Library-faculty collaboration : its obstacles and how to get around them Information literacy and its role in learning pro...
Contents <ul><li>Examples of exiting collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Results of the Yhtämatkaa (“Working Tandem”) study </...
Examples of existing collaboration <ul><li>Teacher invites information specialist (or IS invites herself) to talk to stude...
Traditional roles are getting blurred: Librarian teaches Teacher seeks and disseminates information
Results of the  Yhtämatkaa (Working Tandem) Study <ul><li>Teaching staff interviewed in three polytechnics/universities of...
Results of the  Yhtämatkaa (Working Tandem) Study <ul><li>It does not always come to mind:  ”you really should be there mo...
Why collaborate? <ul><li>To enhance learning and improve its quality </li></ul><ul><li>To share educational objectives > c...
<ul><li>Information literacy objectives should be part of syllabus and integrated to all teaching, not just as a separate ...
Obstacles of collaboration <ul><li>Attitude </li></ul><ul><li>Time </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of understanding of each other’s...
Getting around obstacles: What can teaching staff do? <ul><li>Learn to use the library and its entire collection </li></ul...
Getting around obstacles: What can library do? <ul><li>Stop thinking US vs. THEM </li></ul><ul><li>Meet with teachers, bui...
Success requires.. <ul><li>Time  </li></ul><ul><li>Communication  </li></ul><ul><li>Caring  </li></ul><ul><li>Presence  </...
Bibliography <ul><li>AMKIT Pedagogiikkaryhmä.  Yhtämatkaa: Informaatiolukutaito haastaa opettajat ja informaatikot yhteist...
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Obstacles of collaboration

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On the obstacles of lirary-faculty collaboration, presented at the Kajaani seminar on IL and its role in learning process, 6.-7.2.2007

