Cooperation and French Collections  in Academic Libraries of North       America: CIFNAL, etc.       Heather Lea Moulaison...
Agenda• CIFNAL, its history and its structure• Some current initiatives at research libraries in  North America (samplings...
CIFNAL/ICBFN     • The Collaborative Initiative for French and North       American Libraries/ Initiative de collaboration...
Divisions of the ALA
ACRL has seventeen sections to help members individualize their ACRL experience throughspecialized programming, preconfere...
Origins of CIFNAL     • The origins of CIFNAL/ICBFN go back to an       international WESS Conference in Paris in 2004,   ...
CIFNAL origins, continued• As a result of this recommendation, an ad hoc committee was  formed and a proposal to launch th...
Finding a “home” for CIFNAL     • Center for Research Libraries (CRL) http://www.crl.edu/ ‘s Global       Resources Networ...
Center for Research Libraries                                     (CRL)Programmes des collections Programmes              ...
CIFNAL’s initial goals1. Improve access to French and French-   language resources for North American   partners as well a...
Membership in CIFNAL     • Membership in CIFNAL/ICBFN is open to institutions and individuals       who are involved in hi...
Consortial agreements     • Currently, CIFNAL has entered consortial agreements       for electronic products critical to ...
CAIRN     • Another example of a consortial agreement negotiation is CAIRN.            – “Cairn.info is a leading French l...
CIFNAL: Bibliothèque bleue project     • CIFNAL/ICBFN and ARTFL are collaborating with the Médiathèque de       l‟agglomér...
CIFNAL: Microfilm Project     • The goals of this project are to identify, locate, and       publicize the existence of ma...
CIFNAL: French Pamphlets  •   French Pamphlets: www.frenchpamphlets.org.       – For more information, visit the French Pa...
CIFNAL: Digital Library of the                   Caribbean (dLOC) •   In accordance with a memorandum of understanding bet...
Current research in French resources • Sarah Sussman (Stanford) has been   researching and analyzing information about   c...
Highlights from the Sussman study • Collections in Canada that focus on   French/francopohone works in Canada • Collection...
Canada: BAnQ • Pronounced B-A-N-Q (not “banque”) • « Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du   Québec (BAnQ), à Montréal, a...
USA: Library of Congress • « Aux États-Unis, la Bibliothèque du Congrès dispose   de remarquables collections portant sur ...
USA: La francophonie -- Africa • La plupart des bibliothèques abritant des   collections africaines de niveau recherche so...
USA: La francophonie -- Asia « D’autres bibliothèques possèdent également d’importantes collections. • L’université du Mic...
Non-location specific collections  supporting social sciences research• Collections both in and out of France in French  s...
The importance of “free”: Persée     • “A closely related service is Persée       http://www.persee.fr/web/revues/home    ...
The importance of “free”: OpenEdition     •     “Another useful service is the OpenEdition site which offers the academic ...
Nos amis les Canadiens• Synergies  http://www.synergiesca  nada.org/ is “Canadas  SSH Research  Infrastructure”  – Provide...
Hot off the presses!“An important bibliography forFrench and Francophoneresearch is now availableonline for 1991- 2010, wi...
The place of Western European   languages in US universities today• “…Western European languages and literatures  are less...
Re-engaging interest in French   resources: the Digital Humanities• Digital Humanities:  – Examples: Kolb-Proust Archives,...
Potentials for involvement• From France  – Organize a conference  – Volunteer online• From the United States  – Do a pract...
From France: Organizing• Organize your own  THATcamp for people in  Lyon: http://thatcamp.org/help/plan/
From France:               Volunteering for the dLOC • “There are many ways your expertise can   help. Whether working on ...
From North America:                 Going as a Student• Visas, housing, and networks are more simple for students   – Goin...
References and acknowledgementsReferences• Coulombe, D. (2007-8). Collaborative Initiative for French and North American L...
Questions?       Thanks you! Heather Lea Moulaisonmoulaisonhe@missouri.edu
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Cooperation and French Collections in Academic Libraries of North America: CIFNAL, etc.

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Lecture given in France at the national library school (enssib) on December 5, 2012.

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Cooperation and French Collections in Academic Libraries of North America: CIFNAL, etc.

