Civ & Lit - Miller/Hinrichs
--Chalk Talk--
Genocide
Holocaust
Crimes against humanity
What do these terms mean to you? Wha...
Civ & Lit - Miller/Hinrichs
By Elie Wiesel
“The Holocaust is a central event in many people’s
lives, but it has also becom...
Civ & Lit - Miller/Hinrichs
Genocide
Geno – from the
Greek word genos,
which means birth,
race, of a similar
kind
Geno-cid...
Civ & Lit - Miller/Hinrichs
Genocide
Task: In your notes, create a cluster diagram or web
around the term and definition o...
Civ & Lit - Miller/Hinrichs
Essential questions…
(We will answer
these in this unit.)• How should we remember past
genocid...
Civ & Lit - Miller/Hinrichs
How does Elie Wiesel convey the
inhumanity and humanity
associated with the Holocaust
in the n...
Civ & Lit - Miller/Hinrichs
The novel begins in Sighet,
Transylvania.
During the early years of World War
II, Sighet remai...
Civ & Lit - Miller/Hinrichs
Civ & Lit - Miller/Hinrichs
In 1944, however,
Elie and all the
other Jews in town
were rounded up in
cattle cars and
depor...
Civ & Lit - Miller/Hinrichs
They were
sent to
Auschwitz and
another
concentration
camp.
Night continued…
Roll call in Buch...
Civ & Lit - Miller/Hinrichs
After surviving the Nazi
concentration camps,
Wiesel vowed never to
write about his horrific
e...
Civ & Lit - Miller/Hinrichs
Night unit overview
• Reading stories by survivors of the
Holocaust
• Reading Night by Elie Wi...
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  • Use the space provided to jot down some of your ideas about what are characteristics of a good short story:
  • Night introduction pp

    1. 1. Civ & Lit - Miller/Hinrichs --Chalk Talk-- Genocide Holocaust Crimes against humanity What do these terms mean to you? What do they make you think of? What words or ideas come to mind in thinking about these terms? What questions (I wonder why?) can you come up with related to these terms? Make notes on your paper.
    2. 2. Civ & Lit - Miller/Hinrichs By Elie Wiesel “The Holocaust is a central event in many people’s lives, but it has also become a metaphor for our century. There cannot be an end to speaking and writing about it.” -Aharon Appelfeld
    3. 3. Civ & Lit - Miller/Hinrichs Genocide Geno – from the Greek word genos, which means birth, race, of a similar kind Geno-cide -Cide – from the French word cida, which means to cut, kill
    4. 4. Civ & Lit - Miller/Hinrichs Genocide Task: In your notes, create a cluster diagram or web around the term and definition of Genocide. Include at least 5-7 important concepts. You may incorporate ideas we covered in the “chalk talk”
    5. 5. Civ & Lit - Miller/Hinrichs Essential questions… (We will answer these in this unit.)• How should we remember past genocides or crimes against humanity? Why should we? • How does human conflict at all levels impact society and the people in it? • What social responsibility do we have to prevent future crimes against humanity? • How does Elie Wiesel convey the inhumanity and humanity associated with the Holocaust in the novel Night?
    6. 6. Civ & Lit - Miller/Hinrichs How does Elie Wiesel convey the inhumanity and humanity associated with the Holocaust in the novel Night? Inhumanity – Humanity – With a partner, come up with a definition for each of these terms. Be ready to share
    7. 7. Civ & Lit - Miller/Hinrichs The novel begins in Sighet, Transylvania. During the early years of World War II, Sighet remained relatively unaffected by the war. The Jews in Sighet believed that they would be safe from the persecution that Jews in Germany and Poland suffered. Elie Wiesel’s Night…
    8. 8. Civ & Lit - Miller/Hinrichs
    9. 9. Civ & Lit - Miller/Hinrichs In 1944, however, Elie and all the other Jews in town were rounded up in cattle cars and deported to concentration camps in Poland. He was 14. Night continued…
    10. 10. Civ & Lit - Miller/Hinrichs They were sent to Auschwitz and another concentration camp. Night continued… Roll call in Buchenwald, February 1941
    11. 11. Civ & Lit - Miller/Hinrichs After surviving the Nazi concentration camps, Wiesel vowed never to write about his horrific experiences. He eventually changed his mind and wrote Night in 1955. Wiesel won the Nobel Prize in 1986 Night continued…
    12. 12. Civ & Lit - Miller/Hinrichs Night unit overview • Reading stories by survivors of the Holocaust • Reading Night by Elie Wiesel • Completing study questions for each chapter • Discussion of Night • Vocabulary from Night • Reading poetry about the Holocaust • Writing poetry related to and inspired by the novel…

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