How to Make Happy Patrons: The Science Behind Good User Experiences with Libraries

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How following a user centred design process - whether for a library website or for designing signage and way finding through a physical library - makes for a good user experience (UX) and happy patrons. By designing based on data rather than opinion or personal preference, a design can be validated long before coding or begins.

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How to Make Happy Patrons: The Science Behind Good User Experiences with Libraries

  1. 1. MAKING HAPPY PATRONS The science behind good user experiences Hilary Little, Senior User Experience Designer | www.hilarylittle.com | @HiLittle 1
  2. 2. All aspects of the end-user's interaction with your organization, its services, and its products. UX 2
  3. 3. 3
  4. 4. 97% of websites fail at UX 4
  5. 5. “It really just means making sure that something works well: that a person of average ability and experience can use the thing – whether it’s a web site, remote control, or revolving door – for its intended purpose without getting hopelessly frustrated.” – Steve Krug 5
  6. 6. There’s a process for that. 6
  7. 7. good UX = high usability. usability = the extent to which something can be used by specified users to achieve specified goals with effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction in a specified context of use. The process we follow to ensure a good UX. User Centred Design 7
  8. 8. User Centred Design DesignResearch Test 8
  9. 9. functional reliable usable pleasurable Hierarchy of UX needs Available and accurate Easy to use Enjoyable to use Works as coded 9
  10. 10. functional reliable usable pleasurable Works as coded Available and accurate Easy to use {Test the code Enjoyable to use Measuring success 10
  11. 11. functional reliable usable pleasurable Works as coded Available and accurate Easy to use {Test the code {Test the design Enjoyable to use Measuring success 11
  12. 12. Observe them in their natural habitat 12
  13. 13. “Ford’s quality ratings plunged and a feature meant to increase loyalty instead damaged perceptions of the company.” Nick Bunkley, NYT Ask Ford. 13
  14. 14. Do not ask users what they want "If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses." Henry Ford 14
  15. 15. Observe them What users say and what they do are different. 15
  16. 16. 16
  17. 17. Outdated design process Design decision Revise Done Boss likes it? YesNo 17
  18. 18. “One of usability’s most hard-earned lessons is that ‘you are not the user.’ If you work on a development project, you’re atypical by definition.” -Jakob Nielsen 18
  19. 19. Outdated design process Design decision Revise Done Boss likes it? YesNo 19
  20. 20. Evidence-based design process Design decision Iterate Keep it Users successful? YesNo Test with users 20
  21. 21. Total cost of one design decision Time 10,800 additional person daysMoney $3 million dollars in additional operating costs Risk At least 60 additional targeters 21
  22. 22. Based on R. Pressman (2000), Software Engineering:A Practitioner's Approach and Ehrlich and Rohn, Cost-Justification of Usability Engineering:AVendor’s Perspective, In Bias & Mayhew (1994) Cost-Justifying Usability. $1000 $10,000 THE COST OF FIXING BAD DESIGN Design Develop Deploy $100 22
  23. 23. “Provide a simple and convenient payment option” - PRESTO “PRESTO – It’s that easy” “Life is easier with PRESTO” 23
  24. 24. “Maddening, cumbersome, punitive.” “I call it ‘PAINSTO’.” “Presto is by far the most confusing, not user friendly, not convenient service ever. Their phone line even worse.” - CUSTOMERS 24
  25. 25. “I want convenient, easy and fast fare payment.” 25
  26. 26. 26
  27. 27. “Uptime of the website meets or exceeds PRESTO standards. Customer convenience features are functional and available.” functional reliable usable pleasurable Available and accurate Easy to use Enjoyable to use Works as coded x x 27
  28. 28. Really? 28
  29. 29. 29
  30. 30. “I am no longer a Presto user.” 30
  31. 31. You don’t know it’s usable until you test it with users. 31
  32. 32. Ninja UX: Prototype designs. Test them with users. See where they run into problems. Fix them. 32
  33. 33. Sweet spot: 5 users 33
  34. 34. •4-6 tasks •Create a prototype •Ask users to “think aloud” •No coaching! 34
  35. 35. Bad task: Search for “LoveYou Forever:The Best of Robert Munsch” and reserve it.Good task: You are going on a road trip with your children tomorrow and want to keep them entertained while you drive. How would you find a Robert Munsch audiobook you can pick up on your way home from work? 35
  36. 36. “You just finished reading Malcolm X and are interested in checking out which other Pulitzer-prize winning biographies the library carries. How would you find them?” “Find the United States heading in our Awards section.” 36
  37. 37. Recruiting users 37
  38. 38. Metrics •Task completion rates •Errors •Time on task •Satisfaction 38
  39. 39. Designing for pleasure: It’s all in the details. tp://nothingbutbonfires.com/photos/1838342742/set/72157603044198558 39
  40. 40. Answer questions before they’re asked. List of ways to design for pleasure from: : http://boxesandarrows.com/from-satisfaction-to-delight/ 40
  41. 41. Communicate using a heightened degree of respect, tolerance and empathy. 41
  42. 42. Maximize user capacity for insight, curiosity and perception; create the desire to engage. 42
  43. 43. Intelligently personalize experiences based on past needs, behaviors or purchases. 43
  44. 44. Recognize connections or relationships of value to the user. 44
  45. 45. Demonstrate that you know and understand the user. 45
  46. 46. Provide pleasant surprises. 46
  47. 47. UX functional reliable usable pleasurable Works as coded Available and accurate Easy to use {Test the code {Test the design Enjoyable to use Design decision Iterate Keep it Users successful? YesNo Test with users 47
  48. 48. Ninja UX Code of Honor • Know your user, and you are not your user. • Don’t ask users what they want. • Make design decisions based on data, not opinion. • Treat design as a hypothesis to test. • Fail early and fail often. • Go the extra mile. UX 48
  49. 49. Go make happy patrons! UX Hilary Little, Senior User Experience Architect | www.hilarylittle.com | @HiLittle 49

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