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Raising Kids in a Digital World
Holly Gerla & Sam Harris, Ethics 4 a Digital World
Emily McMason, Evolving Parents
Media =
Media =
Media ≠
Who are you raising right
now?
Brain Anatomy 101
“brain power” by Allan Ajifo (modub.net) is licensed under CC BY 2.0
The best part of parenting today is what we know
from studying the brain.
Image: Yale University Medical School
It can also feel like the worst...
20%
80%
20%
80%
Our job for the next decade (or more) is to be their prefrontal cortex.
The issues:
• Pre-frontal cortex isn’t fully online
• The ‘brakes’ aren’t wired
• The gas pedal is floored
The result:
We spend a lot of time asking “what were you thinking?”.
“I don’t know” is the response. They aren’t kidding.
...
The result:
“...adolescents aren’t reckless because they
underestimate risks, but rather because they
overestimate rewards...
The solution:
• Tell them short term consequences, not long term
ramifications. They aren’t planners. It won’t hook
them.
...
access:
What apps are your kids using? What are the age
requirements for each one?
• = 13 and
*
• = 14
• = 16
• = 17
• = 1...
access:
Making a decision...
– Talk to other families or do a quick search for
information
– Compare that to your family’s...
THE COMMON SENSE CENSUS: MEDIA USE BY TWEENS AND
TEENS, 2015
boundaries:
For young children
• consider how expensive the ‘toy’
• how often you will be reminding them of the rules
• an...
boundaries:
For young children
• Let’s talk about gaming - MINECRAFT!!!!!
• educational games vs. entertainment
• What is ...
boundaries:
For tweens & teens:
• No computers, phones, ithings in bedrooms.
• No texting / calling in the car.
• Ideally,...
boundaries:
Establish expectations early, but it’s never
too late
Contract examples:
Common Sense Media
● media use guidel...
instead:
• Weekday... first ___ / then___ expectations.
• Weekend family (fun!) options:
o Game nights.
o Rural walks / hi...
Why does media use matter?
Because it has a huge impact on non-media aspects of life.
• Attention:
• see vs. watch and thi...
Why does media use matter?
Sleep:
• 10 hours until age 10, then 9.5 hours
• Remember the nearly 9 & 6 hours of daily enter...
Why does media use matter?
Obesity:
o sitting, and sitting in front of a screen or not the same.
o Screen time messes with...
The biggest issues we see as
educators...
● Multitasking Myths
● Consumption vs. Creation
● Evaluation of Media for Educat...
What’s actually going on in your brain?
“Multitasking reduces your efficiency and performance
because your brain can only ...
Consumption vs. Creation
Evaluation of Media
S start with someone / something you trust
L listen to your instincts
O observe others around you. Wha...
The Newest Research and
Data
● AAP Guidelines: Media and Children (update coming
Oct. 2016)
● Kids and Screen Time: A Peek...
More Resources/Links
Safer Search engines:
• Duck, Duck Go
• KidRex
• KidzSearch
• SafeSearchKids
• GoGooligans
Sam and Ho...
Organizations to Follow:
• Common Sense Media - (Facebook, Twitter)
• Family Online Safety Institute - (Facebook, Twitter)...
Books!
• Bazelon, Emily - Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and
Rediscovering the Power of Character an...
Q&A
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Raising Kids in a Digital World 2016

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slides from our January 28, 2016 workshop at Charles Wright Academy.

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Raising Kids in a Digital World 2016

