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mind map

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A mind map is a diagram used to visually organize information. A mind map is often created around a single concept, drawn as an image in the center of a blank landscape page, to which associated representations of ideas such as images, words and parts of words are added.

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mind map

  1. 1. • A mind map is a diagram used to visually organize information. A mind map is often created around a single concept, drawn as an image in the center of a blank landscape page, to which associated representations of ideas such as images, words and parts of words are added.
  2. 2. • Mind Maps are a unique thinking tool that will bring out your natural genius and enable you to shine in every area of your life.
  3. 3. 1. Come up with innovative ideas and creative solutions? 2. Memorize information and recall it under pressure? 3. Set goals and achieve them? 4. Change career or start up your own venture? 5. Be an excellent time manager? 6. Run meetings with efficiency and ease? 7. Budget and plan to perfection? 8. Deliver excellent presentations with confidence? 9. Have more time for yourself and your family? 10.Enjoy success after success in your life?
  4. 4. Origins • The term "mind map" was first popularized by British popular psychology author and television personality Tony Buzan. • The use of diagrams that visually "map" information using branching and radial maps traces back centuries. These pictorial methods record knowledge and model systems, and have a long history in learning, brainstorming, memory, visual thinking, and problem solving by educators, engineers, psychologists, and others.
  5. 5. Historical Examples • Some of the earliest examples of such graphical records were developed by Porphyry of Tyros, a noted thinker of the 3rd century, as he graphically visualized the concept categories of Aristotle. Philosopher Ramon Llull (1235–1315) also used such techniques. • The semantic network was developed in the late 1950s as a theory to understand human learning and developed further by Allan M. Collins and M. Ross Quillian during the early 1960s.
  6. 6. The process for creating a mind map can be described in eight steps:
  7. 7. Step.1 : Centre first • Mind mapping begins with a word or image that symbolizes what you want to think about placed in the middle of the page. Centre first
  8. 8. Step.2 : Lighten up • Start with an open, creative attitude. Let go of the idea of solving the entire problem, or writing a report that everyone will love. This is simply a brain dumping process that helps stimulate new ideas and connections. Centre first Lighten up
  9. 9. Step.3 : Free Associate • Put down all ideas without judgement or evaluation. As ideas emerge, write one or two word descriptions of ideas on lines branching from the central focus. Allow the ideas to expand outward into branches and sub-branches. Centre first Lighten up Add branches
  10. 10. Step.4 : Think fast • Your brain works best in five to seven minute bursts, so capture the ideas as rapidly as possible. Keywords, symbols and images provide a mental shorthand for recording ideas as quickly as possible. Centre first Lighten up Add branches Capture explosionof ideas Think fast
  11. 11. Step.5 : Break boundaries • The bigger the paper, the more ideas you'll have. Use different colors and styles. Break boundaries
  12. 12. Step.6 : Don’t judge • Put everything down that comes to mind even if it is completely unrelated. If you're brainstorming ideas for a report on the status of carrots in Texas and you suddenly remember you need to pick-up your cleaning, put down "cleaning." • Otherwise your mind will get stuck like a record in that "cleaning" groove and you'll never generate those great ideas.
  13. 13. Don’t judge Don’t judge Evenunrelated
  14. 14. Step.7 : Keep moving • Keep your hand moving. If ideas slow down, draw empty lines, and watch your brain automatically find ideas to put on them. Centre first Think fast Don’t judge Free associate Lighten up Add branches Break boundaries Keep moving
  15. 15. Step.8 : Allow organization • Sometimes, you see relationships and connections immediately and you can add sub-branches to a main idea. Sometimes you don't, so you just connect the ideas to the central focus. Organization can always come later; the first requirement is to get the ideas out of your head and onto the paper. Centre first Think fast Don’t judge Free associate Lighten up Add branches Break boundaries Keep moving Allow Organization
  16. 16. Benefits  The main benefits of using Mind Maps are the following: 1. The process of creating a mind maps is more interesting and entertaining than a standard chart or table. 2. Their visual quality permits users to highlight and review key points easily and more quickly than with standard sets of notes. 3. They facilitate recall, because the association of ideas, mirrors the way the brain works. 4. They help groups make sense out of things and help establish priorities.
  17. 17. Mind Mapping VS. Concept Mapping • Concept maps - Mind maps differ from concept maps in that : • Mind maps focus on only one word or idea, whereas concept maps connect multiple words or ideas. • Also, concept maps typically have text labels on their connecting lines/arms. Mind maps are based on tree structures denoting relationships with a central governing concept, whereas concept maps are based on connections between concepts in more diverse patterns.
  18. 18. Mind maps & Nursing process • The nursing process is a modified scientific method. Nursing practice was first described as a four stage nursing process by Ida Jean Orlando in 1958. • Some authors refer to a mind map as a potential alternative strategy for organizing care. • Intuition plays a part for experienced nurses. • Phases 1 Assessing phase 2 Diagnosing phase 3 Planning phase 4 Implementing phase 5 Evaluating phase
  19. 19. Nursing process : Mind & Concept Mapping A concept map or conceptual diagram is a diagram that depicts suggested relationships between concepts A concept map typically represents ideas and information as boxes or circles, which it connects with labeled arrows. The relationship between concepts can be articulated in linking phrases such as causes, requires, or contributes to. 1. Concept mapping helps nurses organize thoughts and methods. 2. Improve memory and comprehension with concept mapping. 3. Concept mapping for nursing enhances decision making. 4. Use concept mapping software to Develop reports ( electronic health records). 5. Assessing Patient Needs. 6. Finding Relationships Between Symptoms. 7. Revealing Diagnosis. 8. Care Plans.
  20. 20. Thank you

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