Community College of Rhode Island (CCRI)<br />A Comprehensive Research Project<br />
Overview of Presentation<br />Background<br />Students<br />Faculty<br />Governance and Administration<br />Finance<br />V...
Community Colleges of Rhode Island Consists of six community college campuses<br />Downcity Campus-Shephard Building (Prov...
Knight Campus<br />Liston Campus<br />Flanagan Campus<br />Newport County<br />CCRI Downcity<br />Satellite Campus<br />Co...
Background CCRI<br />The Community College of Rhode Island opened their doors in 1964 intending to serve only 300 students...
Background Continued<br />CCRI has a total current enrollment of 16,811 students<br />CCRI offers more than 80 certificate...
Background Continued<br />CCRI is governed by the Rhode Island Board of Governors for Higher Education<br />There are two ...
Student Characteristics<br />More than 70% of CCRI students transfer to a traditional four-year institution<br />Due to th...
Student Alumni DemographicsBased on graduation statistics 2008-2009<br />Average graduate age is 30 		- Female: 31 		- Mal...
Current Student Demographics<br />Full-Time – 38%<br />Part-Time – 62%<br />Female – 60%<br />Male – 40%<br />Minority Pop...
Current Student DemographicsContinued <br />Students age under 25 – 61.2% <br />Students age 25 and over – 38.8%<br />In-S...
CCRI Students<br />CCRI is an open-access institution <br />CCRI gives a variety of students the opportunity to obtain a d...
Faculty Community College of Rhode Island<br />Total  of 330 Full-Time Faculty Members<br />Total of 567Adjunct Faculty Me...
Faculty Full-Time Statistics<br />Female Full-Time Faculty Members – 208 - 63% of the total Faculty population<br />Male F...
FacultyFull-Time Statistics Continued<br />The majority of faculty hold a Master’s Degree with a smaller percentage holdin...
Governance and Administration<br />The Community Colleges of Rhode Island is governed by the Rhode Island Board of Governo...
Governance and AdministrationContinued<br />The RI Board of Governors is responsible for evaluating and implementing chang...
Aspects Controlled by Governors for Higher Education<br />Works to keep the price affordable and to make sufficient financ...
Governance and AdministrationIs the current CCRI system working?<br />According to a recent report from the Governor of Rh...
Finance Community College of Rhode Island<br />The overall financing is controlled by the Rhode Island Board of Governors ...
Current Budget and Financial  State Funding Information<br />("State Appropriation as a percentage of total revenue," 2010...
Current Budget and Financial  Tuition Funding Information<br />("Tuition as a percentage of total revenue," 2010)<br />
Full-Time Student Tuition Rates CCRI Vs. University of Rhode Island<br />URI<br />CCRI	<br />In-State: $10,661.00<br /> Re...
Vocational EducationCCRI<br />Career and Technical Training is part of the overall plan of CCRI’s Center for Workforce and...
("Career & technical training," 2010)<br />
CCRI Vocational Education <br />CCRI is the only publicly aligned Board of Governors community college in RI that offers t...
Developmental Educational Findings  at CCRI<br />Developmental Education is a developing process at CCRI<br />According to...
Developmental EducationContinued <br />CCRI has created the Developmental Education Advisory Group to evaluate and maintai...
Goals for Developmental Education Derived from the Advisory Group<br />Developmental students will be assessed and advised...
Goals for Developmental Education  Derived from the Advisory Group<br />Developmental students will persist in their cours...
Developmental Education Findings and Recommendations<br />A clear policy statement regarding Developmental Education will ...
Community Education Programs CCRI<br />Community Education / Personal Development<br />Adult Basic Education / Literacy Se...
Community Education / Personal Development <br />Community Education / Personal Development at CCRI offers noncredit cours...
Adult Basic Education / Literacy Services<br />ESL- English as a Second Language<br />GED Testing Sites<br />Transition / ...
Adult Basic Education / Literacy ServicesTransition / Bridge to College Program<br />The Center for Workforce and Communit...
Adult Basic Education / Literacy Services Workplace Literacy <br />A grant has been obtained through the RI Department of ...
Institute for Leadership & Organizational Development<br />“The Institute for Leadership and Organizational Development pr...
Institute for Leadership & Organizational Development <br />The Institute is partnered with AchieveGlobal- an “internation...
Workforce Training  & Corporate Education<br />Offers specifically required skills to an organization for organizational e...
Collegiate Education Statistical information provided by the Office of Institutional Research at CCRI: Fall 2009<br />Head...
Collegiate Education Statistical information provided by the Office of Institutional Research at CCRI: Fall 2009<br />A to...
CCRI Student TransferStatistical Information<br />CCRI in congruence with the Board of Governors encourages the ability to...
