <ul><li>Reducing electrical usage in throughout water and wastewater systems. </li></ul><ul><li>Using solar power for George R. Brown and Lake Houston circulators. </li></ul><ul><li>Replace traffic lights with LED lights. </li></ul><ul><li>Helping neighborhoods weatherize their homes. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop stringent energy conservation codes. </li></ul>
    50. 55. <ul><li>Questions? </li></ul>

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