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Obstacles of collaboration

  1. 1. Library-faculty collaboration : its obstacles and how to get around them Information literacy and its role in learning process, Kajaani, Finland 6.-7.2.2007 Hanna-Riina Aho Central Ostrobothnia University of Applied Sciences [email_address] Päivi Hollanti Finnish Virtual Polytechnic [email_address]
  2. 2. Contents <ul><li>Examples of exiting collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Results of the Yhtämatkaa (“Working Tandem”) study </li></ul><ul><li>Why collaborate? </li></ul><ul><li>What kind of collaboration is needed? </li></ul><ul><li>Obstacles of collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Getting around obstacles: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What can teaching staff do? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What can library do? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Success requires.. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Examples of existing collaboration <ul><li>Teacher invites information specialist (or IS invites herself) to talk to students about information acquisition </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher informs library beforehand about the written assignment topics. </li></ul><ul><li>Library offers links to field-specific information sources, sometimes even to the sources of a particular assignment. </li></ul><ul><li>Link to information sources, library etc. as part of online course </li></ul><ul><li>Information acquisition, information literacy part of syllabus </li></ul><ul><li>etc. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Traditional roles are getting blurred: Librarian teaches Teacher seeks and disseminates information
  5. 5. Results of the Yhtämatkaa (Working Tandem) Study <ul><li>Teaching staff interviewed in three polytechnics/universities of applied sciences (SAMK, TAMK, KPAMK) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>views on information literacy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>thoughts on possible library/faculty collaboration </li></ul></ul><ul><li>” It [IL] is a central skill in professional learning and development..” </li></ul><ul><li>Teaching staff want to collaborate, but biggest obstacles are lack of time and limited resources </li></ul><ul><li>” Our students are incredibly poor at finding information.” </li></ul>
  6. 6. Results of the Yhtämatkaa (Working Tandem) Study <ul><li>It does not always come to mind: ”you really should be there more often, planning” - Library collaboration is often missed in syllabus work or the planning of study modules. </li></ul><ul><li>” They are like little chicks waiting with their beaks open for the teacher to provide them with a worm.” Experiencing or sharing? </li></ul><ul><li>Teaching staff have excellent skills on referencing and citing, but all need guidance on good quality internet sources. </li></ul><ul><li>The work of the library and information specialist is not necessarily very familiar. </li></ul>© Digital Vision
  7. 7. Why collaborate? <ul><li>To enhance learning and improve its quality </li></ul><ul><li>To share educational objectives > common goal! </li></ul><ul><li>To provide students with good information management practices </li></ul><ul><li>To enhance understanding between the professions </li></ul><ul><li>To facilitate own work </li></ul><ul><li>To develop own skills and knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>To ensure appropriate use of library funds </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration is a path to critical thinking! </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Information literacy objectives should be part of syllabus and integrated to all teaching, not just as a separate course provided by library alone.  Every teacher is an information specialist! </li></ul>What kind of collaboration is needed? <ul><li>TEACHER </li></ul><ul><li>Course objectives </li></ul><ul><li>Information sources </li></ul><ul><li>Learning evaluation (essential to learning!) </li></ul><ul><li>LIBRARY </li></ul><ul><li>IL objectives </li></ul><ul><li>Information sources </li></ul><ul><li>Information acquisition </li></ul>
  9. 9. Obstacles of collaboration <ul><li>Attitude </li></ul><ul><li>Time </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of understanding of each other’s competencies </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of understanding of each other’s needs </li></ul><ul><li>Misconception that IL is something one adapts without having to be taught - ”that’s how we did it” </li></ul><ul><li>Strong belief on motivation as deciding factor (pearls to pigs?) </li></ul><ul><li>Professional conventions and cultures </li></ul><ul><li>Conventions and culture of polytechnic and its institutes </li></ul><ul><li>Culture of coping alone: Help is neither needed nor asked! </li></ul>
  10. 10. Getting around obstacles: What can teaching staff do? <ul><li>Learn to use the library and its entire collection </li></ul><ul><li>Show students the importance of information as part of professional expertise </li></ul><ul><li>Recognise his/her own information needs </li></ul><ul><li>Be curious </li></ul><ul><li>Voice his/her needs and wishes to library </li></ul><ul><li>Answer the questions asked by library </li></ul><ul><li>Meet with librarians and communicate professionally </li></ul><ul><li>Recognise his/her own responsibility in the teaching of information literacy </li></ul><ul><li>.. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Getting around obstacles: What can library do? <ul><li>Stop thinking US vs. THEM </li></ul><ul><li>Meet with teachers, build relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Communicate professionally </li></ul><ul><li>Make library and its role more visible </li></ul><ul><li>Show his/her know-how </li></ul><ul><li>Answer needs, not assumed needs </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborate with teaching staff in new ways </li></ul><ul><li>Concentrate on teachers open for collaboration – do not force it! </li></ul><ul><li>.. </li></ul>Respect your expertise! Come out of the library!
  12. 12. Success requires.. <ul><li>Time </li></ul><ul><li>Communication </li></ul><ul><li>Caring </li></ul><ul><li>Presence </li></ul><ul><li>Shared collegiality </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding of common objective </li></ul>
  13. 13. Bibliography <ul><li>AMKIT Pedagogiikkaryhmä. Yhtämatkaa: Informaatiolukutaito haastaa opettajat ja informaatikot yhteistyöhön. Espoo: AMKIT-konsortio, 2006. Saatavissa: http://www.amkit.fi/download.php?a60516859b3859fb9108c34ad31e3955 </li></ul><ul><li>Fiegen, Ann M. & Cherry, Bennett & Watson, Kathleen. Reflections on collaboration: learning outcomes and information litercy assessment in the business curriculum. Reference Services Review 30 (2002): 4, pp. 307-318. Available: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/00907320210451295 </li></ul><ul><li>Godwin, Peter. Making life easier for academics: how librarians can help staff wether the technological storm. Journal of eLiteracy 2 (2005): 2, pp. 68-79. Available: http://www.jelit.org/59/ </li></ul><ul><li>Holtze, Terri L. 50+ ways to reach your faculty. Poster session presented at ACRL Conference in Denver, CO, 17.3.2001. Available: http://louisville.edu/~tlholt02/present/acrl2001.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Kotter, Wade R. Bridging the great divide: improving relations between librarians and classroom fafulty. Journal of Academic Librarianship 25 (1999): 4, pp. 294-303. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0099-1333(99)80030-5 </li></ul><ul><li>McGuinness, Claire. What faculty think: exploring the barriers to information literacy deveopment in undergraduate education. Journal of Academic Librarianship 32 (2006): 6, pp. 573-582. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acalib.2006.06.002 </li></ul><ul><li>Stevens, Christy R. Beyond preaching to the choir: information literacy, faculty outreach, and disciplnary journals. Journal of Academic Librarianship 2007 (in press). Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acalib.2006.08.009 </li></ul><ul><li>Yang, Zheng Ye Lan. University faculty’s perception of a library liaison program: a case study. Journal of Academic Librarianship 26 (2000): 2, pp. 124-128. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0099-1333(99)00149-4 </li></ul>

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