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East Hill Infill Presentation

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narrative and drawings for East Hill Infill Project in Vernon BC

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East Hill Infill Presentation

  1. 1. Sustainable Design—The project is part of the CAGBC’s LEED for homes Pilot program. The certification process under the East Hill Infill USGBC’s LEED for homes rating system is in the final stages. A platinum rating is projected. ID Innovation and Design - 2 of 11 possible points LL Location and Linkages -10 of 10 SS Sustainable Sites -18 of 22 WE Water Efficiency -11 of 15 EA Energy and Atmosphere - 23 of 38 MR Materials and Resources -11 of 16 EQ Indoor Enviro Quality -14 of 21 AE Awareness and Education 2 of 3 Simplicity_Adaptability– The simplicity of the basic parti – light stick framing suspended between insulated concrete walls (party/ party or exposure / party) – anticipates extrapolation into 3 -plex, 4-plex and row housing arrangements. A variety of Executive Summary roof forms and inclinations can accommodate the requirements of solar collectors or photovoltaic panels particular to the site. The clear span structure will allow for plan variations in design or for adaptive re-use without the need for structural East Hill is a centrally located residential neighborhood within walking modification distance of downtown Vernon, BC. The majority of the neighborhood consists of single family homes constructed between 1950 and 1985, but there remain many heritage homes dating from the early part of the century. Vernon’s official community plan recognizes the impor- tance of sustainability including increased densities close to the Cities’ core. The East Hill Infill project is a model for the potential infill of this neighborhood. The building’s design was influenced by three key considerations. It would be designed using sustainable principles and features; it would have simplicity in its construction and detailing and it would be adapt- able to different configuration of use and form; finally it would estab- lish continuity with the heritage character of the neighbourhood. Continuity- There are many early century craftsman style houses in the East Hill neighborhood. These homes are consistent in their raised floors, wide stairs leading from the street, linear covered porches, and the horizontal datum that they estab- lish. Finish materials consist primarily of wood plank and shingle with some board and batten in evidence. The East Hill Infill responds to these features without sentimentality and without sacrificing its own uniqueness as a ‘green’ home hugh j bitz, architect
  2. 2. Light (2x6@24” centre) framed walls were used on the south and north elevations where larger opening and greater transparency was desired. A soya based closed cell spray foam with recycled fiber (Polar East Hill Infill Foam) was applied to the exterior framed walls resulting in an R value of 35. Polar Foam was also used to insulate floors suspended over unheated space, increasing the R value over traditional ‘batt’ insulation while also mitigating the thermal bypass (air gap) between insulation and heated space. Made to measure pre-engineered joists and beams where used throughout. These assemblies contributed to an estimated 60% reduction in construction waste. Finally, the extra deep roof trusses specified allowed for a vented roof with combined R59 batt with . The flat roof allows for the future provision of solar collectors or photo- voltaic panels. Triple glazed windows and double glazed doors with argon filled spaces and low e coatings add to the thermal performance. Energy conservation will be further realized by the exclusive use of en- ergy star rated appliances and fixtures Water conservation is critically important in the semi arid Okanagan and the project responds by using 93% of the roof area to harvest rainwater. This water will be stored in 1800 gal storage tanks buried be- hind each unit to feed the drip irrigation system. To reduce the overall irrigation demand drought tolerant plants are used exclusively. Water conservation is further enhanced indoors by using very high efficiency fittings and fixtures. Interior finishes were selected for their renewability, durability and low VOC content. Flooring consists of bamboo hardwood and green label wool carpet . Casework is made entirely from FSC certified wood. Clay based paint and finishing system were used throughout the interior. Sustainable Design Simplicity -Adaptability The simplicity of the basic parti – light stick framing suspended between insulated concrete walls (party/ The infill replaces a neglected 1100 sq.ft. 1950’s era home with a duplex that realizes a fivefold increase party or exposure / party) – anticipates extrapolation into 3 -plex, 4-plex and row housing arrangements. in conditioned floor area while increasing the site coverage by just over half that. Local bylaws required A variety of roof forms and inclinations can accommodate the requirements of solar collectors or photo- that each unit have onsite parking for two cars. Without alley access the only option was to park in the voltaic panels orientation particular to the site. The clear span structure will allow for plan variations in front yard. An at- grade garage or parking area would have cut the units off from the street and forced a design or for adaptive re-use without the need for structural modification. On the main floor, a street larger footprint. The decision to partially raise the main floor and park under the house allows each unit related ‘flex’ space with separate entrance and en-suite washroom anticipates a home based business, but a 1,300 sq.ft. back yard and results in a more open and immediate relation to the street. This relation- will serve equally well as a family room or extra bedroom. This ensuite is designed to accommodate per- ship - in the form of the porch - allows people to participate in the public domain of the street. By incor- sons with limited mobility and an adjacent area has been roughed in to allow the laundry function to be porating the porch element into the design the pedestrian based nature of the neighborhood is rein- move downstairs. This will allow elderly occupants to spend most of their day on the main floor avoiding forced and the stage is set for re-establishing a community based relationship that the automobile has stairs. The unfinished basement allows for a future self contained suite but will satisfy a number of other made obsolete. A further result of this decision is the access to natural light /ventilation in the condi- uses. tioned space behind the garage . Although bylaws currently prohibit secondary suites the design antici- pates and allows for the possibility of a self contained suite in this space (lower floor/A2). Four families may potentially dwell where one occupied before. Continuity The units are heated and cooled with a ground source heat pump that includes heat recovery. A de- There are many early century craftsman style houses in the East Hill neighborhood. These homes are con- superheater provides for domestic hot water. Despite this relatively low energy form of space condition- sistent in their raised floors, wide stairs leading from the street, linear covered porches, and the horizontal ing, the design also encourages natural ventilation and conditioning by the careful placement of oper- datum that they establish. Finish materials consist primarily of wood plank and shingle with some board able windows at either end of an axis interconnected via an open stair feature (section B/A3). Openings and batten in evidence. The east hill infill responds to these features without sentimentality and without on the southern exposure are protected from the summer sun by the porch and shading pergola while sacrificing its own uniqueness as a ‘green’ home. Cementatious fibre ( Hardie) siding was selected over allowing the sun to penetrate deep into the space in other seasons. On the second floor, light pipes wood because of its durability. Wood trim is used discretely in more protected areas and where they are allow natural lighting of interior washrooms. ‘within touch’ The wall and roof assemblies were considered for their thermal performance and efficiency of use. Insu- lated concrete forms (ICF) walls are used on the load bearing axis’ where openings are limited (exposure wall) or absent (party wall). The concrete provides superior stability, i.e. no shrinkage, and durability over framed walls. The layout of walls and openings (west elevation/A4) allowed for the whole or half block modules so that no cutting was required. There was no waste from these forms. In addition ICF walls have an R value of 22.7 and no thermal bridging - which effectively increases their performance over that value. The mass of the concrete provides some modulation to temperature swings hugh j bitz, architect
  3. 3. hugh j bitz, architect hugh j bitz, MAIBC, P.Eng, LEED AP
  4. 4. hugh j bitz, architect hugh j bitz, MAIBC, P.Eng, LEED AP
  5. 5. hugh j bitz, architect hugh j bitz, MAIBC, P.Eng, LEED AP
  6. 6. hugh j bitz, architect hugh j bitz, MAIBC, P.Eng, LEED AP
  7. 7. hugh j bitz, architect hugh j bitz, MAIBC, P.Eng, LEED AP

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