CCRI Student TransferStatistical Information<br />Transfer Fairs are held in order to assist students with transferring to...
CCRI Student TransferStatistical Information<br />Rhode Island College (RIC) receives more incoming transfer students from...
CCRI Student TransferStatistical Information<br />A Washington Post article may shed light on the increase of community co...
CCRI Student Retention Statistical Information<br />78% of first-time, full-time freshmen who enrolled fall of 2008 return...
CCRI Student Completion Rates<br />3 Year Completion Rate: 33.4% <br />7 Year Completion Rate: 61% - 63% <br />(LeBlanc, S...
ConclusionCCRI <br />CCRI gives students of varying academic aptitudes and interests the ability to seek higher education<...
CCRI Conclusion Cont.Recent Reports<br />According to the Governor of Rhode Island CCRI is not doing enough to enhance the...
Resources<br />Achieveglobal. (2008, December 23). Retrieved from http://www.ccri.edu/cwce/leadership/achieveglobal.shtml<...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Final project holli goodwin

832 views

Published on

Published in: Travel, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
832
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • As noted the Community College of Rhode Island presentation will cover the following areas: background, students, faculty, governance and administration, finance, vocational education, developmental education, community education, and collegiate education. The information provided shall provide a comprehensive explanation of the Community College of Rhode Island system.
  • The Community College of Rhode Island system is comprised of six community colleges, which are located on six different campuses throughout Rhode Island.
  • The community Colleges of Rhode Island celebrated their 45th anniversary in 2009. There have been a total of 54,000 students who have graduated from CCRI.
  • Although there are other notable higher education institutions in RI, such as four year institutions, technical, or proprietary institutions, CCRI is the only community college.Two notable institutions of higher education located in Rhode Island are Brown University and Bryant University.
  • There are many technical and proprietary schools, such as New England Technical Institute.There are articulation and transfer agreements in place for students, who plan to transfer from CCRI to RIC or URI.There are a total of over 200 certificate and degree programs offered through CCRI, RIC, and URI. Community Colleges of Rhode Island offers approximately 80 certificate and degree programs.
  • Two of the noted statics are impressive- 1) more than 70 percent of CCRI students transfer to a four-year institution; and 2) more than 90 percent of recent graduates are either continuing their education or are employed.
  • It was interesting to note that roughly eight percent of students, who graduated from CCRI were from Massachusetts. This would apparently be due to the Inter-state tuition rates, which provide tuition rates that are lower than out-of-state tuition rates. This appears to be much like the tuition waivers provided by the University System of Georgia.
  • The provided information is in congruence with many of the statistical information presented in the Cohen and Brawer information through the semester, such as the large number of students attending CCRI part-time.
  • The most prominent figure on this page is small portion of Non-Resident students. My home institution has a large number of Non-Resident students, so this is an unusual site. It would be interesting to compare these statistics to region Non-Resident statistics. Another surprising figure of the noted information is the large percentage of students who are considered traditional age college students. This could be a sign of the community college trend or economic trend.
  • I am always amazed that someone will be accepted into college without showing competence of basic high school skills. I appreciate the open-access acceptance opportunities; however, I am unsure how well someone will do in college without showing competence of basic skills.
  • Due to the large students population at CCRI there is a strong need for part-time adjunct faculty. The part-time adjunct faculty teach many evening and night classes. It is obvious that part-time adjunct faculty member play a large role in the CCRI community. This would be an interesting trend to study and determine whether this is a commonality among many similar community college systems. Also, as noted in future outlines, it appears vital to assess the impact of part-time adjunct faculty when assessing faculty at CCRI.
  • The above noted statistics do not include Part-Time adjunct faculty, because they are not calculated in the total statistical figures. As noted CCRI does contain a high number of part-time adjunct faculty; therefore, I feel it would be valuable for these numbers to be assessed as well.
  • When the full-time faculty and professional staff are compared, 31% of the professional staff hold Master’s Degrees; however, only 2.2% hold Doctoratal Degrees.
  • The Board of Governors is responsible for maintaining various standards and policies that impact the public higher education system of Rhode Island. The Board of Governors is has various committees, which are responsible for maintaining specific aspects of the public higher education system. The committees are: Academic and Student Affairs, Finance and Management/Facilities, Personnel, Government Relations, and Personnel Review.
  • The Board of Governors for Higher Education is much like the University System of Georgia’s Board of Regents’. Many of the rules and regulations for system institution are set by the Board. The Board of Governors controls most of large scale issues, such as tuition rates, standards, degree offered, etc. There are only three system schools in Rhode Island; however, the Board of Governors still maintains some interaction with non-system schools, again much like the University System of Georgia.
