WFDF rules 9-15 of ultimate 2009

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  • WFDF rules 9-15 of ultimate 2009

    1. 1. 9. STALL COUNT 9.| . The marker administers a stall count on the thrower by announcing “Stalling” and then counting from one (I) to ten (|0). The interval between the start of each word in the stall count must be at least one (I) second. 9.2. The stall count must be clearly audible to the thrower. A5. Language A5.1. The stall count and all calls must be in English.
    2. 2. 9.3.The marker may only start a stall count when the disc is live. 9.1 When to start the stall count What The marker can start the stall count as Soon as the thrower has caught the disc. Result Even if the thrower still has to stop, get up after a dive, or even come back into the field because they ran out of the field, the marker may start the count. Why Rules 9.3/9.4 state that the marker can start stalling when they are within 3 metres of the thrower and the disc is live (so this does not apply after a turnover). There is nothing in those rules that says that the player must have established a pivot point. Extra If the offensive player needs some time to recover because they had to avoid an object outside the field (for safety, there shouldn't be any, but in practice this may be the case) the marker should not count until the player has had that time. This is basic spirit of the game.
    3. 3. 9.4. The marker may only start and continue a stall count when they are within three (3) metres of the thrower and all defenders are legitimately positioned (Section |8.| ). 9.5. If the marker moves more than three (3) metres from the thrower, or a different player becomes the marker, the stall count must be restarted at one (I).
    4. 4. 9.6. To restart a stall count “at maximum n”, where (G 9’ ' n IS a number between one (I) and nine (9), means to announce “stalling” followed by the count at one more than the last number uttered prior to the CC 79 stoppage, or by n if that value is greater than “n”. 9.2 Stall counts (9.6) What If, after a call, a stall count is to be restarted at maximum 6 and: the stall count was stopped at 4, the stall count restarts on "Sta| |ing 5" the stall count was stopped at 8, the stall count restarts on "Stalling 6" Extra There must be one second between starting to say stalling" and starting to say the number of the count
    5. 5. |0.THE CHECK
    6. 6. I0. I . Whenever play stops during a point for a time- out, foul, violation, contested turnover, safety stoppage or injury stoppage, play shall restart as quickly as possible with a check. Q} l K‘'‘‘‘ ° """""'Vi—unn§—. It’ ll i¢" ¢~. ..-, I . p . ;| l‘
    7. 7. |0.2. Except in the case of a time-out: l0.2.| . All players shall return to the positions they held when the event that caused the stoppage occurred. |0.2.2. If the disc was in the air when the event that caused the stoppage occurred, and the disc is returned to the thrower to restart play, all players shall return to the positions they held when the disc was released by the thrower. | O.2.3.A| l players must remain stationary in that position until the disc is checked in.
    8. 8. |0.3. Any player may briefly extend a stoppage of play to correct faulty equipment, but active play may not be stopped for this purpose. 10.1 Faulty Equipment (10.3) Note Faulty equipment for example includes untied shoelaces, a bent disc or a shoe that has come off. However, it is players’ responsibility to minimise such disruptions by ensuring their personal equipment is secure.
    9. 9. |0.4. The person checking the disc in must first verify with the nearest opposition player that their team is ready. 10.2 Checking in the disc after a foul or violation Result The thrower may not self check the disc in, e. g. 'ground check‘. The nearest defender must give permission for the thrower to make a 'ground check‘. Likewise the defender must wait for the thrower to present the disc before checking it in. If one team delays the check in order to discuss tactics, it is against spirit of the game and should be discussed by the captains as soon as possible. Extra Both the thrower and the defender should confirm that their teammates are set. If play is checked in without all players having reset, this is a violation and play should stop. A check is only required after a call which stops play. No check or ground tap is required after a turnover or a pull.
    10. 10. lO.5.To restart play: IO.5. I. if the disc is within reach of a defender, they shall touch the disc and call "Disc In"; |0.5.2. if the disc is not within reach of a defender, the thrower shall touch the disc to the ground and call “Disc In’’; or | O.5.3. if the disc is not within reach of a defender and there is no thrower, the defender nearest to the disc shall call “Disc | n”.
