Session 2 Power Point

360 views

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
360
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
10
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Session 2 Power Point

  1. 1. Session 2: Emergency Management: Past, Present, & Future <ul><li>Need to understand public management as the context for emergency management </li></ul><ul><li>What is EM and why do we need it? </li></ul><ul><li>How EM emerged </li></ul><ul><li>EM in the public sector: key organizations and functions </li></ul><ul><li>Major changes underway </li></ul>
  2. 2. Emergency Management in the U.S. <ul><li>Basic characteristics of the American federal system </li></ul><ul><li>Role and functions of each level of gov’t </li></ul><ul><li>Role of the President </li></ul><ul><li>Interest groups and public policy </li></ul><ul><li>Public sector involvement in EM </li></ul>
  3. 3. EM at the Federal Level <ul><li>Variety of authorities, agencies, and response plans </li></ul><ul><li>Main categories: natural hazards; industrial/technological threats; and human- induced, including terrorism </li></ul><ul><li>History of federal involvement and trends re centralization of EM </li></ul>
  4. 4. Major Federal Response Plans <ul><li>The National Contingency Plan (NCP) </li></ul><ul><li>The Federal Response Plan (FRP), including the Terrorism Annex; and </li></ul><ul><li>The Concept of Operations Plan (CONPLAN) </li></ul><ul><li>Other plans exist for telecommunications, immigration, and other emergencies. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Lessons Learned About EM <ul><li>Experiential knowledge is documented by practitioners and by researchers; an on-going endeavor </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: </li></ul><ul><li>Importance of CEM </li></ul><ul><li>Value of Mitigation </li></ul><ul><li>Planning and Preparedness pay off </li></ul><ul><li>Difficulties of sustaining interest, and </li></ul><ul><li>commitment </li></ul>
  6. 6. Past Disasters as Milestones <ul><li>Major disasters often result in significant changes in law, policies, organizations, and processes regarding emergency management </li></ul><ul><li>Changes may be made at all levels and in all sectors, if response and recovery went badly </li></ul><ul><li>Some past events are “focusing events” that have a variety of outcomes, some of which lead to new and better ways to do EM in the future. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Some Milestone Events <ul><li>Exxon Valdez Oil Spill (1988) – led to major changes in the NCP and in the National Response System. </li></ul><ul><li>Hurricane Andrew (1992) – led to major changes in the FRP and at FEMA. </li></ul><ul><li>World Trade Center attack (2001) – led to major organizational changes, including the formation of the Office and then Dept. of Homeland Security. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Dept. of Homeland Security <ul><li>Triggering incidents were the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks </li></ul><ul><li>Preceded by the Office of H.S. in the Exec. Office of the President (Oct.2001- March 2003) </li></ul><ul><li>Enabling legislation dated Nov. 25, 2002; actual creation of the dept. will occur in 2003 </li></ul><ul><li>Largest federal reorganization in more than 50 years: 22 agencies and 170,000 personnel are involved </li></ul>
  9. 9. Homeland Security References <ul><li>Dept. of Homeland Security ( www.dhs.gov ) </li></ul><ul><li>State level departments of H.S. ( www.nga.org ) </li></ul><ul><li>Local level information ( www.iaem.com ) </li></ul><ul><li>Anser ( www.answer.com ) </li></ul><ul><li>Govexec.com ( www.govexec.com ) </li></ul>

×