  • When trying to maintain a system standard it is vital that one entity be responsible for making decisions on standards, policies and procedures, etc. As it noted above the Board of Governors has a direct impact on the three system institutions, as is noted by the aspect of “establish[ing] a clear, distinct mission statement for each of the three institution…”
  • More will follow on the above mentioned report, which was recently filed by a committee charged with evaluating the preparedness of Rhode Islanders for employment. There were some Interesting details, but the president of CCRI was adamant that there must be financial support for the proposed changes. As is common during current times, CCRI has lost an amount of funding, but has been expected to over perform previous standards. This is an issue common in many organizations currently thanks to the economic situation.
  • The overall financing of community colleges has shifted from local monies to other financing options. As we have read numerous times in the Cohen and Brawer text community college this semester this is a common trend across many community college systems. The following charts will visually detail the financial shift. According to the American Association of Community Colleges CCRI does not receive any local monies that assist with financing. The above noted statistics obtained from CCRI validates these findings.
  • One can see how much the percentage of state funding has dropped in recent. As noted at the start of this chart, state funding allotted for over 70% of total revenue for CCRI. At the current time state funding make up only a little over 45% of the total budget for CCRI. Obviously the funding for CCRI has followed the path of many other community college systems, which is more financial responsibility faling on the institution.
  • As noted with the previously mentioned budget information. The financial support has shifted from state allocated funds to institutional supported funding, such as tuition. The initial percentage of tuition to the total budget was right at 25 percent; however, recently the shift has forced tuition to account for over 50 percent of the total operating budge for CCRI.
  • CCRI tuition is roughly $7000 cheaper than URI. This could be some of the reason CCRI has seen an increase in enrollment in the last year. The current economic situation could be playing a part. Students can obtain their Associates degree, then move on and graduate with a degree from a university.
  • CCRI has recently obtained criticism of it’s lack of vocational / technical education of Rhode Islanders. A recent study noted that only a handful of CCRI’s recent graduates were in vocational/technical areas. It may be that CCRI follows the trend of many technical institutions- the students obtain the training, but never actually complete the degree. There could be other factors involved as well, such as the other technical training institutions in Rhode Island.
  • Graduation rates indicate that there were 1254 Associate Degrees awarded, but only 162 Technical Degrees awarded.
  • New England Technical Institute is located in Rhode Island and may be a factor in the low technical education students at CCRI. Due to the small land size of Rhode Island, students may decide to go to a school that is specifically geared toward their technical educational needs.
  • Developmental education was the area that appeared to need to most clarification and definition for CCRI. It was very difficult to determine CCRI’s developmental educational path. Although, various potential policies and plans were noted to have been in the works to change several years ago, it was difficult to find proof of the changes. It is no surprise that much of the developmental education take place at the community college level. The surprising part of developmental education at CCRI was that lack of written policy and procedure.
  • Though a committee was created at CCRI, it was difficult to find much information in the way of absolute resolution of the system’s developmental education issues. It would be interesting to determine the actual current standing of the CCRI developmental education standing.
  • The goals noted for the intended Advisory Group appear to be on target with appropriate developmental education; however, the question still remains regarding the current standing.
  • The goals noted for the intended Advisory Group appear to be on target with appropriate developmental education; however, the question still remains regarding the current standing.
  • The concerning aspect is that the above noted recommendations were made in 2004-2005 and there is no evidence that any of them have been completed. There is no mention of developmental education assessments in the Institutional Research publications. Obviously the developmental education needed to be revamped, but it is unclear whether the recommendations have been met.
  • There are four main community education programs at CCRI- Community Education / Personal Development, Adult Basic Education / Literacy Services, Institute for Leadership &amp; Organizational Development, and Workforce Training &amp; Education. It does appear that there is an amount of overlap between the Institute for Leadership &amp; Organizational Development and Workforce Training &amp; Education components of the community education programming.
  • The Community Education / Personal Development at CCRI is an average continuing education component. Various general interests classes are offered in a non-credit capacity.
  • Adult basic education offers four genres of assistance programming, which are all aimed at encouraging a more employable population in Rhode Island. Two of the four programs offered will be discussed in detail, as the other programs are self explanatory- ESL and GED Testing Sites.
  • CCRI partners with two adult service organizations in order to assist adult students with the transition to higher education. The two organizations are: Dorcas Place and Rhode Island Regional Adult Learning Center (RIRAL). Both of the agencies provide services to adults for the academic transition.
  • In order to better assist the organizations of Rhode Island CCRI offers the Workplace Literacy component. This program is meant to offer services that will assist employees at various RI organizations. The services may be ESL courses or basic reading courses as noted. The special feature of this program is that the courses are specifically designed to meet the needs to the RI employers.