    11. 11. .l~
    12. 12. |0.6. If the thrower attempts a pass before the check, or a violation of lO.2 is called, the pass does not count regardless of whether it is complete or incomplete, and possession reverts back to the thrower.
    13. 13. I | .OUT-OF-BOUNDS | |.| . The entire playing field is in-bounds. The perimeter lines are not part of the playing field and are out-of-bounds. All non-players are part of the out-of-bounds area. | |.2. The out-of-bounds area consists of the area which is not in-bounds and everything in Contact with it, except for defensive players, who are always considered “in-bounds” for purposes of making a play on the disc.
    14. 14. I | .3.An offensive player who is not out-of-bounds is in-bounds. I | .3. I . An airborne player retains their in-bounds! out-of-bounds status until that player contacts the playing field or the out-of-bounds area.
    15. 15. 11.1 The "Greatest Play in the World" What An offensive player realises that they cannot catch the disc in- bounds and jumps from an in-bounds position, catches the disc and throws it before they land (out-of- bounds). Result This is a valid pass. Why Rule 1 1.3.1. states that an airborne player who jumped from in-bounds is still in- bounds. This lasts until the player lands out-of-bounds and by that time the player has already released the disc. Therefore, the disc is not out. A player is allowed to throw the disc while in the air, according to rule 18.2.2. Extra A player my not catch their own "greatest" throw. That is a turnover (13.1.4). If there is a contested call regarding the catch after a "greatest", the player who threw the "greatest" should be treated as the last thrower. They should establish a pivot at the point on the playing field closest to where they released the disc (or on the goal line if this would result in a pivot in their attacking end zone).
    16. 16. || .3.2. A thrower in possession of the disc, who contacts the playing field and then touches an out- of-bounds area, is still considered in-bounds. I | .3.2.| . If the thrower leaves the playing field, they must establish the pivot at the spot on the playing field where they crossed the perimeter line (unless |4.2 is in effect). || .3.3. Contact between players does not confer the state of being in- or out-ofbounds from one to another. | |.4. A disc is in-bounds once it is live, or when play starts or restarts.
    17. 17. ll.5. A disc becomes out-of-bounds when it first contacts the out-of-bounds area or contacts an out- of-bounds offensive p| ayer. A disc in the possession of an offensive player has the same in/ out-of-bounds status as that player. If the disc is simultaneously in the possession of more than one offensive player, one of them being out-of-bounds, the disc is out-of-bounds. I | .6. The disc may fly outside a perimeter line and return to the playing field, and players may go out- of-bounds to make a play on the disc.
    18. 18. I | .7. The place where a disc went out-of-bounds is the spot where, prior to contacting an out-of-bounds area or player, the disc was most recently: I | .7. I . partly or wholly over the playing field; or I | .7.2. contacted by in-bounds player. 11.4 Disc goes out of bounds What A long throw from the sideline doesn't come back in field. Where do you set your pivot correctly and continue to play?
    19. 19. Result A defender is always in bounds when making a play on the disc (11.2). This means that if a defender touches the disc whilst out of bounds — the disc is then played from nearest point on the playing field proper (11.7.2). Note: if a defender hits the disc but the wind takes the disc back in field - the disc is still live. Offensive players can become out of bounds (11.5). This means in the same situation if offence touches the disc first then it is a turnover and the disc goes back to where it crossed the perimeter line (i. e. was last in-bounds). (1 1.7.1). If an offensive player jumps from in-bounds and touches the disc before landing, then that establishes a point where the disc was in-bounds. If it then is turned over, the disc will come into play at the point nearest to where the offensive player touched the disc.
    20. 20. I | .8. To continue play after an out-of-bounds turnover, the thrower establishes the pivot at the spot on the playing field proper nearest to where the disc went out-of-bounds. 11.3 Where to establish a pivot foot — disc out-of-bounds What A disc is turned over after it flew over the sideline. Result The thrower establishes a pivot foot on the sideline or just next to it.
