ADEX - convencion envases 2012: hak & partners

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ADEX - convencion envases 2012: hak & partners

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ADEX - convencion envases 2012: hak & partners

  1. 1. Tecnología y tendencia en el empaque de alimentos para la Unión Europea Jan Hak CEO Hak&Partners, President GMV, Vice President, Head Emerging Markets Metropolitan Food Security
  2. 2. Peru QuaTerNes Group Selva Frozen Foods
  3. 3. Dutch Association of Manufacturers of Food Processing, Packaging and Bio-Based Systems Members cover a high percentage of total machinery production in all sectors of the industry: fruit, vegetables, feed, meat, fish, dairy, bio-based products, etc. Member of: • FPME (Food Processing Machinery Europe) • Europama (European Committee of the National Associations of Packaging Machinery Manufacturers) • Copama (International Confederation of Packaging Machinery Associations)
  4. 4. The Netherlands: ‘Food Technology Valley’ Home country of world leading companies in food technology Turn-over 2011: EUR 3,5 billion in food processing and packaging systems research of which 42% outside the EU (80% poultry, 70% cheese and > 50% potato processing systems)
  5. 5. Metropolitan Food Security Twice as Much Food, Twice the Quality, Half the Resources Platform for sectors: Water - Agri-Food - Horticulture (T + U) Market driven, result oriented initiative • With: Holistic approach on Consumer Acceptance • Involving: Logistics, Cleantech, Pharma and Bio-based Products • Enabled by: ICT and Hi-Tech
  6. 6. Metropolitan Food Security The World is globalizing
  7. 7. Metropolitan Food Security More people, Less land Agricultural land (1,000 ha)Global population (in millions) - 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 7,000 8,000 9,000 10,000 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 2050 Total population Rural population Urban population 0.50 0.75 1.00 1.25 1.50 4,200 4,300 4,400 4,500 4,600 4,700 4,800 4,900 5,000 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2007 Agricultural land area Agricultural land area per capita Source: FAO Stat, Rabobank
  8. 8. Metropolitan Food Security Economic growth (2010-2025) for 75% comes from emerging economies Economic growth (2010-2025) comes for 82% of large cities Source: MC Kinsey Global Institute, June 2012
  9. 9. Population (millions) GDP (billions of U.S. dollars) Rank City Country 2010 2025 2010 2025 Total Growth % Growth 1 Shanghai China 22.3 30.9 250.7 1,112.2 861.5 344 2 Beijing China 18.8 29.6 206.2 1,027.9 821.7 398 3 Tianjin China 11.1 15.2 128.8 624.4 495.7 385 4 São Paulo Brazil 19.7 23.2 437.3 912.9 475.7 109 5 Guangzhou China 11.1 14.9 146.1 573.0 426.9 292 66 Lima Peru 9.2 11.8 77.3 184.7 107.3 139 The Most Dynamic Cities of 2025 Ranked by projected absolute GDP growth 2012-2025 at predicted real exchange rates. Source: McKinsey Global Institute Cityscope
  10. 10. Metropolitan Food Security Changing Consumption 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1964 - 1966 1997 - 1999 2030 Per capita meat consumption (kg/year) 0 50 100 150 200 250 1964 - 1966 1997 - 1999 2030 Per capita milk consumption (kg/year) World Developing countries Industrialized countries Transition countries Source: World Health Organization
  11. 11. Metropolitan Food Security Growing meat demand, move to poultry 11 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Turkey Beef Pork Broiler 1,000 tonnes Broiler CAGR: +9.7% Pork CAGR: +7.0% Beef CAGR: +3.8% Broiler CAGR: +2.0% Pork CAGR: -7.0% Beef CAGR: -8.8% Meat: CAGR: -6.0% Meat: CAGR: +6.4% 28% 34% 36% 12% 35% 53% Transformation years Rebuilding years Economic crisis CAGR: +2.9% CAGR: +1.4% CAGR: -2.2% CAGR: +0.9% Russian Meat Market: 1990 - 2012
  12. 12.  WHAT Calories  "experience"  nutrition & health, variety  WHEN Regular  grazing and snacking  WHERE In-home  out-of-home  WITH WHOM Social  individual  HOW PREPARED From scratch  ready-to-eat, heat and eat Function of Food
  13. 13. Needing social cohesion (and safety)  Especially older generation  In more individualistic world Increasing suspicion (decreasing authority)  Especially young generation  Towards: institutions, banks, large corporations (According to Wim Lageweg, MVO -2011) Trends in European society
  14. 14. Needing “Roots and Wings” (and origin)  Especially cultural ‘’creatives’’, self determination  Regional identify, interest in origin and process Stressing sustainability  Especially awareness of scarcity Increasing transparency  Especially sharing knowledge  Pressure on media, social media Trends in European society (According to Wim Lageweg, MVO -2011)