  • The Institute for Leadership &amp; Organizational Development appears to be an amazing program offered by CCRI; however, I am a somewhat perplexed due to potential overlap between the Workforce Literacy program.
  • The Institute for Leadership &amp; Organization Development offers over 120 workshops on a range of workplace topics. The topics include Facilitating for Results, Frontline Leadership Supervisory Skills, Quality Enhancement, Team Leadership, Team Effectiveness, etc. The workshops are offered at the Providence Community College location, which cuts down extra costs to employers. One of the programs that is presented by the Institute is a First Friday networking meeting. This provides an opportunity for community leaders and employers to meet.
  • Workforce Training &amp; Corporate Education offers services, such as workplace Spanish, Basic Management Skills, Health and Safety, etc. There are several benefits associated with the program, such as the services can be offered on-site instead of at an off-site facility location, the services can be tailored specifically to the needs of the organization, etc. In my opinion, this looks like a great program; however, it appears to offer services that overlap with the Adult Education Workforce Literacy program.
  • There are a couple of statistics that are notable from the above information. The first statistical component that is interesting is the increase in the number of students over the age of twenty-five. This could be a direct tie to the recent economic status. Another interesting find is the decrease of the non-degree students. As noted previously, CCRI has been cited for not doing enough to produce vocational / technical students. This would be a direct indication of the noted need for better vocational / technical outreach, as those students would fall in this category.
  • The above information appears to correlate to the information provided regarding the number of students, who transfer to a four-year institution.
  • The Board of Governors appears to be intrinsically interesting in creating a clear and distinct path toward transfer capabilities. As noted a transfer counselor can be provided and information is readily available on the Board of Governors website regarding transfer information.
  • I was amazed at the wealth of information provided on the transfer process. The information was easy to locate and understand what needed to take place for the transition process.
  • It’s interesting statistically that one of the two system schools receives more transfer students from CCRI than the other. It would be interesting to determine the true cause of this statistic.
  • The article noted was an interesting potential insight to the reason for the number of students attending community college. As noted previously, the economy probably does have an impact on the community college population.
  • The retention statistics are impressive for first-time, full-time students. It’s also amazing that over 60 percent of the students are still enrolled a year after beginning the process. Again, the noted intended transfer rate is comparable to the actual transfer students.
  • The completion rates do not look as impressive as the retention rates, especially the three year completion rate. The seven year completion rate is very impressive however. The longer time spent earning a degree is consistent with the community college population, as many students may come and go or work while obtaining a degree.
  • As noted throughout the presentation, CCRI appears to be a great place to begin one’s educational journey. With impressive transfer statistics it is a place that propels students toward four-year degree completion. The major area of need is the developmental education provided at CCRI. It doesn’t appear to have a great deal of definitive policy and procedure.
  • I was amazed at the criticism toward CCRI with respect toward the vocational / technical systems. There is only so much that the CCRI can be expected to contribute, especially with the recent loss in funding. That being said, CCRI will hopefully find a solution to their low vocational / technical student ratios. Overall I am impressed with the CCRI system and most notably the transfer process to other system schools.
  • Final project holli goodwin

    1. 1. Community College of Rhode Island (CCRI)<br />A Comprehensive Research Project<br />
    2. 2. Overview of Presentation<br />Background<br />Students<br />Faculty<br />Governance and Administration<br />Finance<br />Vocational Education<br />Developmental Education<br />Community Education<br />Collegiate Education<br />
    3. 3. Community Colleges of Rhode Island Consists of six community college campuses<br />Downcity Campus-Shephard Building (Providence)<br />Flanagan Campus (Lincoln) <br />Knight Campus (Warwick) <br />Liston Campus (Providence) <br />Newport County Campus (Newport) <br />Satellite Campus-Westerly High School (Westerly)<br />(http://www.citytowninfo.com/school-profiles/community-college-of-rhode-island)<br />