    21. 21. Why Rule 11.7/8 tells the thrower to establish a pivot foot on the playing field proper closest to the place the disc crossed the line. The official spot is just next to the line (since the line is not part of the playing field), but a pivot foot on the line is also acceptable. Given the fact that perimeter lines are only a few centimetres wide, the "error" is too small to be significant. While the rules state that the pivot point should be established in-bounds, rule 11.3.2 also says that it is not a problem that the pivot foot contacts an out-of-bounds area. Extra If the disc flew out the side of the end zone, there is a cone on the spot where the pivot point should be established. Rule 2.8 states that the edge of the playing field proper must be marked by that cone, so the player should not move it. Therefore the pivot point should be established on the end zone line next to the cone. There is no need to move the cone. Note that the player is allowed to have enough room to turn on their pivot foot (othen/ vise unsafe situations might occur during pivoting).
    22. 22. || .9. If the disc is out-of-bounds and more than three (3) metres from the pivot point, nonplayers may retrieve the disc. The thrower must carry the disc the last three (3) metres to the playing field. 11.5 Non-player retrieving an out-of-bounds disc What A non-player retrieves an out-of-bounds disc and returns it to the thrower who is standing on the perimeter line. Result Rule 11.9 allows non-players to retrieve the disc, however the thrower must carry the disc the last 3 metres. Therefore the thrower should walk 3 metres away from the field and then return. They may then establish a pivot at the correct spot and continue play.
    23. 23. Extra If the thrower commences play without going 3 metres away the opposition may call violation and play will restart with a check. However if the opposition does not feel they have been disadvantaged by the disc being returned to the thrower, they can allow play to continue. Non-players may also stop an out-of-bounds disc that is more than 3 metres from the pivot point.
    24. 24. I2. RECEIVERS AND POSITIONING |2.| . A player “catches” the disc by demonstrating sustained control of a non-spinning disc. l2.2. If the player loses control of the disc due to subsequent contact with the ground or a team- mate or a legitimately positioned opposition player, the catch is deemed to have not occurred.
    25. 25. ' o _. ‘ up. u ‘ n ‘. 0 o. I s . . o
    26. 26. l2.3. The following are turnovers, and no catch is deemed to have occurred: |2.3. I . an offensive receiver is out-of-bounds when they contact the disc; or |2.3.2. after catching the disc, an offensive receiver's first contact is out-of-bounds while still in possession of the disc. |2.4.After a catch, that player becomes the thrower. |2.5. If offensive and defensive players catch the disc simultaneously, the offence retains possession.
    27. 27. , . . § " A, n ‘ . ‘ - V n 3‘: _ . . ‘ a '
    28. 28. I2.6.A player in an established position is entitled to remain in that position and should not be contacted by an opposing player. |2.7.When a player is making a play on the disc, an opposing player may not move to intentionally impede that player's movements, unless they are also making a play on the disc.
    29. 29. 12.1 Making a play on the disc Note A player can be deemed to be "making a play on the disc" (Rule 12.7) when the disc is in the air and they are attempting to make contact with the disc in anyway i. e. to catch it or block it. When making a play at a disc, players need to insure that they will not cause non incidental contact with another player (neither their stationary position, nor their expected position based on their established speed and direction), before, during or after the attempt at the disc. Non incidental contact is any contact that is either dangerous in nature or affects the outcome of a play, regardless of whether the contact occurred after a turnover. |2.8. Every player is entitled to occupy any position on the field not occupied by any opposing player, provided that they do not cause contact in taking such a position.
    30. 30. |2.9. When the disc is in the air, all players must attempt to avoid contact with other players, and there is no situation where a player may justify initiating contact. “Making a play for the disc” is not a valid excuse for initiating contact with other players. 12.2 Player positioning when the disc is in the air What Player A is chasing after the disc and slows down to ensure they can remain between Player B and the disc. Player B runs into the back of PlayerA and they both trip over. Result Player B has fouled Player A. Why Player A is allowed to slow down to make a play on the disc. Player B could have reasonably avoided Player A and is therefore initiating contact.
    31. 31. What Player A is chasing after the disc and stops suddenly and runs immediately backwards into their approaching defender. Player B runs into the back of P| ayerA. Result PIayerA has fouled Player B. Why Player B could not avoid reasonably have avoided Player A, therefore Player A has initiated contact.
    32. 32. What Result Why Extra Player A is chasing after the disc and slows down and moves from side to side to prevent Player B from getting around them and making a play at the disc. Player B runs into the back of Player A. Player A catches the disc. Player B has fouled Player A. Player A has possession so does not need to make a call, or should call ''play on" if they had made a call. Player A is allowed to slow down and to impede a player's movement to make a play on the disc. Player B could have reasonably avoided Player A and is therefore initiating contact. Impeding a player's movement is different from initiating contact. Some incidental contact may occur in these circumstances but incidental contact is not a foul.
