H Engage Data Book May 2012

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In January 2012, we released the first version of our Data Book: A PowerPoint compilation of the best publicly available research from the last two years on how employees are using social media, games and mobile devices in their personal lives. It was met with a great deal of enthusiasm and was accessed over 800 times on slideshare.net.

Today, we're pleased to release the May 2012 Data Book, which builds upon the prior report. Slides that have been revised are marked with “updated” in the upper right hand corner.

Some highlights:
Mobile has become the most accessible communication medium available: 88% of adults in the U.S. now own a cell phone

Adults with smartphones (46%) now outnumber those with feature phones (41%)

While income is correlated with smartphone ownership rates, those in the lowest income bracket saw the fastest growth in ownership, a sign that smartphones are becoming more widely accessible

80% of adults use the Internet

20-30% of Facebook “power users” drive the vast majority of activity; the rest of users receive much more from their connections than they give

As we did last time, we’ve purposely left this document as a PowerPoint instead of a PDF. Take the slides. Drop them into presentations. And feel free to send us a note to ask additional questions and share what you’re hearing from your leaders and clients.

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    But            luckily,            we            found            a            working            one            here (copy paste link in browser) :            www.goo.gl/i7K0s4
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H Engage Data Book May 2012

  1. 1. Data BookMay 2012CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD AS POWERPOINT
  2. 2. IntroductionThere’s an old saying that the plural of anecdote is not data.At H Engage, we believe that being equipped with the right data is the best way toinfluence change.Our January 2012 data deck was met with a great deal of enthusiasm and wasaccessed over 800 times on slideshare.net. The May 2012 Data Book builds uponthis prior report. Slides that have been updated are marked with “updated” in theupper right hand corner.As we did last time, we’ve purposely left this document as a PowerPoint instead of aPDF. Take the slides. Drop them into presentations. And feel free to drop us a note toask additional questions and share what you’re hearing from your leaders and clients.All the best,Vlad GysterCo-founder, CEOvlad@hengage.com617-360-8305 © 2011 – H Engage, Inc. – Proprietary and Confidential 2
  3. 3. The headlines Adults are active cell Online behavior has phone users changed dramatically Cell phones have the highest penetration 80% of adults use the Internet of any device – 88% of adults own one The average social gamer is a 43 year old Smartphone owners now outnumber woman working full-time feature phone owners – 46% of American adults now have a smartphone Email accounts for only 13% of time spent online 75% of adults text – 64% text almost every day, Social networks/blogs 86% text at least once a week and games account for over 50% Mobile access is increasing rapidly, Twitter may get plenty of attention, especially in older age segments – but 96% of time spent on social Adults age 55+ who use social media on networks/blogs is spent on Facebook their phone grew 109% from 2010 to 2011 20-30% of Facebook “power users” drive the majority of activity; the rest receive more than they give © 2011 – H Engage, Inc. – Proprietary and Confidential 3
  4. 4. UPDATED88% of adults own a cell phone Relative to other technologies, cell phones are unmatched in their adoption rates % of U.S. adults who own 88% 57% 55% 44% 42% 19% 19% Cell phone Laptop Desktop MP3 player Game console E-book reader Tablet computerPew Research Center via H EngageApril 2012 © 2011 – H Engage, Inc. – Proprietary and Confidential 4
  5. 5. UPDATEDSmartphone users outnumber those with feature phones Smartphones dominate new phone purchases – accounting for 66% of new phones purchased Cell phone ownership May-11 Feb-12 60% 50% 48% % of U.S. adults who own 46% 41% 40% 35% 30% 20% 17% 12% 10% 0% Smartphone Other cell phone No cell phonePew Research Center via H EngageFebruary 2012 © 2011 – H Engage, Inc. – Proprietary and Confidential 5
  6. 6. UPDATEDOver 50% of adults age 18 to 44 own a smartphone Older adults are catching up – 2 in 5 adults age 45-54 now own a smartphone Smartphone ownership May-11 Feb-12 80% 71% 70% 67% 60% 58% 54% 49% % of U.S. adults 50% 44% 44% U.S. avg. = 46% 40% 31% 30% 28% 22% 20% 13% 11% 10% 0% 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+Pew Research Center via H EngageFebruary 2012 © 2011 – H Engage, Inc. – Proprietary and Confidential 6