    4. 4. Knight Campus<br />Liston Campus<br />Flanagan Campus<br />Newport County<br />CCRI Downcity<br />Satellite Campus<br />Community Colleges of Rhode Island<br />
    5. 5. Background CCRI<br />The Community College of Rhode Island opened their doors in 1964 intending to serve only 300 students<br />CCRI quickly surged past their expectation, and now have over 54,000 alumni <br />CCRI is a public open access institution that offers certificates, degrees, and noncredit workforce training programming("Cticollegesearch," 2004) (Di Pasquale, 2009)<br />
    6. 6. Background Continued<br />CCRI has a total current enrollment of 16,811 students<br />CCRI offers more than 80 certificate and degree majors <br />CCRI is the largest community college in the Northeast United States<br />CCRI is the only community college in Rhode Island<br />("Cticollegesearch," 2004)<br />
    7. 7. Background Continued<br />CCRI is governed by the Rhode Island Board of Governors for Higher Education<br />There are two other public higher education institutions in Rhode Island - Rhode Island College (RIC) - University of Rhode Island (URI)<br />("Welcome to ribghe," 2003)<br />
    8. 8. Student Characteristics<br />More than 70% of CCRI students transfer to a traditional four-year institution<br />Due to the Center for Workforce and Community Education there are more than 32,000 registrations annually<br />Over 54,000 students have graduated from CCRI<br />More than 90% of recent CCRI graduates are continuing their education , are employed, or both<br />(Di Pasquale, 2009)<br />
    9. 9. Student Alumni DemographicsBased on graduation statistics 2008-2009<br />Average graduate age is 30 - Female: 31 - Male: 28<br /> Over 68% are female<br />90% of students are from Rhode Island<br />8% of students are from Massachusetts<br />Over 15% minorities <br />("Graduate facts 2008-2009," 2009)<br />
    10. 10. Current Student Demographics<br />Full-Time – 38%<br />Part-Time – 62%<br />Female – 60%<br />Male – 40%<br />Minority Population – 23%<br />Non-Minority Population – 66%<br />Unreported Population – 11% <br />(LeBlanc, Savastano, Gaafar, & Roberts, 2009)<br />
    11. 11. Current Student DemographicsContinued <br />Students age under 25 – 61.2% <br />Students age 25 and over – 38.8%<br />In-State student Population – 95%<br />Out-of-State Student Population – 4.6%<br />Non-Resident Alien - .1% <br />Students who receive Financial Aid – 46%<br />(LeBlanc, Savastano, Gaafar, & Roberts, 2009)<br />
    12. 12. CCRI Students<br />CCRI is an open-access institution <br />CCRI gives a variety of students the opportunity to obtain a degree or job training skills in technical and college general education courses<br />A high school diploma or equivalent is not a general admission requirement of the College, provided the student is 18 years of age<br />("Admissions information," 2008)<br />(Di Pasquale, 2009)<br />
    13. 13. Faculty Community College of Rhode Island<br />Total of 330 Full-Time Faculty Members<br />Total of 567Adjunct Faculty Members<br />(LeBlanc, Savastano, Gaafar, & Roberts, 2009)<br />
    14. 14. Faculty Full-Time Statistics<br />Female Full-Time Faculty Members – 208 - 63% of the total Faculty population<br />Male Full-Time Faculty Members – 122 - 37% of the total Faculty population<br />(LeBlanc, Savastano, Gaafar, & Roberts, 2009)<br />
    15. 15. FacultyFull-Time Statistics Continued<br />The majority of faculty hold a Master’s Degree with a smaller percentage holding a Doctorate<br />Over 76% of faculty hold a Master’s<br />Over 21% of faculty hold a Doctorate<br />(LeBlanc, Savastano, Gaafar, & Roberts, 2009)<br />
    16. 16. Governance and Administration<br />The Community Colleges of Rhode Island is governed by the Rhode Island Board of Governors<br />“The mission of the Rhode Island Board of Governors for Higher Education is to provide an excellent, efficient, accessible and affordable system of higher education designed to improve the overall educational attainment of Rhode Islanders and thereby enrich the intellectual, economic, social and cultural life of the state, its residents, and its communities("Board of governors'," 2004).”<br />("Board of governors'," 2004)<br />
    17. 17. Governance and AdministrationContinued<br />The RI Board of Governors is responsible for evaluating and implementing changes to the curriculum, tuition, etc. of CCRI<br />Institutions which are not part of the RI system , such as private or proprietary schools are still held to the Board of Governors standards<br />("Powers and duties," 2003)<br />
    18. 18. Aspects Controlled by Governors for Higher Education<br />Works to keep the price affordable and to make sufficient financial aid available<br /> Establishes a clear and distinct mission statement for each of the three institutions<br />Encourages cooperative ventures with other education and training sectors and with institutions of higher education around the world<br />("Powers and duties," 2003)<br />
