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Ihr dig hist_teachingpanel_feb2020

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IHR Digital History Seminar 4 February 2020

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Ihr dig hist_teachingpanel_feb2020

  1. 1. IHR Digital History Seminar - Tuesday 4 February 2020 Digital History in the Classroom: Panel Discussion Clare Rowan (Warwick), Rob Houghton (Winchester), James Baker (Sussex)
  2. 2. History, Digital Storytelling, and Wikipedia Clare Rowan @ancient_tokens
  3. 3. Lets begin with a story…. • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LiqqoeCj Txo
  4. 4. Centre for Digital Storytelling (CDS) • Personal • Authentic • Controlled by the storyteller • Short (2-3 min) format with recorded voiceover, still images, enhanced with subtle special effects. • http://www.storycenter.org/
  5. 5. Reasons • Second Year Core Module: The Hellenistic World • Horrors of the ‘silent seminar’ • Additional ‘transferable skills’ (e.g. copyright knowledge)
  6. 6. Practicalities • 2x2 hour seminars (‘story circles’ and storyboarding + video software) • Audacity + Wevideo • group work
  7. 7. Impact and Challenges • Now optional form of assessment for Term 2 (individual) • Latin podcast • Trailers, etc for other events • Power of storytelling for careers/funding/museu m work, etc • Student skills greater than mine! • Having to explain how to ‘do’ group work • Group failures • Constant struggle for software • Office as recording studio • Being the only one in the department to run it
  8. 8. Wikipedia • First year Introduction to Roman History module (Republic) • Focus on historiography, prosopography (Roman Republic) • Foster independence and critical thought, idea of independence as a practicing historian • Women’s Classical Committee • To think more critically about Wikipedia and the internet as a source
  9. 9. And one final story…. • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p- k183BKWKo
  10. 10. Digital Gaming in the Classroom Dr Robert Houghton Robert.Houghton@winchester.ac.uk @RobEHoughton
  11. 11. Computer Games
  12. 12. Serious Games
  13. 13. Games as Education
  14. 14. Formative Impact (Houghton, 2016; Beavers, 2019)
  15. 15. Structure Digital Gaming in the Classroom Limitations Making Better History Games
  16. 16. Part I: Digital Gaming the Classroom
  17. 17. Understanding Popular History
  18. 18. What Can I Do with a History Degree?
  19. 19. Understanding History: Time Historians (Martínez, 2020) @SussexHumsLab
  20. 20. Introducing Periods, Themes, Regions
  21. 21. Presenting Physical Environments and Material Culture
  22. 22. Exploration of Historical Arguments (McCall, 2014, 2018) @gamingthepast
  23. 23. Interrogation of Arguments (Wainwright, 2014; Ortega, 2015)
  24. 24. Creation of Counter-Arguments (Kee and Graham, 2014)
  25. 25. Part II: Limitations
  26. 26. Cost
  27. 27. Skillset
  28. 28. Transparency
  29. 29. Part III: Overcoming the Shortcomings
  30. 30. Physical Games
  31. 31. Playing the Past: Making Better History Games for Learning and Research
  32. 32. The Investiture Contest
  33. 33. Digital Gaming in the Classroom Dr Robert Houghton Robert.Houghton@winchester.ac.uk @RobEHoughton
  34. 34. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Exceptions: quotations, embeds from external sources, logos, marked images, slides marked with an alternative licence. Programming Historians at Sussex James Baker Senior Lecturer in Digital History and Archives University of Sussex + Sussex Humanities Lab
  35. 35. @j_w_baker Basics Year 1 One hour per week Part of Core modules Lecture Slot Indirect assessment
  36. 36. @j_w_baker
  37. 37. @j_w_baker Sussex Digital History* Autumn – Doing History in the Digital Age What is History Reading History Writing History Referencing History Library Search Searching for History Interfaces to History Archiving History Organising History Sources of History *currently on sabbatical until next academic year!
  38. 38. @j_w_baker Sussex Digital History* Spring – Doing Digital History Data Modelling Making historical data I (theory) Making historical data II (practice) Digitising historical data I (theory) Digitising historical data II (practice) Visualising historical data I (theory) Visualising historical data II (practice: graphs) Visualising historical data III (practice: maps) Storing and preserving historical data What is Digital History? *currently on sabbatical until next academic year!