  7. 7. UPDATEDLower income brackets lag in smartphone adoption However, those earning <$30k saw the fastest growth in ownership, a sign that smartphones are becoming more widely accessible Smartphone ownership by household income May-11 Feb-12 80% 68% 70% 59% 60% 49% % of U.S. adults 50% 46% 40% 38% U.S. avg. = 46% 40% 34% 30% 22% 20% 10% 0% <30,000 30,000-49,999 50,000-74,999 75,000+Pew Research Center via H EngageFebruary 2012 © 2011 – H Engage, Inc. – Proprietary and Confidential 7
  8. 8. UPDATED3 out of 4 adults text Of adults who text, 64% send a text almost every day, and 86% send a text at least once a week % of cell phone owners who engage in the following activities on their cell phone Sent text message 74% Took photos 60% Used email 41% Accessed social networking/blog 35% Accessed weather 35% Played games 31% Accessed search 30% Accessed maps 27% Accessed news 26% Listened to music 24% Accessed sports info 22% Accessed financial news or stock quotes 15% Accessed online retail 12%ComScore via H EngageDecember 2011 © 2011 – H Engage, Inc. – Proprietary and Confidential 8
  9. 9. Text message behaviors vary by age segments All age segments send and receive a significant amount of texts per day, but 18-24 years olds are particularly active, likely due to relatively lower utilization of other communication mediums, like email and voice calls. % of cell owners that text by age Text volume by age per day 95% 109.5 # of texts sent/received per day 85% 58% 41.8 24% 25.9 14 9.8 4.7 18-29 30-49 50-64 65+ 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+Pew Research Center via H EngageMay 2011 © 2011 – H Engage, Inc. – Proprietary and Confidential 9
  10. 10. Minority and low income Americans text more Race/ethnicity Household income 14.9 # of texts sent/received per day # of texts sent/received per day 70.1 13 11.7 11.9 48.9 31.2 Less than $30,000 - $50,000 - $75,000 + White, non-Hispanic Black, non-Hispanic Hispanic $30.000 $49,999 $74,999 Gender Education level 40.9 42 # of texts sent/received per day 69.4 # of texts sent/received per day 53 45.4 23.8 Men Women Less than high High school Some college College + school diplomaPew Research Center via H EngageMay 2011 © 2011 – H Engage, Inc. – Proprietary and Confidential 10
  11. 11. UPDATEDMobile beyond calling and texting More than 55% of U.S. cell phone users browse the web, download content and access applications on their phone – a 24% increase from 2010 to 2011 % of U.S. mobile audience using mobile media Did not use mobile media 44.8% Used mobile media 55.2%ComScore via H EngageQ4 2011 © 2011 – H Engage, Inc. – Proprietary and Confidential 11
  12. 12. People love social apps, not health apps Social apps are the most downloaded, while apps that “helped you track or manage your health” are the least popular. Types of apps that adults download Provided regular updates on news, weather, sports or stocks 74% Helped you communicate with friends or family 67% Helped you learn about something you were interested in 64%Helped you get more information about a destination you were visiting 53% Helped with work-related tasks 48% Helped you shop or make purchases 46% Allowed you to watch movies or TV shows online 43% Helped you get more information about an event you were attending 35% Helped you track or manage your health 29% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% % of app downloaders that have downloaded an appPew Research Center via H EngageAugust 2011 © 2011 – H Engage, Inc. – Proprietary and Confidential 12
  13. 13. UPDATED80% of adults use the Internet Internet use is almost ubiquitous among adults in the U.S. – especially among working age adults (18-64) % of U.S. adults who use the Internet 94% 88% 79% U.S. avg. = 80% 48% 18-29 30-49 50-64 65+Pew Research Center via H EngageFebruary 2012 © 2011 – H Engage, Inc. – Proprietary and Confidential 13
  14. 14. Adults average 32 hours per month online Those between the ages of 45-54 spent the most time, averaging almost 40 hours per month Average hours spent online per person per month 39.3 37.4 36.5 35.8 33.7 32.2 22.3 12-17 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ComScore via H EngageQ1 2011 © 2011 – H Engage, Inc. – Proprietary and Confidential 14
  15. 15. 50% of time online is spent on social and gaming Email continues to fall to third place, accounting for only 13% of time spent online U.S. monthly time spent on most heavily used Internet sectors (millions of hours) Social networks/blogs 906 Games 407 Email 329 Portals 176 Instant messaging 160 Videos/movies 156 Search 138 Software info 131 Multi-category entertainment 111 Classifieds/auctions 107 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 Hours spent (in millions)Nielsen via H EngageJune 2010 © 2011 – H Engage, Inc. – Proprietary and Confidential 15