    19. 19. Governance and AdministrationIs the current CCRI system working?<br />According to a recent report from the Governor of Rhode Island, CCRI must start doing a better job of training Rhode Islanders for local industry- specifically technical industy<br />CCRI must provide “soft skills” (Jordan, 2010) wanted by employers, such as communication skills<br />(Jordan, 2010)<br />
    20. 20. Finance Community College of Rhode Island<br />The overall financing is controlled by the Rhode Island Board of Governors for Higher Education <br />CCRI has a total FY2010 budget of $98, 161,402<br />45 % of the budget comes from state appropriations <br />55 % comes from other college revenues, including tuition and fees from students<br />CCRI receives no local monies toward operational costs<br />(Di Pasquale, 2010)<br />("Member institutions in rhode island," 2010)<br />
    21. 21. Current Budget and Financial State Funding Information<br />("State Appropriation as a percentage of total revenue," 2010)<br />
    22. 22. Current Budget and Financial Tuition Funding Information<br />("Tuition as a percentage of total revenue," 2010)<br />
    23. 23. Full-Time Student Tuition Rates CCRI Vs. University of Rhode Island<br />URI<br />CCRI <br />In-State: $10,661.00<br /> Regional/Inter-State: $ 16,841.00 <br />Out-of-State: $ 27,159.00 <br />In-State: $3,080.00<br />Regional/Inter-State: $4,620.00<br />Out-of-State: $8,712.00<br />("Tuition & fees," 2010)<br />("Tuition and fee information," 2010)<br />
    24. 24. Vocational EducationCCRI<br />Career and Technical Training is part of the overall plan of CCRI’s Center for Workforce and Community Education division<br />The aim of the Career and Technical training is to increase and supplement Rhode Island’s economic development<br />Technical education is a smaller aspect of CCRI than the Associate transfer program<br />Only one of the top five majors at CCRI is Vocational / Technical in nature - Licensed Practical Nursing (LPN) <br />("Career & technical training," 2010)<br />
    25. 25. ("Career & technical training," 2010)<br />
    26. 26. CCRI Vocational Education <br />CCRI is the only publicly aligned Board of Governors community college in RI that offers technical degrees <br />There are eleven other technical or proprietary schools located in RI, which may explain the lack of technical degrees conferred by CCRI<br />("Institutions and organizations," )<br />
    27. 27. Developmental Educational Findings at CCRI<br />Developmental Education is a developing process at CCRI<br />According to a 2002 study conducted by The Institute for Higher Education Policy and the New England Resource Center there were no written policies dictating Developmental Education in RI<br />The majority of Developmental Education was taking place at the community college level at the time of the study<br />(Lucy-Allen, & Merisotis, 2002)<br />
    28. 28. Developmental EducationContinued <br />CCRI has created the Developmental Education Advisory Group to evaluate and maintain Developmental Education <br />The mission of the Advisory Group is: “Developmental Education is designed to help students enhance their chances for academic success by providing opportunities for skill development through courses and programs designed to improve basic skills in writing, reading and mathematics ("Developmental education committee," 2008).”<br />("Developmental education committee," 2008)<br />
    29. 29. Goals for Developmental Education Derived from the Advisory Group<br />Developmental students will be assessed and advised for placement in the appropriate developmental courses<br />Developmental students will be enrolled in the appropriate developmental courses<br />Developmental students will be retained in their developmental courses<br />("Developmental education committee," 2008)<br />
    30. 30. Goals for Developmental Education Derived from the Advisory Group<br />Developmental students will persist in their coursework<br />Developmental students will demonstrate student learning outcomes in writing, math and reading by passing developmental courses<br />Developmental students will be satisfied with their developmental coursework <br />("Developmental education committee," 2008)<br />
    31. 31. Developmental Education Findings and Recommendations<br />A clear policy statement regarding Developmental Education will be completed<br />Students who are assessed and who require two or more assessment-designated courses should be automatically enrolled in a new program - General Studies Prep<br />Work to develop a Summer Academy program to package developmental coursework for summer completion prior to fall enrollment<br />("Developmental education committee," 2008)<br />
    32. 32. Community Education Programs CCRI<br />Community Education / Personal Development<br />Adult Basic Education / Literacy Services<br />Institute for Leadership & Organizational Development<br />Workforce Training & Education<br />
    33. 33. Community Education / Personal Development <br />Community Education / Personal Development at CCRI offers noncredit courses in a variety of subjects, such as: - Community Spanish - Motorcycle Safety Training - Self Defense - SAT Prep<br />("Community education /," 2009)<br />
