 They’re

our signal that a text is poetry, not

prose.
 They can create rhythm.
 They control the pace/speed of a poem...
 When

people read your poem out loud, or
in their heads, they will pause slightly at
the end of each line.
 For example...
Hickory, dickory, dock.
The mouse ran up the clock.
The clock struck one
And down he run;
Hickory, dickory, dock.




Lines control the pace
of the poem.
Shortening or
lengthening the lines
can speed up or slow
down the way people
rea...
Crippled with desire, he
questioned it. Evening
upon the heights,
juice of the pomegranate:
who
could connect it with sunl...
 Arranged

to emphasize and compliment
the other (musical, contextual, etc.)
elements of language
 How

the poem looks on the page - Does
the poem look light, delicate, with a lot of
white space around the lines? Or are...
William Carlos Williams’
“This Is Just to Say”
in Varied Forms
This is just to say I have eaten the plums that were in the icebox
and which you were probably saving for breakfast. Forgi...
This Is Just to Say

This Is Just to Say

I have eaten the plums that were in the icebox
and which you were probably savin...
 Stanza is Italian for “room”
• Think of stanzas of a poem as rooms of a house
 Indicates a pause
 Often coincides with...
This Is Just to Say

This Is Just to Say

I
have
eaten
the plums
that were in
the icebox
and which
you were
probably
savin...
This Is Just to Say

This Is Just to Say

I
have
eaten

I have eaten
the plums
that were in
the icebox

the plums
that wer...
 What

happens when you break a
line/stanza mid-sentence?
 Justification

(left, right, center)

 Font

• Typeface
• Size

• Bold/italics/underline
 Shape

of poems

 Tabs
 Sp...
attack my mind with
complete and utter chaos.

- Ashley J.
Cw poetry the_page13
Cw poetry the_page13
Cw poetry the_page13
Cw poetry the_page13
Cw poetry the_page13
Cw poetry the_page13
Cw poetry the_page13
Cw poetry the_page13
Cw poetry the_page13
Cw poetry the_page13
Cw poetry the_page13
Cw poetry the_page13
Cw poetry the_page13
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Cw poetry the_page13

  1. 1.  They’re our signal that a text is poetry, not prose.  They can create rhythm.  They control the pace/speed of a poem.  They can emphasize words or ideas.  May contain breaks called caesuras (usually indicated by punctuation or spacing)  Can differ from line to line
  2. 2.  When people read your poem out loud, or in their heads, they will pause slightly at the end of each line.  For example: I bet you can figure out where the line breaks should be in this example: Hickory, dickory, dock the mouse ran up the clock the clock struck one and down he run hickory, dickory, dock.
  3. 3. Hickory, dickory, dock. The mouse ran up the clock. The clock struck one And down he run; Hickory, dickory, dock.
  4. 4.   Lines control the pace of the poem. Shortening or lengthening the lines can speed up or slow down the way people read. Is the following fast or slow? a wind shakes them but they won’t go oh no there goes one now. No. Power word: a break in the line that pulls the reader into the next line.
  5. 5. Crippled with desire, he questioned it. Evening upon the heights, juice of the pomegranate: who could connect it with sunlight? Crippled with desire, he questioned it. Evening upon the heights, juice of the pomegranate: who could connect it with sunlight?
  6. 6.  Arranged to emphasize and compliment the other (musical, contextual, etc.) elements of language
  7. 7.  How the poem looks on the page - Does the poem look light, delicate, with a lot of white space around the lines? Or are the lines packed solidly together?
  8. 8. William Carlos Williams’ “This Is Just to Say” in Varied Forms
  9. 9. This is just to say I have eaten the plums that were in the icebox and which you were probably saving for breakfast. Forgive me; they were delicious – so sweet and so cold. This Is Just to Say I have eaten the plums that were in the icebox and which you were probably saving for breakfast. Forgive me; they were delicious – so sweet and so cold. What’s the difference between these two poems?
  10. 10. This Is Just to Say This Is Just to Say I have eaten the plums that were in the icebox and which you were probably saving for breakfast. Forgive me; they were delicious – so sweet and so cold. I have eaten the plums that were in the icebox and which you were probably saving for breakfast Forgive me they were delicious so sweet and so cold What’s the difference between these two poems? What effect do the shorter lines have?
  11. 11.  Stanza is Italian for “room” • Think of stanzas of a poem as rooms of a house  Indicates a pause  Often coincides with the rhythm of a poem/song.  Used strictly in forms  Prevents confusion (through organization)/ boredom in readers  Poem’s form of a paragraph  Best thing? There’s no right or wrong way to divide one of your own poems.
  12. 12. This Is Just to Say This Is Just to Say I have eaten the plums that were in the icebox and which you were probably saving for breakfast Forgive me they were delicious so sweet and so cold I have eaten the plums that were in the icebox and which you were probably saving for breakfast Forgive me How do the stanza breaks influence the reading of the poem? they were delicious so sweet and so cold
  13. 13. This Is Just to Say This Is Just to Say I have eaten I have eaten the plums that were in the icebox the plums that were in the icebox and which you were probably saving and which you were probably saving for breakfast Forgive me they were delicious so sweet and so cold for breakfast Forgive me they were delicious so sweet and so cold How do the stanza breaks influence the reading of the poem?
  14. 14.  What happens when you break a line/stanza mid-sentence?
  15. 15.  Justification (left, right, center)  Font • Typeface • Size • Bold/italics/underline  Shape of poems  Tabs  Space between words
  16. 16. attack my mind with complete and utter chaos. - Ashley J.

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