  1. 1. Cooperation and French Collections in Academic Libraries of North America: CIFNAL, etc. Heather Lea Moulaison, PhD enssib Villeurbanne, France December 5, 2012
  2. 2. Agenda• CIFNAL, its history and its structure• Some current initiatives at research libraries in North America (samplings from the Sussman study)• Your potential for involvement
  3. 3. CIFNAL/ICBFN • The Collaborative Initiative for French and North American Libraries/ Initiative de collaboration entre les bibliothèques françaises et nord-américaines – http://www.crl.edu/grn/cifnal/index.asp – A new and important effort to enhance international cooperation among francophone and North American academic and research libraries through the exchange of ideas and resources. – Initiated by French Studies specialists of the Western European Studies Section (WESS) of the Association of College and Research Libraries Division of the American Library Association in 2005Coulombe, D. (2007-8). Collaborative Initiative for French and NorthAmerican Libraries / Initiative de collaboration entre lesbibliothèques françaises et nord-américaines (CIFNAL/ICBFN). FrenchStudies Library Group Annual Review, 4, 22-25.
  4. 4. Divisions of the ALA
  5. 5. ACRL has seventeen sections to help members individualize their ACRL experience throughspecialized programming, preconferences, discussion lists, recognition, and focusedactivities.Western European Studies Section = Section des études de l’Europe occidentaleAfrican American Studies Librarians SectionAnthropology and Sociology SectionArts SectionAsian, African, and Middle Eastern SectionCollege Libraries SectionCommunity and Junior College Libraries SectionDistance Learning SectionEducation and Behavioral Sciences SectionInstruction SectionLaw and Political Science SectionLiteratures in English SectionRare Books and Manuscripts SectionScience and Technology SectionSlavic and East European SectionUniversity Libraries SectionWomen and Gender Studies Section
  6. 6. Origins of CIFNAL • The origins of CIFNAL/ICBFN go back to an international WESS Conference in Paris in 2004, – a paper delivered by Tom Kilton – then at the University of Illinois –, entitled “A French-American Resources Project: Needs and Potentials in a World of Migration.” – Kilton’s vision was instrumental in the articulation of the concept of a GRN-based group for French resources. – Four large areas of potential collaboration were identified in his paper: 1. Collection Development and Reference 2. Bibliographic Control 3. Digital Projects 4. Document Delivery.Coulombe, D. (2007-8). Collaborative Initiative for French and NorthAmerican Libraries / Initiative de collaboration entre lesbibliothèques françaises et nord-américaines (CIFNAL/ICBFN). FrenchStudies Library Group Annual Review, 4, 22-25.
  7. 7. CIFNAL origins, continued• As a result of this recommendation, an ad hoc committee was formed and a proposal to launch this collaborative initiative was presented to the Global Resources Network at the Center for Research Libraries; this proposal was subsequently approved in 2005.• Under the leadership of the ad hoc committee a development plan and by-laws were written; the membership officially adopted them in 2007. Based on this success, an interim Steering Committee composed of Sarah G. Wenzel (chair), Tom Kilton (past chair), Jeffry Larson, Sarah Sussman, and Kati Radics, working in close partnership with James Simon, Director of International Resources, and Judy Eckoff Alspach, GRN Project Coordinator, both at CRL, have completed CIFNAL/ICBFN’s transition to a GRN-based project. A newly elected Steering
  8. 8. Finding a “home” for CIFNAL • Center for Research Libraries (CRL) http://www.crl.edu/ ‘s Global Resources Network http://www.crl.edu/grn/index.asp (GRN) is the primary supporter of CIFNAL (even thought the idea came from WESS) – The Global Resources Network, a voluntary and collaborative initiative of higher academic research institutions, is playing a key role in the expansion and enhancement of access to international scholarly resources. – Recognizing that academic and research libraries are becoming increasingly interested in providing access to international resources and in working on collaborative projects with partners worldwide, CIFNAL/ICBFN is joining similar GRN-based programs such as: • the German-North American Resources Partnership (GNARP) • the Cooperative African Newspapers Project (AFRINUL) • the Digital South Asia Library (DSAL), and • the Latin Americanist Research Resources Project (LARRP).Coulombe, D. (2007-8). Collaborative Initiative for French and NorthAmerican Libraries / Initiative de collaboration entre lesbibliothèques françaises et nord-américaines (CIFNAL/ICBFN). FrenchStudies Library Group Annual Review, 4, 22-25.