    34. 34. Adult Basic Education / Literacy Services<br />ESL- English as a Second Language<br />GED Testing Sites<br />Transition / Bridge to College Program<br />Workplace Literacy Programs<br />
    35. 35. Adult Basic Education / Literacy ServicesTransition / Bridge to College Program<br />The Center for Workforce and Community Education partner’s with adult education agencies to ease the transition of nontraditional students to collegiate life <br />Tutoring and mentoring are provided by the adult education agencies and a class is provided at CCRI<br />("Transition / bridge," 2010)<br />
    36. 36. Adult Basic Education / Literacy Services Workplace Literacy <br />A grant has been obtained through the RI Department of Education that provides literacy services to employers in Rhode Island<br />Classes are designed specifically to meet the employer needs<br /> Services provided include: ESL; basic reading, writing, and math skills; and GED preparation <br />("Workplace literacy," 2008)<br />
    37. 37. Institute for Leadership & Organizational Development<br />“The Institute for Leadership and Organizational Development provides high-quality customized training programs, public offerings, and certification preparation courses to the Rhode Island business community ("Institute for leadership &," 2010).”<br />("Institute for leadership &," 2010)<br />
    38. 38. Institute for Leadership & Organizational Development <br />The Institute is partnered with AchieveGlobal- an “internationally recognized supplier of modular skill-based training systems focused on achieving optimal performance through organizational change ("Achieveglobal," 2008)”<br />("Achieveglobal," 2008)<br />
    39. 39. Workforce Training & Corporate Education<br />Offers specifically required skills to an organization for organizational employees<br />Goal is to “maximize the productivity” of various Rhode Island organizations<br />Offers various credit and non-credit programs to train organizational employees <br />("Workforce training & corporate education," 2009)<br />
    40. 40. Collegiate Education Statistical information provided by the Office of Institutional Research at CCRI: Fall 2009<br />Headcount enrollment increased by 148 students or 0.8% <br />Full-time Equivalency enrollment rose by 1.5% <br />Full-time students in the over age 25 group increased by 200 or 26.1%<br />Non-degree students decreased by 109 or 6.8%. <br />(LeBlanc, Savastano, Gaafar, & Roberts, 2009)<br />
    41. 41. Collegiate Education Statistical information provided by the Office of Institutional Research at CCRI: Fall 2009<br />A total of 3,331 degree-seeking first-time students entered CCRI fall 2009<br />66.7% (2,223) plan to transfer and 28.7% or 639 of these students plan to transfer before earning a degree at CCRI<br />(LeBlanc, Savastano, Gaafar, & Roberts, 2009)<br />
    42. 42. CCRI Student TransferStatistical Information<br />CCRI in congruence with the Board of Governors encourages the ability to transfer from one system institution to another<br />Transfer information is readily available through a Transfer Counselor<br />CCRI has an articulation agreement with Rhode Island College and University of Rhode Island<br />("Ri transfers," 2006)<br />
    43. 43. CCRI Student TransferStatistical Information<br />Transfer Fairs are held in order to assist students with transferring to four-year institutions<br />Transfer guides online are readily available at various locations- on the CCRI, RIC, URI, and Board of Governors websites<br />The website has great transfer information and links to a wealth of information http://www.ribghe.org/ritransfers.htm<br />
    44. 44. CCRI Student TransferStatistical Information<br />Rhode Island College (RIC) receives more incoming transfer students from CCRI than any other institution<br />After RIC University of Rhode Island (URI) receives the next highest number of incoming transfer students from CCRI<br />“Transfers to Rhode Island College increased over 29 percent from 2006 to 2007. For 2004 and 2006, the number of transfers to the University of Rhode Island (URI) were the highest on record (LeBlanc, Savastano, Gaafar, & Roberts, 2009)”<br />(LeBlanc, Savastano, Gaafar, & Roberts, 2009)<br />
    45. 45. CCRI Student TransferStatistical Information<br />A Washington Post article may shed light on the increase of community college transfer students<br />As noted in the article the economy may be the culprit of the high community college transfer rate<br />The cost of tuition can make all of the difference in collegiate location. As noted previously there is roughly $7000 difference between CCRI and URI<br />(Crenshaw, 2002)<br />
    46. 46. CCRI Student Retention Statistical Information<br />78% of first-time, full-time freshmen who enrolled fall of 2008 returned for the spring of 2009 <br />62.4% of first-time, full-time freshmen are still enrolled after one year (fall to fall) <br />69% of first-time freshmen had an initial goal to transfer <br />(LeBlanc, Savastano, Gaafar, & Roberts, 2009)<br />
