Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Lithium and Lithium-ion Batteries: Challenges and Prospects

188 views

Published on

This is the academic presentation by Rahmandhika Firdauzha Hary Hernandha for Materials for Energy Storage and Conversion Device course in National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan. The slides based on an academic paper in Electrochem. Soc. Interface, 2016, 25(3), 85-87 by Stefano Passerini and Bruno Scrosati with other 10 papers as supporting information and images.

Published in: Engineering
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Lithium and Lithium-ion Batteries: Challenges and Prospects

  1. 1. Lithium and Lithium-Ion Batteries: Challenges and Prospects Based on Electrochem. Soc. Interface, 2016, 25(3), 85-87 by Stefano Passerini and Bruno Scrosati Rahmandhika Firdauzha Hary Hernandha | Energy Storage and Electrochemistry lab. Department of Materials Science and Engineering National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (R. O. C.) 1
  2. 2. Outline Introduction LIB Challenges for LIB Alternative for Battery Technology LIB and LB for Future 2
  3. 3. Outline Introduction LIB Challenges for LIB Alternative for Battery Technology LIB and LB for Future 3
  4. 4. 4
  5. 5. 5
  6. 6. Introduction Due to their sporadic nature, solar and wind sources require a suitable system to storage and return energy on demand, and the EVs require an efficient source to power the electric engine. 6
  7. 7. Introduction 7
  8. 8. Outline Introduction LIB Challenges for LIB Alternative for Battery Technology LIB and LB for Future 8
  9. 9. Outline Introduction LIB Challenges for LIB Alternative for Battery Technology LIB and LB for Future 9
  10. 10. LIBs LIB Electrodes: Anodes  Graphite  Li4Ti5O12 (LTO)  Li-M (M = Sn, Si, …)  MO (M = Co, Fe, Cu, Mn, Ni, …) LIB Electrodes: Cathodes  LiCoO2 (LCO)  Lithium iron phosphate (LFP)  LiNi0.32Mn0.33Co0.33O2 (NMC)  LiMn2O4 (LMO)  LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 (NCA)  LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) 10
  11. 11. GRAPHITE • Low specific capacity (∼370 mAh/g) • Relatively good in structural stability • Operating voltage close to that of Li/Li+ (∼0.1 V vs Li/Li+) Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) • limited specific capacity (∼175 mAh/g) • Very high structural stability • High voltage (∼1.5 V vs Li/Li+) Li-M (M = Sn, Si, …) • High specific capacity (for Si ∼3578.5 mAh/g, Sn ~600 mAh/g) • Low structural stability with >350% volume expansion • Low de-lithiation voltage (∼0.4 V vs Li/Li+) MO (M = Co, Fe, Cu, Mn, Ni, …) • High specific capacity (in theory) NiO-C >1000 mAh/g • High structural stability (ex: NiO-C) • Generally poor charge- discharge energy efficiency • Known has a limited cycling stability RSC Adv., 2016,6, 87778-87790 J. Materiomics, 2015, 1(3), 153-169 J. Mater. Chem. A, 2015,3, 5750-5777 Nano-Micro Lett., 2019, 11(3), 1-18 ANODES 11
  12. 12. Layered LiCoO2 (LCO) Nat. Mater., 2003, 2(7), 464-467 Olivine LFP CATHODES Nanoscale Horiz., 2016, 1, 423-444 12
  13. 13. LIBs LIB Electrolytes: Liquids (common solvent is Carbonate: EC/PC/DMC/DEC)  LiPF6 salt  Ionic Liquids, room temperature molten salts (hybrid and pure) LIB Electrolytes: Solids  Mixture of a lithium salt and poly(ethylene oxide) or PEO  Crystalline (still under development) solid membranes NASA robot RoboSimian droid battery blows up (2016) https://sma.nasa.gov/docs/default-source/event-docs/lithium-ion-battery-safety.pdf?sfvrsn=485becf8_4 13
  14. 14. Nat. Commun., 2017, 8:15806, 1-14 “Understanding materials challenges for rechargeable ion batteries with in situ transmission electron microscopy” 14
  15. 15. 15