  9. 9. Center for Research Libraries (CRL)Programmes des collections Programmes Programmes d’achat du Réseau de Collections thématiques recherche Achat sur demande Études régionales Thèses du doctorat mondiale Achat proposé Achat partagé Revues de recherche (GRN) Journaux mondiaux Initiative de Project des collaboration entre les ressources Partenariat des germano – journaux africains bibliothèques (AFRINUL) françaises et nord-américaines nord-américaines (GNARP) (ICBFN/CIFNAL) Projet des Bibliothèque ressources de numérique recherche sur de l’Asie du l’Amérique Sud (DSAL) latineAssociation Internationale Francophone des Bibliothécaires Documentalistes5 août 2008 (LARRP)Le Réseau des Ressources Mondiales (du Centre des Bibliothèques de Recherche [CRL]) et le contexte de lICBFNSarah G. Wenzel (University of Chicago)
  10. 10. CIFNAL’s initial goals1. Improve access to French and French- language resources for North American partners as well as access to North American resources for French and Francophone partners, and2. Encourage collaboration between North American and Francophone establishments, endeavoring to develop connections between the collections.http://www.crl.edu/grn/cifnal
  11. 11. Membership in CIFNAL • Membership in CIFNAL/ICBFN is open to institutions and individuals who are involved in higher education and scholarly research, and are interested in participating in expanding the availability of resources relating to French and francophone studies. – Annual memberships for institutional members of CRL are currently set at $250 and $350 for non-CRL members. • There are currently 45 member institutions in North America – Individuals who work at institutions that are not institutional members may join CIFNAL by filling out the Individual Participant Agreement. There is no membership fee for Individual Members of CIFNAL. • Currently, there are 19 individual members of CIFNAL in the United States, but also elsewhere in North America, in Europe, in Africa, etc. • Further information on members: http://www.crl.edu/grn/cifnal/member-list • Membership and the participant agreement are available on the CIFNAL web site http://www.crl.edu/grn/cifnal/about-cifnal/joinCoulombe, D. (2007-8). Collaborative Initiative for French and NorthAmerican Libraries / Initiative de collaboration entre lesbibliothèques françaises et nord-américaines (CIFNAL/ICBFN). FrenchStudies Library Group Annual Review, 4, 22-25.
  12. 12. Consortial agreements • Currently, CIFNAL has entered consortial agreements for electronic products critical to the study of the French language and to conduct research on French scholarship. These include Le Grand Robert, CAIRN, and the Electronic Enlightenment. • The work of Jeffry Larson (Yale, now retired), Sebastian Hierl (Harvard), Sarah Sussman (Stanford) and James Simon (CRL) has resulted in exploring and developing consortial agreements for electronic resources. An example of such a subscription is the Grand Robert électronique. http://www.crl.edu/grn/cifnalCoulombe, D. (2007-8). Collaborative Initiative for French and NorthAmerican Libraries / Initiative de collaboration entre lesbibliothèques françaises et nord-américaines (CIFNAL/ICBFN). FrenchStudies Library Group Annual Review, 4, 22-25.
  13. 13. CAIRN • Another example of a consortial agreement negotiation is CAIRN. – “Cairn.info is a leading French language e-journal database which is highly regarded for its scholarly content. It was first developed by four leading publishing houses: Belin, De Boeck, La Découverte and Erès with the aim of improving the internet presence and distribution of scholarly journal publications for the human and social sciences. With the additional association of the Bibliothèque Nationale de France from February 2006, and later the support of such organisations as Gesval, a publishing arm of the University of Liège) and Le Centre National du Livre, it is now widely considered as a key database for francophone content in these subject areas. – “Over the years the content of Cairn has expanded from journals to magazines and e-books. The full service currently includes over 300 full text e-journals. These are sub-divided into a number of thematic collections which include law; economics; geography; history; philosophy; psychology and linguistics. • Institutions can opt to subscribe to the whole database or a range of sub-sets.Dawson, H. (2011-12). Review of Cairn.info French Studies LibraryGroup Annual Review, 8, 7-10.
