Mobile Devices for Information Literacy Instruction – Is it a Good Idea?

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Presentation with Susan Slaga given at the ACRL New England Conference, May 14, 2010

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  • Other campus services fared almost as poorly: Download/streaming course lectures, Course management systems, payment for services
  • Read questions out loud.
  • Since a typical one shot session is about 45-50 minutes, we did not have time to cover evaluating websites in addition to a library tour and learning how to search the online catalog and a couple of article databases. For number 4 we listed a book that was relevant to the class we were testing.
  • As you can see by the percentages in these tables, the students scored much higher on the post test – more than double on all the questions. We also observed their database searches in the library classroom and they seemed to need less assistance from us and had more of a handle on how to use the databases. (older students, not freshman) Usually after a typical one shot session, we seem to get more questions from students. They seemed to have a good handle on what to do after watching the podcasts.
  • The students also scored a lot higher on the in-class post tests, however the some of the pre test question answers were slightly skewed because some of the students had a previously library session and in the Freshman composition class the professor had gone over a little of the information such as the difference between popular and scholarly sources and where to look for books at the library.
  • Students scored much higher via in class or podcast instruction. The scores were pretty close. Post test scores will of course depend on what types of assignments or tests the professor gives throughout the semester and how much they get to practice. They of course often do better when it’s a class that is important to them.
  • Not going to read all of these. Most of the students viewed the podcasts through iTunes on their computer and several accessed it through the links on the webpage we had set up or through the LibGuide. Only a couple of students listed to them on ipods. When we first did these pilots many CCSU students didn’t own video ipods (or mp3 players) that played video. I think more do now.

    Most of the students liked the podcasts and found them helpful. They liked that they were short and could be replayed if needed. Some even found our earlier ones a little entertaining because I added sound bites or music clips, but I don’t think that is always necessary.

    The only negative comments we got from English class is that some of the students are very busy and looked at this as one more thing that they had to do. The students in the freshman learning communities didn’t seem to mind or didn’t know any better since it was their first semester. Some of the older English students also had a little trouble downloading the large video files when first did the pilot., but the freshman students did not. Some of the 200 level English students found them to be repetitive because they had had library instruction in previous semester. A couple of students just don’t like tutorials, but with any class that just means you need to consider several different types of learning styles and preferences.
  • Most of the students liked the variety of different podcasts and like that they all had sound. They said they probably wouldn’t have liked them as much if they had to read captions and text for each. Most of English students in the beginning pilot seession would have preferred them to have an interactive component so they could practice database searches. We incorporated that for the freshman students and they found it very helpful to practice. (They of course had to do this on their pcs because the ipods aren’t big enough). If there wasn’t an interactive component then they would have liked to have a way to practice – such as a quiz, contest or exercise. (There would also be more motivation if they were graded). Several of the students would prefer a mixture of podcasts and in person instruction just in case they had questions or problems. (Definitely important that a librarian be available in some form to ask questions later.) Several said they would prefer it if they could view the podcasts during class time. Most student also felt more comfortable using library resources and asking questions after viewing the podcasts. Some students said they would prefer to see a picture or video of us with each podcast so that they could better remember who we are and in general prefer videos with people in them as opposed to the screencast tutorials.
  • We were very lucky to work with an English professor that already Debbie knew through a friend. She was interested in learning more about podcasting and thought it would be more appealing to her students. Generally speaking she is a nice, helpful hardworking person that is very involved with the campus community. If you don't have a connection already then maybe ask someone you are on a committee with or someone who brings their class in for instruction each semester.

    At CCSU, our librarians are faculty who are eligible for tenure so we engage in research also and obviously the teaching faculty can relate to that.

    It also helps if you are prepared and organized and available to answer questions about the podcasts or whatever new technology you might be using. We made the podcasts and handled the technical side so that made it easier for the professor.
  • Mobile Devices for Information Literacy Instruction – Is it a Good Idea?

