MHC general information

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Listen to basic introductory inforamtion about MHC and the immune system.

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MHC general information

  1. 1. Major Histocompatibility Complex MHC introduction
  2. 2. What are MHCs? <ul><li>Normal cell surface proteins produced by most cells. </li></ul><ul><li>They are like ID tags for cells. </li></ul><ul><li>They are involved in allowing T cells to recognize self vs. nonself. </li></ul>
  3. 3. What do MHCs do? <ul><li>MHCs bind to peptide fragments (parts of chopped up proteins) and display/present them on the surface of the cell. </li></ul><ul><li>The T cells monitor the MHCs for evidence of an invasion of a cell or for foreign cells </li></ul><ul><li>*B cells do not interact with MHCs. </li></ul>
  4. 4. What types of MHCs exist? <ul><li>Class I MHC molecules </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Found on almost all nucleated cells (not RBCs) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bonds to portions of antigens (peptide fragments) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Presents them on the cell surface. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cytotoxic T cells can recognize and begin specific defense </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. What types of MHCs exist? <ul><li>Class II MHC molecules </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Found on dendritic cells, macrophages, & B cells (aka Antigen-presenting cells) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bonds to portions of antigens (peptide fragments) that have been ingested and broken down. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Presents them on the cell surface. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Helper T cells can recognize and begin specific defense </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Dendritic Cell
  7. 7. Macrophage
  8. 8. Macrophages
  9. 9. Are my MHCs similar to others? <ul><li>There are many different alleles for MHCs. </li></ul><ul><li>Most of us are heterozygous for all of our MHCs and therefore unique (except identical twins). </li></ul>
  10. 10. Class I MHC

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