    33. 33. What Result Why Extra Player A and Player B are teammates and are chasing after the disc. Player B slows down and moves from side to side to prevent an opponent, Player C, from getting around them and making a play at the disc. P| ayerA catches the disc. Player C can call a violation against Player B. Player B is not making a play for the disc. Player C is making a play on the disc and therefore Player B is not allowed to intentionally impede their movement. If Player B is stationary they are allowed to remain there, even if that impedes Player C's attempt to make a play at the disc. However if Player B sticks out their arms to impede Player C — that is still considered a movement to impede Players C's movements and is a violation.
    34. 34. What Result Extra PlayerA is stationary and waiting to catch the disc. Player B is running towards Player A, then jumps, intercepts the pass, and then collides with P| ayerA Player B has fouled Player A. Rule 12.9 expressly says that making a play for the disc is not a valid excuse for initiating contact with other players. When making a play at a disc, players need to insure that they will not cause a collision with another player's position, if stationary, or their established speed and direction, before, during or after the attempt at the disc.
    35. 35. What Player A is stationary and waiting to catch the disc. Player B is running and then jumps in a way that would avoid player A and intercepts the pass. Player A moves into Player B's path while Player B is in the air. There is contact between Player A and Player B. Result PlayerA has fouled Player B. Why Player A has initiated contact by moving to a position that a moving opponent will be unable to avoid. This is a blocking foul.
    36. 36. |2.| O. Some incidental contact, not affecting the outcome of the play or safety of players, may occur as two or more players move towards a single point simultaneously. Incidental contact should be minimized but is not considered a foul. |2.| |. All players have the right to the space immediately above them. An opponent may not obstruct a player from occupying this space.
    37. 37. .. 9- . t 1.. t. 5 - l C _A - . — - . ‘ I ‘ “ . ' I. s -"< - 9 . .., . a‘ . ‘u ‘g ‘ . I
    38. 38. |2.l2. No player may physically assist the movement of another player.
    39. 39. I 3.TURNOVERS |3.| . A turnover transfers possession of the disc from one team to the other and occurs when: |3.I. I. the disc contacts the ground while it is not in the possession of an offensive player (a “down”); I3. I .2. the disc is handed over from one offensive player to another without ever being completely untouched by both players (a“hand-over”); |3.| .3. the thrower intentionally deflects a pass to themselves off another player (a “deflection”); I3. I .4. in attempting a pass, the thrower contacts the disc after release prior to the disc being contacted by another player (a ‘‘double touch”);
    40. 40. 13.1 Double turnovers What Result Why Extra A defender from Team A intercepts a pass from Team B and then puts the disc down or intentionally drops the disc. It is a double turnover and Team B gains possession of the disc. Once the defender from Team A has possession of the disc they become an offensive player. If the disc then contacts the ground while not in the possession of an offensive player it is a turnover and Team A loses possession. If, in attempting to intercept the pass, defender from Team A loses control of the disc due to ground contact, or accidentally drops the disc, then the catch is deemed to have not occurred and Team A gains possession of the disc.
    41. 41. 13.2 Double touch turnovers What Result Why Extra The thrower accidentally releases the disc while pivoting, and then catches it again, without any other player touching the disc. This is not a double touch turnover (13.1.4). The marker can continue the stall count. If the thrower has moved their pivot foot a travel infraction can be called. A double touch turnover can only occur after the thrower has attempted a pass. A pass is defined (under Throw) as "A disc in flight following any throwing motion, including after a fake attempt and an intencionally dropped disc, that results in loss of contact between the trower and the disc”. As the disc was not in flight after a throwing motion or fake attempt, no pass has ocurred and therefore 13.1.4 does not apply. If the disc is accidentally release after a fake attempt, the thrower cannot touch the disc until another player does it is a double touch tumover.