  15. 15. Requirements Purchasing power of retailers Very short lead times High service levels 7 day supply Quality / food standards Competition Pressure Increased use of EDI Support wide range of products Shorter shelf life products Reduction in additives Bio & Green Product traceability Market/Chain Requirements Integrated systems structure Variable batch sizes Effluent / waste reduction Lowest cost production Just in time operation Pressure Forecasts of requirements Reduced dependency on people Plant flexibility High speed changeovers Scheduling production and maintenance Product recovery systems Detailed records of operations Operations/Packaging
  16. 16. Function Structure Form Integration of LIFE CYCLES Integrated scope Techniques ICT ProductionDesign Use Traditional scope Integration of DISCIPLINES Integration of ABSTRACTIONS Recycle Economics Integrated approach to product, process and packaging development
  17. 17. Indispensable Benefits of Food Packaging  Protection  Freshness  Sensory appeal  Portability  Convenience  Differentiation  Performance  Time saving  Channel growth  Communication  Relevance  Esteem  Equity enhancement
  18. 18. Key trends enabled by packaging:  Nutrition / Health  Flavor  Convenience  Value  Variety  Fun  Time  Affordable luxury  Security and Authenticity  Quality  Sustainability and Environment
  19. 19. Examples from the potato value chain: Create more added value  Healthier, convenience Distinguish yourself  More variations (functional, organic, exceptional)  Competition (new packaging ideas, developments on shop floor) Reach new customers  Consumer groups
  20. 20.  French fries Smaller portions, focus on preparation other than frying, new frying technologies  Potato chips Smaller packages, baked, reduced in fat, light Health and Nutrition Less fat and calories
  21. 21.  Sodium Less, offer sachets  Acrylamide Lighter fries, changes in frying process, less potato ingredients (extruded snacks), enzymes Health and Nutrition Sodium and Acrylamide
  22. 22.  Supply chain integration  Low carbon footprint  Local sourcing of Potatoes  “Controlled” potato cultivation  Reduction in use of pesticides  Organic potato products  New varieties (resistance) Energy and Environment
  23. 23. Trends to watch 1. Functionality and Sustainability Finding the balance 2. Sustainable Packaging Focus on recyclability 3. Paper-based Packaging Keep the Molecule in Play 4. Stand-up Pouches Maximum Flexibility, Sustainability and Convenience 5. The Development of Bio-plastics A viable eco-friendly solution?
  24. 24. 1. Functionality and Sustainability Aim: Finding the balance between under-packaging and over-packaging • Packaging prevents food waste • Saves resources • Part of solution for an overall resource efficient society • Facilitating sustainable lifestyles
  25. 25. 2. Sustainable Packaging • Concern about personal impact on environment • Demand for "green" packaging":  recycled content  re-usable  degradable
  26. 26. 3. Paper-based Packaging Wax is out • Wax replacement packaging • Water based technologies • Reducing landfill costs, boasting recycling levels
  27. 27. 4. Stand-up Pouches Maximum Flexibility, Sustainability and Convenience • Replacing ridged containers • Reducing landfill costs, boasting recycling levels
  28. 28. 5. The Development of Bio-plastics - What’s in the name? Distinction between: Bio-based, compostable, biodegradable, etc.
  29. 29. Final Remarks: 1. Freshness 2. New Technologies
  30. 30. 1. Freshness  Packaging differentiation by "Green" aspects  Innovator: Best practices in fresh produce  Freshness Phobia  (Organic) Freshness  Intelligent and active packaging
  31. 31. 2. New Technologies • Pulse Electric Field (PEF) For liquid products like juice, milk, soup High voltage pulses, lengthens storage life • High Pressure Conservation Ultra High Pressure (UHP) For products that has to be sterilized or pasteurized Pressure up to 1,000 MPa Disables micro-organisms and enzymes • Cold Plasma Cold gases with electrical charge disinfect the surface of packaging
  32. 32. Netherlands Agro & Food Technology Center, South America
  33. 33. Metropolitan Food SecurityMetropolitan Food Security Goals  Peru – Dutch Cooperation Business and Academia  Create New Business Opportunities and Stimulating Entrepreneurship  Jointly Securing Food for Urbanized Areas  Spin-off: Effects in Innovations in Science, Technology, Education, Training and Know-how Transfer
  34. 34. 1. People 2. Professionals 3. Plan 4. Pro-active 5. Performance 6. Planet 7. Prosperity Strategy to Success - 7 P’s:
  35. 35. Más información: www.quaternes.nl - Pabellón Holanda: 5C Gracias!

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