ASSETS'11 Doctoral Consortium

545 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
545
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

ASSETS'11 Doctoral Consortium

  1. 1. Disabled ‘R’ AllBridging the gap between Health and Situational Impairments Hugo Nicolau hman@vimmi.inesc-id.pt Prof. Joaquim Jorge
  2. 2. Increasingly popular
  3. 3. Powerful tools
  4. 4. Always near us
  5. 5. @ Home
  6. 6. @ Work
  7. 7. Outdoors
  8. 8. In car
  9. 9. @ Coffee shop
  10. 10. @ Subway
  11. 11. And many many others …
  12. 12. Many contexts CONTEXT
  13. 13. Overload
  14. 14. Leading to …Situationally-Induced Impairments and Disabilities [Sears, 2003]
  15. 15. Motor capabilities
  16. 16. Loss of physical stabilityBrewster, 2002Mizobuchi et al., 2005Lin et al., 2007Schildbach and Rukzio, 2010Bergstrom-Lehtovirta et al., 2011
  17. 17. Same old challenges Brown, 1992 Vanderheiden, 1993 Edwards, 1995 Poulson et al. 1996 Trewin and Pain, 1999
  18. 18. Do they share … Similar problems? [Yesilada et al., 2010]
  19. 19. Do they benefit from … Similar solutions?
  20. 20. Goal
  21. 21. Technology Transfer HIID solutions SIID Health-Induced Situational-Induced Impairments and Impairments and Disabilities Disabilities
  22. 22. Knowledge sharing and reuse
  23. 23. “Reinventing the wheel”
  24. 24. More and better research
  25. 25. Cost and availability
  26. 26. New connotation
  27. 27. Hypothesis“Solutions designed for health-inducedimpairments can be applied to situational-induced impairments increasing the users’performance, by assessing their capabilitieswithin real mobile contexts. ”
  28. 28. APPROACH
  29. 29. Workplan HIID SIID Users’Similar problems? characterizationWhich solutions? DevelopmentSimilar solutions? Evaluation
  30. 30. Similar problems?
  31. 31. Text-Entry
  32. 32. Capture abilities
  33. 33. Differences and Similarities
  34. 34. Workplan HIID SIID Users’Similar problems? characterizationWhich solutions? DevelopmentSimilar solutions? Evaluation
  35. 35. SIID Results3 Walking conditionsseated, slow walking, normal walking (2 steps / sec)3 Hand posturesone-hand/two-hand portrait; two-hand landscapeMajor Results:Error rate increases with mobilitySubstitutions are the most common error type (7%)93% are due to poor aimingRight-key substitution
  36. 36. HIID ProcedureElderly60 – 80 years oldTremor disordersAge related, Action tremor, Posturaltremor, Essential tremorCharacterize users’ tremorAccelerometer, questionnaires, spiraltest, medical diagnosisLarger screen sizes
  37. 37. Workplan HIID SIID Users’Similar problems? characterizationWhich solutions? Development Mobile prototypesSimilar solutions? Evaluation
  38. 38. Text-entry SolutionsFilters e.g. [Trewin, 2002]Orthographic correctors e.g. [Kane et al., 2008]Adaptive keyboards e.g. [Merlin and Raynal, 2010]Alternative techniques e.g. [Wobbrock et al., 2003]
  39. 39. Workplan HIID SIID Users’Similar problems? characterizationWhich solutions? Development Mobile prototypesSimilar solutions? Hypothesis validation Evaluation and Guidelines
  40. 40. Expected Results1. Relationship between physical and situational impairments2. Guidelines to transfer solutions between user groups3. Transferability Index
  41. 41. Questions to the ConsortiumIs this a valid approach (technology transfer)?Should I develop novel solutions? ?? ??
  42. 42. THE ENDHugo Nicolauhman@vimmi.inesc-id.pt
  43. 43. Discussion

×