  39. 39. @j_w_baker Headline findings after ~4 years! Students like practical Peer learning helps manage mass practicals Students like learning history Primary sources are a perfect hook Students like learning about historical practice Students dislike titles that look like maths/stats Students have hugely varying skill levels Handouts are your friend You learn about the assumptions students (and colleagues) make about ‘digital’ and ‘skills’ It does sink in
  40. 40. @j_w_baker programminghistorian.org Students like practical ✓ Peer learning helps manage mass practicals ❌ Students like learning history ✓ Primary sources are a perfect hook ✓ Students like learning about historical practice ❌ Students dislike titles that look like maths/stats ❌ Students have hugely varying skill levels ? Handouts are your friend ✓ You learn about the assumptions students (and colleagues) make about ‘digital’ and ‘skills’ ❌ It does sink in ❌
  41. 41. @j_w_baker programminghistorian.org
  42. 42. @j_w_baker programminghistorian.org Students like practical ✓ Peer learning helps manage mass practicals ❌ Students like learning history ✓ Primary sources are a perfect hook ✓ Students like learning about historical practice ❌ Students dislike titles that look like maths/stats ❌ Students have hugely varying skill levels ? Handouts are your friend ✓ You learn about the assumptions students (and colleagues) make about ‘digital’ and ‘skills’ ❌ It does sink in ❌
  43. 43. @j_w_baker programminghistorian.org
  44. 44. @j_w_baker programminghistorian.org Students like practical ✓ Peer learning helps manage mass practicals ❌ Students like learning history ✓ Primary sources are a perfect hook ✓ Students like learning about historical practice ❌ Students dislike titles that look like maths/stats ❌ Students have hugely varying skill levels ? Handouts are your friend ✓ You learn about the assumptions students (and colleagues) make about ‘digital’ and ‘skills’ ❌ It does sink in ❌
  45. 45. @j_w_baker programminghistorian.org
  46. 46. @j_w_baker programminghistorian.org Students like practical ✓ Peer learning helps manage mass practicals ❌ Students like learning history ✓ Primary sources are a perfect hook ✓ Students like learning about historical practice ❌ Students dislike titles that look like maths/stats ❌ Students have hugely varying skill levels ? Handouts are your friend ✓ You learn about the assumptions students (and colleagues) make about ‘digital’ and ‘skills’ ❌ It does sink in ❌
  47. 47. @j_w_baker programminghistorian.org
  48. 48. @j_w_baker programminghistorian.org Students like practical ✓ Peer learning helps manage mass practicals ❌ Students like learning history ✓ Primary sources are a perfect hook ✓ Students like learning about historical practice ❌ Students dislike titles that look like maths/stats ❌ Students have hugely varying skill levels ? Handouts are your friend ✓ You learn about the assumptions students (and colleagues) make about ‘digital’ and ‘skills’ ❌ It does sink in ❌
  49. 49. @j_w_baker programminghistorian.org Visualizing Data with Bokeh and Pandas Using JavaScript to Create Maps of Correspondence Using Gazetteers to Extract Sets of Keywords from Free-Flowing Texts Geocoding Historical Data using QGIS
  50. 50. @j_w_baker programminghistorian.org Students like practical ✓ Peer learning helps manage mass practicals ❌ Students like learning history ✓ Primary sources are a perfect hook ✓ Students like learning about historical practice ❌ Students dislike titles that look like maths/stats ❌ Students have hugely varying skill levels ? Handouts are your friend ✓ You learn about the assumptions students (and colleagues) make about ‘digital’ and ‘skills’ ❌ It does sink in ❌
  51. 51. @j_w_baker programminghistorian.org
  52. 52. @j_w_baker programminghistorian.org Students like practical ✓ Peer learning helps manage mass practicals ❌ Students like learning history ✓ Primary sources are a perfect hook ✓ Students like learning about historical practice ❌ Students dislike titles that look like maths/stats ❌ Students have hugely varying skill levels ? Handouts are your friend ✓ You learn about the assumptions students (and colleagues) make about ‘digital’ and ‘skills’ ❌ It does sink in ❌
  53. 53. @j_w_baker programminghistorian.org
  54. 54. @j_w_baker Questions What is easy? What is hard? Is critical too negative? Are clear tutorials too positive? Where should we invest?
  55. 55. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Exceptions: quotations, embeds from external sources, logos, marked images, slides marked with an alternative licence. Programming Historians at Sussex James Baker Senior Lecturer in Digital History and Archives University of Sussex + Sussex Humanities Lab

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