Successfully reported this slideshow.
Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Stacy Shaw & Janine Robinson

Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Loading in …3
×

Check these out next

1 of 36 Ad

More Related Content

Slideshows for you (20)

Viewers also liked (19)

Advertisement

Similar to Stacy Shaw & Janine Robinson (20)

Advertisement

Recently uploaded (20)

Stacy Shaw & Janine Robinson

  1. 1. Creating a Business Case for Responsible Training Stacy Shaw Director of Corporate Social Responsibility Oregon Lottery Janine Robinson M.Ed, CPGC, RP, Responsible Gambling Innovation, Training Research and Development
  2. 2. Janine Robinson Oregon State Lottery Stacy Shaw M.ED, CPGC, RP
  3. 3. 3
  4. 4. 4 Today we will discuss: • Creating a clear and compelling business case for responsible gambling training • Using a customer service positioning • Strategies for 360˚stakeholder engagement • Overcoming challenges associated with delivering training
  5. 5. 5 Agenda • About the Oregon Lottery • A Case Study: Responsible Gambling & You • Video Lottery Retailer Training • Lottery Employee Training
  6. 6. 6
  7. 7. 7 A Case Study: Responsible Gambling & You: Video Lottery Retailer Training
  8. 8. 8 Video Lottery Retailer Training: Answering Questions • Why start with retailers instead of employees? • What do we hope to accomplish? • What do we envision? • How do we get started?
  9. 9. 9 Video Lottery Retailer Training: Answering Questions Why start with retailers instead of employees? • 2400+ retailers • 10,000+ retail employees • And retailers believe:
  10. 10. 10 Video Lottery Retailer Training: Answering Questions What do we hope to accomplish?
  11. 11. 11 Video Lottery Retailer Training: Answering Questions What do we envision?
  12. 12. 12 Video Lottery Retailer Training: Answering Questions How do we get started?
  13. 13. 13 Video Lottery Retailer Training: Setting the Stage
  14. 14. 14 Video Lottery Retailer Training: Setting the Stage • Gain commitment from influencers • Demonstrate top down support • Reflect in contract
  15. 15. 15 Video Lottery Retailer Training: Building the Case • Resolving retailer ambivalence • Demystifying RG training • Emphasizing customer service skills • Good Corporate Citizenship
  16. 16. 16 Video Lottery Retailer Training: Building the Case Responsible Gambling is for All Players, All the Time
  17. 17. 17 Video Lottery Retailer Training: Building the Case • Can lead to a negative perception of gambling venues • Recreational players – the core player base – can have bad experiences if they are interacting with people who have gambling problems. • People with gambling problems are not viable long-term customers Problem Gambling is BAD for business
  18. 18. 18 Video Lottery Retailer Training: Building the Case • Leverages customer service skills to provide a better gaming experience • Helps clarify staff roles by providing tools to handle common situations • Supports employee morale and higher job satisfaction • Supports a sustainable player base who enjoy gambling as a recreational activity • It’s part of a shared commitment with the Lottery ( and it’s required) Why Responsible Gambling Training is GOOD for business
  19. 19. 19 Video Lottery Retailer Training: Building the Program Providing Accurate Information • The most common staff encounters • Customer service solutions • Simple, honest clarity about the games
  20. 20. 20 Video Lottery Retailer Training: Building the Program • Directly addressing concerns • Emphasizing joint responsibility • Debunking myths about RG Understanding Roles
  21. 21. 21 Video Lottery Retailer Training: Building the Program Responding to opportunities to provide information on resources for help • Emphasizing player autonomy • Respectful offers of information • Destigmatizing response
  22. 22. 22 Video Lottery Retailer Training: The Pilot Launching and Learning • Committed to training all employees within 2 weeks • Joint PR campaign • Commission presentation • Additional 200 locations of the Retailer Advisory panel
  23. 23. 23 Video Lottery Retailer Training: The Pilot Launching and Learning • Considered training beneficial and a success • Agreed to participate in post training research • Identified group trainings as an alternative method • Identified need for a condensed print version • Committed to including in new employee onboarding
  24. 24. 24 • Make Field Sales staff responsible for “selling” RG training • Train them to sell it, incorporate special curriculum into existing professional selling skills program • Creating an elevator speech • Overcoming objections • Over 50 objections identified and answers provided • Both objections around the training itself and logistical objections • Scenario based learning Video Lottery Retailer Training: The Rollout Training and Selling
  25. 25. 25 Video Lottery Retailer Training: The Rollout Training and Selling • Utilize sales contact management system and dashboard • Create multiple touch points for sales staff to engage with retailers on the training • Kit: Letter from Director, “appointment” cards for the training, gift • Include training in retailers quarterly business review • Deliver completion certificates • Compliance visit (last resort)
  26. 26. 26 Video Lottery Retailer Training: Pilot Impacts
  27. 27. 27 Video Lottery Retailer Training: Pilot Impacts • Research • Post training research with pilot retailers in progress • Incorporate into retailer engagement surveys • Additional Training • 3 additional language versions for video retailers (print) • Training specific for traditional only retailers • Partnering with Oregon Liquor Control Commission to include Responsible Gambling training with server training
  28. 28. 28 A Case Study: Lottery Employee Training
  29. 29. 29 Lottery Employee Training: Answering Questions • What do we hope to accomplish? • What do we envision? • How do we get started?
  30. 30. 30 Lottery Employee Training: Building a program for all Lottery employees
  31. 31. 31 Lottery Employee Training: Building a program for all Lottery employees
  32. 32. 32 Lottery Employee Training: Building a program for all Lottery employees
  33. 33. 33 Lottery Employee Training: Impacts • 100% of employees trained • Post training research in progress • In person training for player and retailer facing employees • Incorporated into onboarding • Annual certification
  34. 34. 34 In Conclusion “I have presented a lot of the RG training lately and have been very surprise by the very positive feedback from the retailers. In most cases it grabs their attention to the point we can have a good discussion on all of our responsibilities for RG.” “Staff can have a conversation with a player and feel like they have helped. We recognize the importance of this training and include it along with required server training for all new employees. We encourage every retailer to support this Responsible Gambling initiative – it’s not just the right thing to do, it’s good for business” “Providing this training to customer service staff is an important step in promoting awareness of problem gambling and the importance of responsible gambling. The Lottery has worked closely with its council partners on this project and we congratulate the Lottery and its retailers for bringing this important information to retailer staff.” – Kelly Sheldon Operations Officer Dotty’s – Aaron Ostrom Lottery Field Service Representative – Tom Moore Oregon Council on Problem Gambling Executive Director
  35. 35. 35 Questions?
  36. 36. THANK YOU