  1. 1. Raising Kids in a Digital World Holly Gerla & Sam Harris, Ethics 4 a Digital World Emily McMason, Evolving Parents
  2. 2. Media =
  3. 3. Media =
  4. 4. Media ≠
  5. 5. Who are you raising right now?
  6. 6. Brain Anatomy 101 “brain power” by Allan Ajifo (modub.net) is licensed under CC BY 2.0
  7. 7. The best part of parenting today is what we know from studying the brain. Image: Yale University Medical School
  8. 8. It can also feel like the worst... 20% 80%
  9. 9. 20% 80% Our job for the next decade (or more) is to be their prefrontal cortex.
  10. 10. The issues: • Pre-frontal cortex isn’t fully online • The ‘brakes’ aren’t wired • The gas pedal is floored
  11. 11. The result: We spend a lot of time asking “what were you thinking?”. “I don’t know” is the response. They aren’t kidding. Because…they have “less control over impulsive behavior, less understanding of the consequences, and fewer tools to stop the behavior.” Neuroscientist Frances Jensen
  12. 12. The result: “...adolescents aren’t reckless because they underestimate risks, but rather because they overestimate rewards – something that can be partially attributed to the fact that the reward centers of the adolescent brain are much more active than those of children or adults.” Ellen Kate, everyday feminism
  13. 13. The solution: • Tell them short term consequences, not long term ramifications. They aren’t planners. It won’t hook them. • Shock & awe – give them the jolt to pay attention & memorize results. • Be their brakes through the rules you have.
  14. 14. access: What apps are your kids using? What are the age requirements for each one? • = 13 and * • = 14 • = 16 • = 17 • = 18, or 13-17 w/ parents’ permission.
  15. 15. access: Making a decision... – Talk to other families or do a quick search for information – Compare that to your family’s values and rules – Read the Terms of Service
  16. 16. THE COMMON SENSE CENSUS: MEDIA USE BY TWEENS AND TEENS, 2015
  17. 17. boundaries: For young children • consider how expensive the ‘toy’ • how often you will be reminding them of the rules • and what a child is missing when they are in front of a screen.
  18. 18. boundaries: For young children • Let’s talk about gaming - MINECRAFT!!!!! • educational games vs. entertainment • What is the reward every time you open a new app? start a new game? beat the next level? • “what’s the difference between passion and obsession?”
  19. 19. boundaries: For tweens & teens: • No computers, phones, ithings in bedrooms. • No texting / calling in the car. • Ideally, no screens 90-120 minutes before bed. • No (extra) media during homework. • Know all their passwords. • Follow & read their digital messages.
  20. 20. boundaries: Establish expectations early, but it’s never too late Contract examples: Common Sense Media ● media use guidelines for K-5, 6-9, 9-12 ● customizable device contract Jo Langford, MA ● teen guidelines (many specific to boys)
  21. 21. instead: • Weekday... first ___ / then___ expectations. • Weekend family (fun!) options: o Game nights. o Rural walks / hikes. o Reading times. o Urban outings. • Media literacy: consumption, creation, communication.
  22. 22. Why does media use matter? Because it has a huge impact on non-media aspects of life. • Attention: • see vs. watch and think • 20 second rule • Fire it to wire it
  23. 23. Why does media use matter? Sleep: • 10 hours until age 10, then 9.5 hours • Remember the nearly 9 & 6 hours of daily entertainment media? • Chronic missed sleep leads to: o depression o acne o aggressive behavior o cognitive problems o learning difficulties
  24. 24. Why does media use matter? Obesity: o sitting, and sitting in front of a screen or not the same. o Screen time messes with appetite. o Kids ate more meals on screen days o They ate more calories at each meal o They ate fewer veggies. o And they reported feeling less hungry before the meal
  25. 25. The biggest issues we see as educators... ● Multitasking Myths ● Consumption vs. Creation ● Evaluation of Media for Education and Personal Use
  26. 26. What’s actually going on in your brain? “Multitasking reduces your efficiency and performance because your brain can only focus on one thing at a time. When you try to do two things at once, your brain lacks the capacity to perform both tasks successfully.” (Forbes, 2015) Multitasking Myths
  27. 27. Consumption vs. Creation
  28. 28. Evaluation of Media S start with someone / something you trust L listen to your instincts O observe others around you. What are they doing? Why? W wisdom - journal your experiences, collect your own wisdom.
  29. 29. The Newest Research and Data ● AAP Guidelines: Media and Children (update coming Oct. 2016) ● Kids and Screen Time: A Peek at Upcoming Guidance (NPR 1/6/2016) ● The Trouble with Talking Toys ● How Teens Share Information on Social Media (PEW) ● Common Sense Media Census 2015 (Full Report) (Handy InfoGraphic) ● Common Sense Media Parent Concerns
  30. 30. More Resources/Links Safer Search engines: • Duck, Duck Go • KidRex • KidzSearch • SafeSearchKids • GoGooligans Sam and Holly - Ethics 4 a Digital World - (Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest) Emily - evolving parents - (Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram) Browser add-ons or extensions: • AdBlock Plus • A Cleaner Internet • Simple Profanity Filter (for Chrome) • Ghostery (identify and block trackers) • Lightbeam (for Firefox) • Web of Trust In terms of devices or networks you use, every family is slightly different. If you’re looking for other tools to help you manage equipment, wifi, devices, etc. try a Google search using “parental controls” in the search string. And check with your internet service provider (ISP) for what controls they have available for your in- home networks.
  31. 31. Organizations to Follow: • Common Sense Media - (Facebook, Twitter) • Family Online Safety Institute - (Facebook, Twitter) • Pew Internet & American Life Project - (Facebook, Twitter) Adolescent Development: • Julie Giesy Metzger, RN, MN and Robert Lehman, MD, Great Conversations • Robin Wright, The Wright Conversations • Amy Lang, Birds + Bees + Kids • Jo Langford, Be Heroes Find even more links on our website. And “Like” us on Facebook or follow on Twitter for more current information. Thanks for attending our workshop! More Resources/Links
  32. 32. Books! • Bazelon, Emily - Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering the Power of Character and Empathy • boyd, danah - It's Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens • Englander, Elizabeth - Bullying and Cyberbullying: What Every Educator Needs to Know • James, Carrie - Disconnected: Youth, New Media, and the Ethics Gap • Jensen, Frances E. MD - The Teenage Brain: A Neuroscientist's Survival Guide to Raising Adolescents and Young Adults • Steinberg, Laurence, PhD - Age of Opportunity: Lessons from the New Science of Adolescence • Wiseman, Rosalind - Masterminds & Wingmen: Helping Our Boys Cope with Schoolyard Power, Locker-Room Tests, Girlfriends, and the New Rules of Boy World
  33. 33. Q&A

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