  16. 16. Facebook is the most popular social network/blog Facebook accounts for 96% of time spent on the top five social networks and blogs Time spent on the top social networks and blogs in a month Facebook 53,457,358 Blogger 723,793 Tumblr 623,525 Twitter 565,156 LinkedIn 325,679 - 10,000,000 20,000,000 30,000,000 40,000,000 50,000,000 60,000,000 Total minutes (000s)Nielsen via H EngageMay 2011 © 2011 – H Engage, Inc. – Proprietary and Confidential 16
  17. 17. UPDATED 66% of adults use an online social media platform Most use social media platforms to stay in touch with family members and friends (both new and old) Major reason adults use social networking sites 67% 64% 50% 14% 9% 5% 3%Staying in touch w/ current friends Staying Connecting family friends youve lost touch with hobbies or comments by celebrities, athletes or politicians in touch w/ w/ old Connecting with others w/ shared Making new friends Reading interests Finding potential romantic or dating partne Pew Research Center via H Engage November 2011 © 2011 – H Engage, Inc. – Proprietary and Confidential 17
  18. 18. UPDATED20-30% of Facebook users drive the majority of activity The rest of users receive more information and feedback from their connections than they contribute Contribute Receive 12% of users tagged a 35% were tagged in a Photos friend in a photo photo Friend 40% of users made a 63% received a friend Requests friend request request “Liked” a friend’s Had their own content “Likes” content 14 times “liked” 20 times Messages Sent 9 messages Received 12 messagesPew Research Center via H EngageFebruary 2012 © 2011 – H Engage, Inc. – Proprietary and Confidential 18
  19. 19. UPDATEDMore are taking steps to manage their social network image Majority of users now restrict access to their profiles and manage the information available about them Privacy settings Privacy actions taken on social networking sites Private 2009 2011 Partially private (friends of friends) 70% Completely public 60% 50% 20% % of users 40% 30% 20% 19% 58% 10% 0% Untagged Deleted Unfriended photos comments someonePew Research Center via H EngageFebruary 2012 © 2011 – H Engage, Inc. – Proprietary and Confidential 19
  20. 20. Most access social media on their computer Computers are still the predominant way that people access social media; however, almost 2 in 5 Americans use their mobile phone How we access social media Computer 97% Mobile phone 37% Gaming console 3% iPad 3% Internet-enabled TV 2% E-reader 2% Handheld music 1% player 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 120% % of social media usersNielsen via H EngageMay 2011 © 2011 – H Engage, Inc. – Proprietary and Confidential 20
  21. 21. In mobile and social, older adults are catching up Increased utilization of mobile phones and social media is especially pronounced in 55+ age segment Year-over-year mobile Internet growth to social networking sites 109% 68% 61% 16% 13-17 18-34 35-54 55+Nielsen via H EngageMay 2011 © 2011 – H Engage, Inc. – Proprietary and Confidential 21
  22. 22. Who you know matters Increase in a persons chance of becoming obese if a 57% friend became obese. That’s more predictive than if they shared genes associated with obesity. Increase in a person’s chance of becoming happy if a 25% friend who lived within a mile became happy. Increase in a person’s chance of divorce if a friend or 75% colleague divorced. The size of the effect was measurable at two degrees of separation (friend of a friend), at 33%.Research by Nicholas Christakis © 2011 – H Engage, Inc. – Proprietary and Confidential 22
  23. 23. Who’s playing social games? The average social gamer is a 43 year old woman working full-time Employment status Gender 55% % social gamers 38% 45% % social gamers Male Female 16% 11% 10% 9% 7% Age 26% 4% 1% 1% 1% % social gamers 20% 20% 20% 11% 4% 18-21 22-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60+Information Solutions Group via H Engage2010 © 2011 – H Engage, Inc. – Proprietary and Confidential 23
  24. 24. Appendix © 2011 – H Engage, Inc. – Proprietary and Confidential 24
  25. 25. Level setting:A look at the age of the U.S. population % U.S. Population by Age 8.0% 7.4% 7.2% 7.1% 7.0% 7.0% 6.7% 6.8% 6.8% 6.5% 6.6% 6.5% 6.5% 6.4% 6.0% 5.4% 5.0% 4.0% 4.0% 3.0% 3.0% 2.4% 1.9% 2.0% 1.2% 1.0% 0.5% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0% Under 5 to 9 10 to 15 to 20 to 25 to 30 to 35 to 40 to 45 to 50 to 55 to 60 to 65 to 70 to 75 to 80 to 85 to 90 to 95 to 100 + 5 years 14 19 24 29 34 39 44 49 54 59 64 69 74 79 84 89 94 99 yearsU.S. Census Bureau via H Engage2010 © 2011 – H Engage, Inc. – Proprietary and Confidential 25

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