    42. 42. I3. I .5. a pass is caught by a defensive player (an “interception”); I3. I .6. the disc becomes out-of bounds (an “out-of-bounds”); |3.| .7. the thrower has not released the disc before the marker first starts to say the word “ten” in the stall count (a“sta| |-out”); |3.I.8. there is an uncontested offensive receiving foul; or l3.l.9. during the pull, the receiving team touches the disc before it contacts the ground, and fails to catch the disc (a “dropped pull”).
    43. 43. |3.2. If it is unclear whether a turnover occurred, the p| ayer(s) with the best perspective quickly makes the call. If either team disagrees they may call "contest" and: |3.2. I . the disc is returned to the thrower; and l3.2.2. any stall count restarts at maximum nine (9).
    44. 44. 11.6 What to call when in or out What A player catches the disc in such a way that it is unclear if the catch was in or out. Scenarios: 1 . An opponent calls "out" and the player agrees 2. An opponent calls "out" but another player with good perspective disagrees. There is no agreement. 3. An opponent calls "out" but another player with good perspective disagrees and provides additional information that convinces the opponent that the player was not out. 4. An opponent calls "travel" because they believe the player caught the disc in bounds but momentum has taken them out of bounds and they have not returned in bounds.
    45. 45. Result 1 . This is a turnover 2. The disc is returned to the previous thrower 3. The catch is deemed to be in and play resumes afler a check 4. The opponent pauses any stall count and points to the spot where the pivot should be established. The thrower establishes their pivot in the correct spot as quickly as possible and the stall count may resume.
    46. 46. Why Rule 13.2 applies in Scenario 1 and 2: it was unclear if a turnover occurred and the opponent made "the call'' (note that the rules do not specifically state what the call must be, but "out" is very appropriate). Situation 3 is a loose interpretation of rule 13.2: the player can have the impression that the opponent made the call without all relevant information (e. g. ''I caught the disc with my right foot still in the air") and thus claim best perspective on that aspect. If the opponent accepts that information and that information clearly indicates that it was not a tumover, retuming the disc to the previous thrower is obviously not a good solution (this follows from rule 1.2). Note that situations like 3 could lead to long discussions and those should be avoided at all cost. If it is clear that the opponent does not accept the extra information, the player should simply call “contest” and retum the disc to the previous thrower.
    47. 47. |3.3. If a fast count occurs in such a manner that the offence does not have a reasonable opportunity to call fast count before a stall-out, the play is treated as a contested stallout (I 3.2). |3.4. If the thrower contests a stall-out but also attempts a pass, and the pass is incomplete, then the turnover stands and play continues.
    48. 48. |3.5.After a turnover, the turnover location is where: |3.5. I. the disc has come to a stop or is picked up by an offensive player; or |3.5.2. the intercepting player stops; or |3.5.3. the thrower was located, in the case of |3.I.2, |3.| .3, l3.| .4, |3.I.7;or |3.5.4. the uncontested offensive receiving foul occurred.
    49. 49. |3.6. If the turnover location is in the playing field proper, the thrower must establish the pivot at that point. 11.2 Where to establish a pivot foot — disc in-bounds What A disc is turned over and is in the Playing Field. Result The thrower establishes a pivot foot at the same location as the disc where it was picked up. Why Rule 13.6 tells the thrower to establish a pivot at the turnover location. Extra The pivot should be as close to the disc's location as possible. Players should not place their right foot at the turnover location and then use their left foot as their pivot. This is a travel infraction (18.2.6.1)
    50. 50. |3.7. If the turnover location is in the offence’s attacking end zone, the thrower must establish the pivot at the nearest point on the goal line. I3.8. If the turnover location is in the offence’s defending end zone, the thrower may choose where to establish the pivot: l3.8.l. at the turnover location, by staying at the turnover location or faking a pass; or |3.8.2. at the nearest point on the goal line to the turnover location, by moving from the turnover location. |3.8.3. Immediate movement or failure to move determines where to establish the pivot and cannot be reversed.
    51. 51. |3.9. If the turnover location is out-of-bounds, play continues according to Section I | .7. |3.|0. If, after a turnover, play has continued unknowingly, play stops and the disc is returned to the turnover location, players resume their positions at the time the turnover occurred and play restarts with a check.