  14. 14. CIFNAL: Bibliothèque bleue project • CIFNAL/ICBFN and ARTFL are collaborating with the Médiathèque de l‟agglomération troyenne (MAT http://www.mediatheque-agglo-troyes.fr ) to create a publicly accessible and searchable version of the digitized Bibliothèque bleue de Troyes. ARTFL has generously provided the initial funding for this project as well as staff resources and technical expertise. • The goals of this project will be: – A publicly accessible and searchable version of the digitized Bibliothèque bleue de Troyes. – ARTFL will build a publicly accessible version of the Bibliothèque bleue de Troyes under PhiloLogic software in Chicago. The TEI-encoded text will be also added to the ARTFL databases restricted to subscribers, allowing for comparative use and analysis. – ARTFL will share with the Médiathèque de l‟agglomération troyenne the TEI- encoded text of the Bibliothèque bleue and a copy of PhiloLogic (http://philologic.uchicago.edu/)Coulombe, D. (2007-8). Collaborative Initiative for French and NorthAmerican Libraries / Initiative de collaboration entre lesbibliothèques françaises et nord-américaines (CIFNAL/ICBFN). FrenchStudies Library Group Annual Review, 4, 22-25.
  15. 15. CIFNAL: Microfilm Project • The goals of this project are to identify, locate, and publicize the existence of major sets of microfilm pertaining to the history, culture, language and literature of France and francophone countries. • The selected microfilm resources have significant research value and reflect holdings in European and North American libraries and archives. • This list can be found on the French Microform Sets page of the WESSWeb (Western European Studies Section). • Ceres Birkhead (retired, University of Utah) was the coordinator of this project.http://www.crl.edu/grn/cifnal/current-projects/microfilm-projectCoulombe, D. (2007-8). Collaborative Initiative for French and NorthAmerican Libraries / Initiative de collaboration entre lesbibliothèques françaises et nord-américaines (CIFNAL/ICBFN). FrenchStudies Library Group Annual Review, 4, 22-25.
  16. 16. CIFNAL: French Pamphlets • French Pamphlets: www.frenchpamphlets.org. – For more information, visit the French Pamphlet Project’s Facebook page or contact Matthew Loving, Romance Languages Librarian at the University of Florida. • The Collaborative Initiative for French Language Collections (CIFNAL) is working on a new catalog of online French Pamphlets. The catalog will be a database resource able to link users to full-text, digital facsimiles of French pamphlets made accessible by CIFNAL member institutions, international partner collections, and other freely accessible digital library collections, such as the Bibliothèque Nationale de France’s Gallica collection. • A core group of interested CIFNAL members are helping to organize the project. Due the collaborative nature of the project, interested partners will be able to easily add their digitized content to the project database. • The resulting online finding aid will have the ability to link users directly into our institutional collections, improving access for scholars and researchers around the world. • Coordinator: Matthew Loving, University of Floridahttp://www.crl.edu/grn/cifnal/current-projects/french-pamphlets
  17. 17. CIFNAL: Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) • In accordance with a memorandum of understanding between CIFNAL and the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), the goal of this project is to work together to improve and increase electronic access to francophone documents. These may represent collections located in the French Caribbean or outside of the French Caribbean with a focus on this region. • Currently collaborating with the Haitian National Archives and other cultural collections in Haiti, dLOC and its francophone partners have concluded historic agreements to preserve and expand access to vital documents and materials. The success of the dLOC model is based on mutual international cooperation. CIFNAL members will bring additional linguistic and cultural assets to help dLOC reach out to new French-speaking partners. • Specifically, the two groups will work together to address needs related to: – communication, partner relations, and translation – meetings, training, fundraising, and grant writing – collection development decisions and directions – cultivation of relations with libraries and research institutes, specifically in France and the French Caribbean. • Coordinator: Matthew Loving, University of Floridahttp://www.crl.edu/grn/cifnal/current-projects/dloc
  18. 18. Current research in French resources • Sarah Sussman (Stanford) has been researching and analyzing information about current initiatives, digital libraries, and collaborations in North American academic and research libraries. • Her forthcoming article on this topic will appear in the BBF.Sussman, S. (2012). Les collections francophonesen Amérique du Nord, BBF, 57(6): 26-30.
  19. 19. Highlights from the Sussman study • Collections in Canada that focus on French/francopohone works in Canada • Collections in the United States that focus on French/francophone works in the United States • [Collections in research institutions that focus on the importance of French-language work]Sussman, S. (2012). Les collections francophonesen Amérique du Nord, BBF, 57(6): 26-30.
