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How to Prevent An Active Shooter in Your Workplace

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In this presentation, you'll learn about:
-Prevention and early intervention
-Attack-related behaviors
-Assessing potential threats
-Creating a workplace violence prevention policy

Published in: Business
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How to Prevent An Active Shooter in Your Workplace

  1. 1. MANAGING THREATS ASSOCIATED WITH TARGETED VIOLENCE AND THE ACTIVE SHOOTER
  2. 2. Why We’re Here: Protecting the Workplace HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters2
  3. 3. Employers must maintain “a place of employment which is free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm ...” OSHA/MOSHA HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters3 PROTECTING THE WORKPLACE: A TOP PRIORITY
  4. 4. HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters Family of Navy Yard shooting victim files $37.5 million wrongful-death claim • Suit alleged the Navy and the Department of Veterans Affairs overlooked or missed a series of red flags that should have alerted them to the troubled history of the shooter. • The action could inspire other victims’ families to seek legal advice or file lawsuits. 4 PROTECTING THE WORKPLACE: A NEW RISK
  5. 5. Common corporate “roadblocks” to workplace violence prevention HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters5 PROTECTING THE WORKPLACE: OVERCOMING THE BARRIERS • Lack of awareness about the “knowable” indicators of a potential attack • Poor understanding of risk and mitigation measures • Absence an targeted violence prevention strategy • Shortfalls in policy creation and training, sustained executive sponsorship and sufficient security-related funding
  6. 6. Prevention and Early Intervention To manage threats associated with targeted violence and the active shooter, we must first gain an understanding of the factors that may indicate potential risk. HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters6 PROTECTING THE WORKPLACE: A PROTECTIVE APPROACH
  7. 7. HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters Know Your Enemy: Threat Assessment and Protective Intelligence 7
  8. 8. HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters Targeted Violence is any incident of violence where a known or knowable attacker selects a particular target prior to their violent attack. 8 WHAT IS TARGETED VIOLENCE?
  9. 9. MYTH 1: They fit a distinct profile MYTH 2: Mentally ill attackers are irrational in their planning MYTH 3: They make a direct threat FACT 1: Attackers do not fit one descriptive or demographic profile. FACT 2: Mentally ill attackers have developed organized and rational attack plans. FACT 3: Persons who pose an actual threat most often do not make a threat. 9 WHAT WE HAVE LEARNED ABOUT ATTACKERS HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters
  10. 10. HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters Attackers have motives • Achieve fame and notoriety • Law-enforcement- assisted suicide • Bring national attention to a perceived problem 10 WHAT WE HAVE LEARNED ABOUT ATTACKERS Attackers select targets • Based on their motives and the accessibility of the target • Often consider more than one target Attackers have common backgrounds • Despair - depression - suicidal thoughts • History of harassing or stalking • Major loss or change in life • Few arrests for violent crimes
  11. 11. HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters What are “attack-related behaviors”? • Interest or obsession with violence • Develop attack plan • Approach or visit site of attack • Attempted assault or actual attack • Attempt to penetrate security • Approach or visit site with weapon 11 WHAT WE HAVE LEARNED ABOUT ATTACKERS
  12. 12. HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters The pre-attack process is an understandable, often discernible process of thinking and behavior • Stems from an interaction among the potential attacker, past stressful events, a current situation and the target • Often brings clear signs of propensity towards violence that signal a potential attacker’s intentions • The attacker’s thinking, planning and logistical preparations must be detected and interrupted 12 UNDERSTANDING AND ADDRESSING THE RISK
  13. 13. Assess potential threats from the outside looking in • Always remember that the question at the core of a threat assessment is not “Has the subject made a threat?” but “Does the subject pose a threat?” • Investigations are behavior-based rather than statement-based • Information sharing is key to prevention HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters13 UNDERSTANDING AND ADDRESSING THE RISK
  14. 14. HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters Potential workplace violence situations can happen at any time of the day or night. Every company must make it their mission to prevent such incidents from occurring by ensuring that all reports of potential workplace violence are investigated and documented in an effective and consistent manner. 14 UNDERSTANDING AND ADDRESSING THE RISK
  15. 15. Workplace Violence includes but is not limited to physical violence, threats or threatening behavior communicated through verbal, written, electronic or physical means. 15 UNDERSTANDING AND ADDRESSING THE RISK HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters
  16. 16. Ensure a Workplace Violence Prevention Policy is in place To provide guidance to employees on preventing acts of workplace violence, your policy should cover five key areas: • Identifying Prohibited Behaviors • Courtesy, Respect and Safety • Zero Tolerance • Action and Enforcement • Notification of Protective and Restraining Orders 16 UNDERSTANDING AND ADDRESSING THE RISK HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters
  17. 17. Prohibited Behaviors • Causing physical injury • Making threatening remarks • Exhibiting aggressive or hostile behavior that creates a reasonable fear of injury • Stalking, threatening, harassing anyone while on the job or with the use of the organization’s resources • Intentionally damaging employer property or property of another employee • Possession of a weapon while on company property or while on company business 17 WORKPLACE VIOLENCE PREVENTION POLICY HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters 1. Identify Prohibited Behaviors
  18. 18. Code of Conduct All employees – including supervisors and temporary employees - customers, vendors and guests will treat each other with courtesy and respect at all times and maintain a safe working environment. 18 WORKPLACE VIOLENCE PREVENTION POLICY HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters 2. Courtesy, Respect and Safety
  19. 19. Zero Tolerance • Prohibits harassment, intimidation, threats and disruptive behavior that causes fear and acts of violence. • Prohibits retaliation against an employee who reports incidents of workplace violence. • Prohibits knowingly and intentionally submitting false claims of workplace violence. 19 WORKPLACE VIOLENCE PREVENTION POLICY HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters 3. Zero Tolerance
  20. 20. Be Proactive • Investigate all reports of workplace violence • Train specific individuals who will be responsible for the assessment and management of workplace violence investigations • Violation of this policy will lead to disciplinary action 20 WORKPLACE VIOLENCE PREVENTION POLICY HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters 4. Action and Enforcement
  21. 21. Be Aware All individuals who apply for or obtain a protective or restraining order must provide Security with a copy. 21 WORKPLACE VIOLENCE PREVENTION POLICY HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters 5. Notification of Protective or Restraining Orders
  22. 22. HILLARD HEINTZE © 2015 | Protecting What Matters • A history of threats or violent acts, including threats or violence occurring during employment. • Propensity to use violence to project power, control others or respond to stress or conflict. • Threats, bullying or other threatening behavior. • Aggressive outbursts or comments. 22 WORKPLACE VIOLENCE PREVENTION • Excessive displays of anger. • Verbal abuse or harassment by any means or medium. • Harboring grudges. • Inability to handle criticism, habitually making excuses and blaming others. Learn to identify behaviors of concern
  23. 23. HILLARD HEINTZE © 2015 | Protecting What Matters23 WORKPLACE VIOLENCE PREVENTION • Chronic, unsubstantiated complaints about persecution or injustice (a “victim mindset”) • Obsessive intrusion upon others or persistent unwanted romantic pursuit. • Erratic, impulsive or bizarre behavior that has generated fear among co-workers. • Suicidal or homicidal thoughts or ideas. • High degree of emotional distress. • Apparent impulsivity and/or low tolerance of frustration. • Fascination with weapons. • Preoccupation with violent themes of revenge and/or unusual interest in violent acts. Learn to identify behaviors of concern
  24. 24. HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters Practicing Prevention: Critical Issues and Insights 24
  25. 25. HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters Managing a Stalker Incident An anonymous caller reported one of the firm’s receptionists was slandering its management team. The company quickly learned the caller was known to their employee and had been stalking her for over a year. Calls to local law enforcement resulted in an initial flurry of incident reports and administrative filings, but progress in the case quickly stalled. 25 REAL-LIFE CONTEXT: CASE STUDIES
  26. 26. HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters A Former Employee’s Potential for Violence A disgruntled former employee began sending inappropriate emails to current employees. The client needed to assess the individual’s potential for violence. 26 REAL-LIFE CONTEXT: CASE STUDIES
  27. 27. The Facebook Threat An employee in an East Coast branch office posted threatening statements about company personnel on his Facebook wall along with several pictures of himself posing with weapons. 27 REAL-LIFE CONTEXT: CASE STUDIES HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters
  28. 28. HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters Targeted workplace violence in the United States On average, 1.7 million people annually are victims of violent crime while working – including an average of 700 homicides per year. 28 CRITICAL ISSUES TO KEEP IN MIND
  29. 29. HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters The Active Shooter We must do everything possible to PREVENT active shooter events • 37% of attacks ended in less than 5 minutes • Average attack lasted 12 minutes • 74% of attackers entered through a main entrance • 51% of attacks occurred in the workplace 29 CRITICAL ISSUES TO KEEP IN MIND
  30. 30. An Active Shooter Plan is an essential component of a every company’s overall Emergency Management Plan. 30 THE FOUR-PART ACTIVE SHOOTER PLAN HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters
  31. 31. HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters Internal investigations are controlled by the organization 31 CRITICAL ISSUES TO KEEP IN MIND External investigations are controlled by law enforcement agencies
  32. 32. Workplace violence prevention is not best left to law enforcement CRITICAL ISSUES TO KEEP IN MIND HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters32 Traditional law enforcement primarily focuses on post-event operations – investigating, seizing evidence, arresting suspects and prosecuting the accused. Unless law enforcement officials have received specific training on violence prevention, they are not likely to take advantage of information reported to them in an effective manner.
  33. 33. Provides an overview of policies, processes and protocols organizations can adopt • Identify and prevent threatening behaviors and violence affecting the workplace • Better address and resolve threats and violence that have actually occurred HILLARD HEINTZE © 2016 | Protecting What Matters33 ASIS STANDARD ON WORKPLACE VIOLENCE

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