A powerpoint against powerpoint.key

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This is a draft of a presentation drawing upon an a New Yorker article about the epistemology of Powerpoint. Essentially, this is a warning about Powerpoint.

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  • A powerpoint against powerpoint.key

    1. 1. Reasons to AvoidPresentation Software Dangerous Visual Compulsions
    2. 2. Opportunities
    3. 3. or Compulsions?
    4. 4. Opportunity vs. Compulsion  “The opportunities to produce further and further ‘generations’ of contrivances are indistinguishable from the compulsions to do so.” (Kenneth Burke, Attitudes Toward History, p. 396.)
    5. 5. A Few Worries about Powerpoint-style Why I worry about using powerpoint or similar methods of pedagogy in classes. Not why EVERYONE should worry
    6. 6. Remember “conversations”? Before there were presentations, there were conversations, which were a little like presentations but used fewer bullet points, and no one had to dim the lights.
    7. 7. Powerpoint conditions us to"deliver content" helps you make a case, but it also makes its own case: about how to organize information, how much information to organize, how to look at the world.
    8. 8. Conditions Users’ FrameShepherds users toward a staccato, summarizing...frame of mind.
    9. 9. Bad Result: Distances presenter from audienceInstead of human contact, we are given human display.BUT: Real conversations involve give and take to arrive at a new answer. Powerpoint encourages us to present to each other, instead of taking risks and engaging.
    10. 10. Bad Result : Wastes Prep Time with formattingTalented and highly paid people spend hours formatting slides Rather than concentrating on what to say.Imagine: 100, 000 professors and executives pondering: Arial? Times Roman? Twenty-four point? Eighteen point?’
    11. 11. Disguises or hides logicalflaws
    12. 12. Disguises or hides logicalflaws
    13. 13. Information Conveyor Professor Clifford Nass at Stanford: For the student... PowerPoint “lowers the ceiling”
    14. 14. What the student loses "What you miss is the process. The classes I remember most, the professors I remember most, were the ones where you could watch how they thought. You don’t remember what they said, the details. It was ‘What an elegant way to wrap around a problem!’ PowerPoint takes that away. PowerPoint gives you the outcome, but it removes the process.”
    15. 15. What the professor loses Nass: As a professor, “What I miss is, when I used to lecture without PowerPoint, every now and then I’d get a cool idea...[and] I just went for it —twenty-five minutes. And to this day students who were in that class remember it. Now, that couldn’t happen because students will ask: ‘Where the hell is the slide?’
    16. 16. Information is not allProfessors can and ought to be:rhetoriciansstorytellerspoets as well as "content providers."
    17. 17. In other words“Expertise” must be......an adjective which appliesto a whole range of abilities
    18. 18. Lesson: Let’s be Carefulout there!

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