  20. 20. Canada: BAnQ • Pronounced B-A-N-Q (not “banque”) • « Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec (BAnQ), à Montréal, a ouvert ses portes en 2005, regroupant en une seule institution (La Grande Bibliothèque) l’ancienne Bibliothèque nationale du Québec et les Archives nationales du Québec, et devenant un des centres névralgiques de la ville. »Sussman, S. (2012). Les collections francophonesen Amérique du Nord, BBF, 57(6): 26-30.
  21. 21. USA: Library of Congress • « Aux États-Unis, la Bibliothèque du Congrès dispose de remarquables collections portant sur ces populations, leur histoire, leur culture, comme le souligne son partenariat numérique avec la BnF, « La France en Amérique, France in America », lancé en 2006. • Cette bibliothèque numérique totalement bilingue comporte des documents des deux bibliothèques nationales relatifs à la présence française dans toute l’Amérique depuis les premiers explorateurs jusqu’à la fin du XIXe siècle. »Sussman, S. (2012). Les collections francophonesen Amérique du Nord, BBF, 57(6): 26-30.
  22. 22. USA: La francophonie -- Africa • La plupart des bibliothèques abritant des collections africaines de niveau recherche sont également membres du CAMP (Cooperative Africana Materials project), le projet coopératif concernant les documents africains, fondé en 1963 sous l’égide du CRL (Center for Research Libraries). Il a mission de préserver les publications rares et les archives portant sur l’Afrique subsaharienne, et d’en favoriser l’accès 6. Il acquiert des microfilms et procède au microfilmage de documents précieux ; la numérisation de ces microfilms est en cours.Sussman, S. (2012). Les collections francophonesen Amérique du Nord, BBF, 57(6): 26-30.
  23. 23. USA: La francophonie -- Asia « D’autres bibliothèques possèdent également d’importantes collections. • L’université du Michigan s’est donnée pour mission de rassembler les documents en français provenant du Vietnam, du Cambodge, du Laos et de la Thaïlande. • L’université de Californie, à Berkeley, dispose d’une bibliothèque consacrée à l’Asie du Sud et l’Asie du Sud-Est (South and Southeast Asia Library) dotée de fonds remarquables ; par le biais d’une étroite collaboration en interne, on peut aussi trouver dans d’autres bibliothèques de cette institution des documents se rapportant à l’Asie du Sud-Est. Ces dernières s’intéressent tout particulièrement aux études indochinoises renvoyant à la période coloniale française, mais aussi à tout ouvrage scientifique en langue française consacré à l’Asie du Sud-Est. »Sussman, S. (2012). Les collections francophonesen Amérique du Nord, BBF, 57(6): 26-30.
  24. 24. Non-location specific collections supporting social sciences research• Collections both in and out of France in French support research in North America. – To provide the best service to their patrons, North American librarians are quick to take advantage of access to digital libraries and online research supporting the missions of their libraries
  25. 25. The importance of “free”: Persée • “A closely related service is Persée http://www.persee.fr/web/revues/home • This also focuses upon electronic publication in the social sciences and humanities and was initiated by Le Ministère de l’Enseignement supérieur et de la Recherche -- Direction générale de l’enseignement supérieur (MESR-DGES) in 2003 and is currently managed at l’Université Lumière Lyon 2. • It focuses on free access to historic sets of titles from academic publishers including Collections Numériques de la Sorbonne and L’Ecole des hautes etudes en sciences sociales (EHESS). • The total number of titles digitised is currently smaller [than CAIRN], but includes some extremely prestigious titles. – There are more extensive back runs of other titles (including some dating back to the 19th century) and a broader coverage of regional areas outside of Europe.Dawson, H. (2011-12). Review of Cairn.info French Studies LibraryGroup Annual Review, 8, 7-10.
  26. 26. The importance of “free”: OpenEdition • “Another useful service is the OpenEdition site which offers the academic community free access to a number of French language services. • http://www.openedition.org/ • OpenEdition is run by the Centre for Open Electronic Publishing (Cleo), a unit that brings together the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), L’Université dAix-Marseille, L’EHESS and L’Université d’Avignon et des Pays de Vaucluse. It includes three platforms : – Revues.org, which mainly focuses upon back files of academic journals. These usually operate on a rolling wall of coverage with new content being added periodically. Abstracts are provided for more recent content, with the facility for subscribers to access the full text. It currently includes 337 journal titles and 22 book series. These originate from major French university publishers, covering a broad range of social science and humanities subject areas. – Calenda is a handy calendar of forthcoming events such as conferences, courses and workshops. Users can subscribe via RSS feeds to receive continuous alerts. – Hypotheses, which links to academic blogs. Blogs are becoming increasingly important to academic publication so this resource is an excellent complement to the established academic journal articles.Dawson, H. (2011-12). Review of Cairn.info French Studies LibraryGroup Annual Review, 8, 7-10.