    1. 1. Mobile Devices for Information Literacy Instruction – Is it a Good Idea? Debbie Herman & Susan Slaga Central Connecticut State University
    2. 2. How We Got Started… from screencast to podcast
    3. 3. Project PHASE I – World Lit. 2 Spring 2008 • Library instruction delivered as podcasts over the course of 8 weeks • 1-2 “episodes” per week • Students subscribed to Podcast feed through iTunes • Episode delivery via Podcast feed • Videos optimized for mobility (640 x 480 max. resolution) • Short written assignments given to reinforce/verify students’ understanding of material presented • Librarians met with students mid-semester to answer questions and assess students’ satisfaction with the delivery medium
    4. 4. What do our students really think? ECAR (Educause Center for Applied Research) – 2009 Study Undergraduate Students and Information Technology Summary Findings: •Laptops owned by 87.8% of student respondents . •Internet-capable handheld devices are owned by 51.2% of respondents, with 29% of these owners using the Internet from their devices daily. •73.1% of students report using the College/University Library website. •86.6% use Social Networking sites weekly or more often. •Decreased use of IM (72.5% - 2006, 71.5% 2007, 57.5% in 2008, 55.7% in 2009)
    5. 5. How CCSU Students Responded N=280 • 88.2% report owning a laptop (vs. 89.4% of all 4-yr students surveyed) • 62.1% of respondents own a desktop computer (vs. 43.3% of total) • 93.5% report using the library site at least once per semester (vs. 73.1% of total). • 82.5% use Social Networking sites weekly or more often (86.6%). • 20.8% use podcasts once per semester or more (vs. 28.3% of total) • 77% Think they are either “very skilled” or an “expert” at using the Internet to effectively and efficiently search for information (vs. 58% of total) • 78.2% expect their use of the internet from a handheld device to increase or greatly increase in the next 3 years (vs. 73.5% of total)
    6. 6. Quiz… What percentage WOULD be likely to use library services if available on a handheld device? • CCSU – 19.6% • ALL – 14.2% REALITY CHECK!
    7. 7. Spring 2008 - English 204 Podcast Page
    8. 8. Spring 2009 – Adventures in Research http://burrittlibrary.blip.tv/
    9. 9. Product Placement
    10. 10. Usage 10 episodes watched a total of 3,641 times, but… Only 8% of viewers on average watched the entire episode!
    11. 11. Fall 2009 – English 110 FYE & LibGuides
    12. 12. FYE LibGuide
    13. 13. Quantitative and Qualitative Feedback
    14. 14. Pre/post-test podcast questions 1. What is the difference between popular and scholarly information sources and give two examples of each? 2. List two databases found through the Burritt Library website where you could find articles or criticism about literature or poetry. 3. List three ways you can tell if a website is authoritative or not. 4. From the Burritt Library website, what would you use to find a book or video about Charlotte Bronte? 5. On which floor of the Burritt Library would you find reference sources?
    15. 15. Pre/post-test in-class questions 1. What is the difference between popular and scholarly information sources and give two examples of each? 2. List a database found through the Burritt Library website where you could find scholarly articles. 3. List a database found through the Burritt Library website where you could find newspaper articles. 4. From the Burritt Library website, what would you use to find a book or video about ??? ? 5. On which floor of the Burritt Library would you find reference sources?
    16. 16. Podcast Pre and Post-Test Scores (2008-2009) ? C P C W 1 1.5% 48.5% 50% 2 0 21.21% 78.79% 3 13.63% 31.82% 54.85% 4 16.7% 1.5% 81.8% 5 24.24% 0 75.76% ? C P C W 1 28.82% 54.24% 16.94% 2 44.07% 37.29% 18.64% 3 27.12% 37.29% 35.59% 4 56% 5% 39% 5 72.9% 0 27.1% Pre-test – 66 students c=correct, p c=partially correct, w=wrong Post-test - 59 students c=correct, p c=partially correct, w=wrong
    17. 17. In-Class Pre and Post-Test Scores (Spring 2010) ? C P C W 1 5.6% 52.7% 41.7% 2 16.7% 52.7% 30.6% 3 19.4% 41.7% 38.9% 4 44.4% 5.6% 50% 5 47.2% 0 52.8% ? C P C W 1 22.2% 55.6% 22.2% 2 52.8% 33.4% 13.8% 3 36.1% 22.2% 41.7% 4 52.8% 0 47.2% 5 63.9% 0 36.1% Pre-test – 36 students c=correct, p c=partially correct, w=wrong Post -test – 36 students c=correct, p c=partially correct, w=wrong
    18. 18. Podcast vs. In-Class Post-Test Scores ? C P C W 1 28.82% 54.24% 16.94% 2 44.07% 37.29% 18.64% 3 27.12% 37.29% 35.59% 4 56% 5% 39% 5 72.9% 0 27.1% ? C P C W 1 22.2% 55.6% 22.2% 2 52.8% 33.4% 13.8% 3 36.1% 22.2% 41.7% 4 52.8% 0 47.2% 5 63.9% 0 36.1% Podcast post-test– 59 students c=correct, p c=partially correct, w=wrong In class post-test – 36 students c=correct, p c=partially correct, w=wrong
    19. 19. 1. How many of you … – Loaded the podcasts onto your own ipod? – Accessed the podcasts through iTunes on your computer? – Accessed the podcasts through the link on the webpage? – Accessed the podcasts on the ipod at the library? 2. How did you like the podcasts/tutorials? What did you like about them? 3. What did you dislike about them? Do you have any suggestions of how they could have been done differently or better? 4. What kinds of technical problems did you have if any? Focus Group Questions
    20. 20. 5. Which podcasts did you like best – video, databases tutorials, audio or a combination? 6. Would you have preferred that they be more interactive (i.e. trying some of your own searches)? 7. Would you prefer to get this kind of instruction online or in person? Why? 8. After viewing and listening to these podcasts, how many of you feel more comfortable using the library’s resources? 9. After the podcasts do you feel more comfortable visiting the library and/or asking for help using library resources? Focus Group Questions continued
    21. 21. • Contact someone you already know who is open to using technology and/or trying something new. • Many faculty are open to researching something new because they do it too. • Faculty will hopefully be interested if it’s something that will engage and interest their students more. Collaborating with Faculty
    22. 22. Is it a good idea? • Since so few loaded onto iPod, would not optimize for mobile • Given lack of familiarity with RSS, would not force students to subscribe to the podcast • Make episodes considerably shorter • More live action • More “point of need” placement Yes, but…
    23. 23. Debbie Herman (hermand@ccsu.edu) Susan Slaga (slagas@ccsu.edu) http://library.ccsu.edu

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