    47. 47. CCRI Student Completion Rates<br />3 Year Completion Rate: 33.4% <br />7 Year Completion Rate: 61% - 63% <br />(LeBlanc, Savastano, Gaafar, & Roberts, 2009)<br />
    48. 48. ConclusionCCRI <br />CCRI gives students of varying academic aptitudes and interests the ability to seek higher education<br />CCRI appears to have a great transfer system in place for students, who wish to obtain a four-year degree<br />One area lacking at CCRI is Developmental Education <br />There are numerous community workforce programs offered by CCRI; however a couple of the programs appear to overlap<br />
    49. 49. CCRI Conclusion Cont.Recent Reports<br />According to the Governor of Rhode Island CCRI is not doing enough to enhance the technical workforce of RI<br />CCRI President Ray Di Pasquale responded to the findings and noted that the budget has caused issues with the process<br />Apparently the issue is that only a small portion of graduates from CCRI are in the technical / vocational area<br />A “career pathway” is expected to be created by CCRI, which will create a clear path to key industrial technical / vocational fields <br />(Jordan, 2010)<br />
    50. 50. Resources<br />Achieveglobal. (2008, December 23). Retrieved from http://www.ccri.edu/cwce/leadership/achieveglobal.shtml<br />Admissions information. (2008, November 26). Retrieved from http://www.ccri.edu/oes/admissions/admn_info.shtml<br />Board of governors' mission statement. (2004, August 10). Retrieved from http://www.ribghe.org/mission.htm<br />Career & technical training. (2010, April 19). Retrieved from http://www.ccri.edu/cwce/career/<br />Community education / personal development. (2009, December 11). Retrieved from http://www.ccri.edu/cwce/personal/<br />Crenshaw, A. (2002, March 17). Community college: a good start at a good price. The Washington Post, Retrieved from http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn?pagename=article&node=&contentId=A36523-2002Mar16<br />Cticollegesearch. (2004). Retrieved from (http://www.citytowninfo.com/school-profiles/community-college-of-rhode-island)<br />Developmental education committee. (2008, November 19). Retrieved from http://www.ccri.edu/dean-as/devevelopmentaled/index.shtml<br />Di Pasquale, R. (2010, March 18). A Budget and financial update. Retrieved from http://www.ccri.edu/president/budget_03182010.shtml<br />Di Pasquale, Ray. (2009, December 22). A Message from the president. Retrieved from http://www.ccri.edu/president/message.shtml<br />DiPasquale, R. (2010, February 19). Fy2010 mid-year financial review. Retrieved from http://www.ccri.edu/businessaffairs/businessoffice/CCRI-FY2010-Mid-Year-Review-Docs.pdf<br />Graduate facts 2008-2009. (2009, October 20). Retrieved from http://www.ccri.edu/irpl/GRADUATES.shtml<br />Institutions and organizations. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.ribghe.org/inst.htm#riprop<br />Institute for leadership &. (2010, March 26). Retrieved from http://www.ccri.edu/cwce/leadership/<br />Jordan, J. (2010, April 15). Ccri urged to redirect efforts. The Providence Journal , Retrieved from http://www.projo.com/news/content/ccri_workforce_04-15-10_5GI4FMI_v33.389e37f.html<br />LeBlanc, William, Savastano, Jeanne, Gaafar, Naglaa, & Roberts, April. (2009). Facts and figures 2008-2009 office of institutional. Retrieved from http://www.ccri.edu/irpl/2009/pdfs/Facts_and_Figures_2008-2009.pdf<br />Lucy-Allen, D, & Merisotis, j. (Ed.). (2002). Developmental education and college opportunity in new england: lessons for a national study of state and system policy impacts. Washington, DC: The Institute for Higher Education Policy.<br />Member institutions in rhode island. (2010). Retrieved from http://www.aacc.nche.edu/Pages/CCFinderStateResults.aspx?state=RI<br />Powers and duties of the board of governors. (2003, September 22). Retrieved from http://www.ribghe.org/power.htm<br />Ri transfers. (2006, September 26). Retrieved from http://www.ribghe.org/ritransfers.htm<br />State Appropriation as a percentage of total revenue. (2010, April 26). Retrieved from http://www.ccri.edu/businessaffairs/businessoffice/CCRI_State_Appropriation_as_Percentage_of_Total_Revenue.shtml<br />Transition / bridge to college programs . (2010, March 15). Retrieved from http://www.ccri.edu/cwce/abe/transition.shtml<br />Tuition & fees. (2010, April 02). Retrieved from http://www.ccri.edu/bursar/tuition_fees.shtml<br />Tuition and fee information (2009-2010). (2010). Retrieved from http://www.uri.edu/es/acadinfo/acadyear/tuition.html<br />Tuition as a percentage of total revenue. (2010, April 26). Retrieved from http://www.ccri.edu/businessaffairs/businessoffice/CCRI_Tuition_as_Percentage_of_Total_Revenue.shtml<br />Welcome to ribghe. (2003). Retrieved from http://www.ribghe.org/default.htm<br />Workplace literacy. (2008, December 22). Retrieved from http://www.ccri.edu/cwce/abe/workplaceliteracy.shtml<br />Workforce training & corporate education. (2009, December 03). Retrieved from http://www.ccri.edu/cwce/workforce/<br />

    ×