  27. 27. Nos amis les Canadiens• Synergies http://www.synergiesca nada.org/ is “Canadas SSH Research Infrastructure” – Provides content in the Social Sciences • In English • In French
  28. 28. Hot off the presses!“An important bibliography forFrench and Francophoneresearch is now availableonline for 1991- 2010, with thepossibility of coverage to 2012in the near future; informationis available atklostermann.deLook for a link on the left side:"E-Medien" ausführlicheInformationen zu "Klapp-Online".”This is another paid database.
  29. 29. The place of Western European languages in US universities today• “…Western European languages and literatures are less significant on many of our campuses now than 20-30 years ago, as we make room-- physically, budgetarily, in the curriculum--for programs involving increasingly important languages elsewhere in the world.” Jeffrey Garrett Associate University Librarian for Special Libraries & Director, Special Collections and Archives Northwestern University Library Wednesday, October 17, 2012 WESS-L@LISTSERV.BROWN.EDU
  30. 30. Re-engaging interest in French resources: the Digital Humanities• Digital Humanities: – Examples: Kolb-Proust Archives, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign• Conferences: The Humanities and Technology THATcamp Paris (25-26 September, 2012) (Free!) – Manifeste des Digital Humanities (2010)
  31. 31. Potentials for involvement• From France – Organize a conference – Volunteer online• From the United States – Do a practicum with a CIFNAL participant library – Find another library in the US or Canada with French collections and do an internship there
  32. 32. From France: Organizing• Organize your own THATcamp for people in Lyon: http://thatcamp.org/help/plan/
  33. 33. From France: Volunteering for the dLOC • “There are many ways your expertise can help. Whether working on collection development projects or helping assure the quality of the dLOC web site and its French language content and OCR data, there are a myriad of ways to get involved today. One of the easiest is simply to sign up for a MYdLOC account which will allow you to submit new materials online to the digital library and also add and edit metadata directly. • Please sign up today at the following address: http://www.dloc.com/ufdc/?a=dloc1&m=hmp “http://www.crl.edu/grn/cifnal/current-projects/dloc
  34. 34. From North America: Going as a Student• Visas, housing, and networks are more simple for students – Going now is the BEST time – You may never have another if you don’t go now • Your English will not get better in Lyon, at least not as dramatically• Sample ideas: – University of California – work with the Romance Languages Librarian on a CIFNAL project – Partner library schools with French collections – Look through the Sussman report in BBF and find and get help making contact with the library directly • Librarians love to talk about what they do and are flattered and overjoyed to try to find a way for foreign students to participate in their work.
  35. 35. References and acknowledgementsReferences• Coulombe, D. (2007-8). Collaborative Initiative for French and North American Libraries / Initiative de collaboration entre les bibliothèques françaises et nord-américaines (CIFNAL/ICBFN). French Studies Library Group Annual Review, 4, 22-25.• Dawson, H. (2011-12). Review of Cairn.info French Studies Library Group Annual Review, 8, 7- 10.• Sussman, S. (2012). Les collections francophones en Amérique du Nord, BBF, 57(6): 26-30.• Wenzel, S. (2008, Aug. 5). Le Réseau des Ressources Mondiales (du Centre des Bibliothèques de Recherche [CRL]) et le contexte de lICBFN, Association Internationale Francophone des Bibliothécaires Documentalistes (AIFBD). Montreal, Canada.Acknowledgements:I would like to convey a debt of gratitude to Sarah Sussman, Sarah Wenzel, and Matthew Lovingwho very willingly shared materials with me so that I could, in turn, pass them along to you. I amfrequently at a loss when I reflect on how selfless and giving librarian colleagues can be. I amlucky indeed.
  36. 36. Questions? Thanks you! Heather Lea Moulaisonmoulaisonhe@missouri.edu

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