  16. 16. What we need for better LIBs?  High-stable electrode capacity  High electrode structural stability  Better ionic conductivity electrolytes in wide temperature range  Low flammability system (especially for electrolyte)  High recyclability materials for electrodes and other additional components  Low cost materials  Wider potential range in order to apply it in every condition16
  17. 17. Outline Introduction LIB Challenges for LIB Alternative for Battery Technology LIB and LB for Future 17
  18. 18. Outline Introduction LIB Challenges for LIB Alternative for Battery Technology LIB and LB for Future 18
  19. 19. Then, what’s next? Consistent attention is presently devoted to the so-called “beyond lithium-ion batteries,” including lithium-air, lithium-sulfur, sodium ion, magnesium, and Lithium Metal system. By this review, we divide battery systems into two categories: near-term and long-term technologies. Electrochem. Soc. Interface, 2016, 25(3), 85-87 Nat. Rev. Mater., 2016, 1(13), 1-16 19
  20. 20. Lithium-air (and Metal-air) Nat. Rev. Mater., 2016, 1(13), 1-16 20
  21. 21. Lithium-air (and Metal-air) The challenges faced in the development of the cathode, anode and electrolyte of each battery from panels a–c (previous slide). OER, oxygen evolution reaction; ORR, oxygen reduction reaction. Nat. Rev. Mater., 2016, 1(13), 1-16 21
  22. 22. Lithium-sulfur Nat. Rev. Mater., 2016, 1(13), 1-16 22
  23. 23. Lithium-sulfur Corresponding discharge–charge (left and right panels, respectively) profiles of the structures in panel a (previous slide). Poly(S-r-DIB), poly(sulfur-random-1,3-diisopropenylbenzene); PS, polysulfide. Nat. Rev. Mater., 2016, 1(13), 1-16 23
  24. 24. Sodium-ion Chem. Soc. Rev., 2017, 46, 3529-3614 24
  25. 25. Magnesium Nat. Chem., 2018, 10, 532–539 Schematic of a Mg powder electrode coated with the artificial Mg2+ conducting interphase, and the proposed structure for the artificial Mg2+. 25
  26. 26. Outline Introduction LIB Challenges for LIB Alternative for Battery Technology LIB and LB for Future 26
  27. 27. Outline Introduction LIB Challenges for LIB Alternative for Battery Technology LIB and LB for Future 27
  28. 28. Lithium Battery Nat. Rev. Mater., 2016, 1(13), 1-16 28
  29. 29. Lithium Battery The latest trend in the field is the revitalization of metallic lithium as an advanced anode material for the development of lithium batteries (LBs), a target only possible by the use of an electrolyte medium capable of preventing dendrite growth with the associated serious safety hazard, the most appropriate being a solid electrolyte. Unfortunately, the majority of the electrolytes of this type suffer due to very poor ionic conductivity at room temperature; hence, the solid-state LBs are poor performers at RT as they are affected by a high ohmic polarization. Electrochem. Soc. Interface, 2016, 25(3), 85-87 29
  30. 30. How about future? Electrochem. Soc. Interface, 2016, 25(3), 85-87 In conclusion, the road for the development of efficient LIBs and LBs appears to be still paved by a series of practical difficulties. However, in view of the continuously increasing worldwide activity in the field, we may reasonably foresee a positive change of course in the near future. 30
  31. 31. Journal References 1. Chem. Soc. Rev., 2017, 46, 3529-3614 2. Electrochem. Soc. Interface, 2016, 25(3), 85-87 3. J. Mater. Chem. A, 2015,3, 5750-5777 4. J. Materiomics, 2015, 1(3), 153-169 5. Nano-Micro Lett., 2019, 11(3), 1-18 6. Nanoscale Horiz., 2016, 1, 423-444 7. Nat. Chem., 2018, 10, 532–539 8. Nat. Commun., 2017, 8:15806, 1-14 9. Nat. Mater., 2003, 2(7), 464-467 10. Nat. Rev. Mater., 2016, 1(13), 1-16 11. RSC Adv., 2016,6, 87778-87790 31
  32. 32. THANK YOU Rahmandhika Firdauzha Hary Hernandha | Energy Storage and Electrochemistry lab. Department of Materials Science and Engineering National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (R. O. C.) 32

×