    52. 52. I4. SCORING |4.| .A goal is scored if an in-bounds player catches a legal pass and all of their first simultaneous points of contact after catching the disc are entirely within their attacking end zone (note I2. I, l2.2). T . .-. _.. nu; (4 Q‘ ' 14.2 Scoring a Goal Note If a player believes they have scored a goal according to 14.1 they should call Goal . This call stops de the game.
    53. 53. 14.1 Callahan Goals What Result Extra The offence throws the disc, but a defender intercepts the pass in the Offence’s defending end zone (which is the Defence’ss attacking end zone). The defence scores a goal. Rule 14.1 states that the goal is scored when a player catches a legal pass and the first contact with the ground is inside their attacking endzone. It does not state that the pass has to be from a teammate. The term Callahan Goal is an unofficial term for this type of goal.
    54. 54. 14.3 Receiver nearly catches a goal What A receiver catches the disc near the end zone and it is unclear if a goal has been scored according to 14.1. Result If it is unclear if the player scored they must leave the end zone and play continues (rule 14.2). If play has not been stopped to discuss the goal, or the receiver has not called Goal . then play can continue without a check Extra If the receiver called Goal and this has been contested, or there has been a significant delay to determine if the receiver has scored a goal, play should restart with a check. 2. 1{_.
    55. 55. 14.4 Throwing the disc after a score. What Result Why Extra A player catches the disc in the attacking end zone. but does not know this and throws the disc away. It is a goal Rule 14.1 does not say that the player scoring the goal must be aware of it. So if somebody has a clear perspective on it and declares it a goal, it is a goal. The disc cannot be thrown away after a goal is scored, so that action can be disregarded. If it is unclear if the player scored (ie there is no agreement on the player who had best perspective, and there are opposing view points on the play) the result of the pass stands.
    56. 56. |4.2. If a player in possession of the disc ends up completely behind the attacking goal line without scoring a goal according to |4.| , the player establishes the pivot at the nearest point of the goal line. l4.3.The time at which a goal is scored is when, after the disc is caught, contact is first made with the end zone.
    57. 57. I 5. CALLING FOULS, INFRACTIONS AND VIOLATIONS |5.| . A breach of the rules due to non-incidental contact between two or more opposing players is a foul. |5.2.A breach of the rules regarding a Marking or Travel breach is an infraction. Infractions do not stop play. |5.3. Every other breach of the rules is a violation. l5.4. Only the player fouled may claim a foul, by calling “Fou| ”.
    58. 58. 15.1 Accepting Calls Note When a foul is called and it is uncontested this should be communicated loudly and clearly |5.5. Any opposing player may claim an infraction, by calling the specific name of the infraction. l5.6. Any opposing player may claim a violation, by calling the specific name of the violation or "Violation", unless specified otherwise by the particular rule. |5.7. Calls must be made immediately after the breach occurs.
    59. 59. l5.8. If a player from the team against which the foul, infraction or violation has been called disagrees that it occurred, they may call “Contest”. A4.7. After a foul or violation is called: A4.7.1. After thirty (30) seconds, if the call is not resolved, the captains will step in. A4.7.2. Alter sixty (60) seconds, if the call is not resolved, the call will be considered contested and will be returned to the last thrower for a check. A4.7.3. The timekeeper will signal: A4.7.3.1. Thirty (30) seconds after the foul or violation was called. A4.7.3.2. Sixty (60) seconds after the foul or violation was called. l5.9. If a player making the “Fou| ”, “Violation” or “Contest” call subsequently determines that their call was unnecessary, they can retract the call, by calling "Retracted". Play restarts with a check.
    60. 60. I5.| O. Stall Counts after a Foul, Violation or Contest resume as follows (unless specified otherwise): I5. I 0. I . After a foul or violation by the defence: |5.|0.l. l. if there is no contest the count is reset to one (I); |5.| O. I .2. if it is contested any stall count restarts at maximum six (6). |5.| O.2. After a foul by the offence, whether contested or not, any stall count restarts at maximum nine (9). I5. I O.3.After a violation by the offence: I5.l0.3.l. if there is no contest the stall count restarts at maximum nine (9); l5.| O.3.2. if the violation is contested any stall count restarts at maximum six (6).
    61. 61. I5. I 0.4.After simultaneous offsetting fouls or violations, any stall count restarts at maximum six (6). I5. I 0.5. For all other contested calls, any stall count restarts at maximum six (6).

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