Editor's Notes

  • S
  • S
  • S
  • S
  • S
  • S
  • S; Increase knowledge base of our retailers which was really low , go from one person trained to multiple people trained, leverage customer service skills create better customer experiences
  • S
  • S& JWe talked to a lot of people and then engaged Janine
  • S & J Conducting focus groups with all these groups to understand objectives, objections and current knowledge levels.
    -why not simply “white label” a training? Because Oregon, like every jurisdiction, has distinct needs and idiosyncrasies and is at a specific location in its RG culture-building. A white label training does not address specific needs of specific jurisdictions
  • S - Notes for contract Responsible Gambling: Lottery recognizes and promotes a shared responsibility for the promotion of responsible gambling
    Best Practices: Retailer agrees to make a good faith attempt to make players aware of the passage of time
  • J - “ This training is not about counseling or intervention, but focuses instead on techniques for having conversations about how Lottery games really work and the resources available for people with gambling issues. Simply put, it leverages the great customer service skills that our retailers already have”
  • J “ This training is not about counseling or intervention, but focuses instead on techniques for having conversations about how Lottery games really work and the resources available for people with gambling issues. Simply put, it leverages the great customer service skills that our retailers already have”
  • J In an era of corporate social responsibility, NOT having a robust RG program can be damaging to the industry in multiple ways, not the least of which are:
  • J -resolves retailer concerns that this is an “added” item for their staff: it actually can help make the work easier. Refer to Quilty, Robinson research on job satisfaction
    -Helps employees provide accurate game information to players: an informed customer base can make decisions about their gambling within their OWN limits
    -can provide information to players about resources, help and change options. Employees sleep better at night if they feel they can help someone when needed.
  • J These are common myths you may hear. The curriculum is designed to be relevant to staff, using example gleaned from focus groups. The responses are, as you will hear, honest and direct, while also being friendly and customer-service oriented.
    -It is unusual to hear “the games take in more than they pay out”, or simple, accurate information about the stop buttons. We are proud of this: and Lottery is still profitable and serving the public!!
  • J
  • J - Janine: emphasis on not “having to quit” and non-”treatment” language. Recount some of our discussions, Stacy and Janine, about wanting to ensure people seek services and how Janine kept insisting that treatment and abstinence language prevents people from seeking help. AND, you have to be VERY even handed in how you transmit this information. We provided honest information earlier (vlt’s always take in more than they pay out, for example) and are trying to be as credible as possible throughout
    Offering materials: review the concepts reinforced in this video
    -destigmatizing the conversation
    -using customer service
    -normalizing the customer’s situation etc
  • S
  • s
  • Janine to talk about developing the course and training the trainers
    Stacy talk about the FSR role in selling
  • S
  • 100% participation, we promoted with posters and email around the building, leveraged retailer training
  • J Providing Good information: supporting retailers and the public to understand how the games work, and why providing good information is an important part of RG
    -challenges of employees in different roles, customer/non-customer facing, for example
    -based on empirical evidence, tailored via focus groups
  • -note the ways in which the messaging addresses the subtle but distinct concerns employees have about their role in RG compared to retailers
    -these were compiled via focus groups information
    -there is additional content in the training that reinforces “ALL” lottery employees, and “ALL players”
  • Offering materials: review the concepts reinforced in this video
    Janine: speak to the value of having something that all employees could relate to: a situation where they were ambassadors or spokespersons, or villainized, by someone in public for being an employee selling gambling products
    Stacy: speak to video production, any internal discussions perhaps that illustrate the value of this example to Lottery staff? How do people respond to it? etc
  • -practice evidence is compelling, and usually predates empirical evidence. So, while we wait for the data to roll in, …..
  • ROOM MONITOR: Please make your way back upstairs for lunch.

×