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Anatomy of a Paper
outline <ul><li>Why write a paper? </li></ul><ul><li>Structure. </li></ul><ul><li>The process of writing. </li></ul><ul><l...
Why write a paper? <ul><li>Communicating ideas. </li></ul><ul><li>You have a message to deliver. </li></ul><ul><li>You are...
Who is the audience? <ul><li>Academic peers. </li></ul><ul><li>Reviewers. </li></ul><ul><li>Dictates both the way you writ...
Structure <ul><li>Title </li></ul><ul><li>Abstract </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Background / Related W...
Title <ul><li>Does it describe the paper? </li></ul><ul><li>Does it excite the reader? </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t try and be ...
Example Titles <ul><li>Arabic </li></ul><ul><li>التحقيق الذكي لنظام الخدمات البنكية :  النتائج الأولية  NCC19) ) </li></ul...
Abstract <ul><li>Four sentences. </li></ul><ul><li>The first states the problem. </li></ul><ul><li>The second states why t...
Exploring the Factors of Online Engagement in the Era of Web 2.0: An Experimental Approach   <ul><li>Abstract </li></ul><u...
Introduction <ul><li>Sets the scene. </li></ul><ul><li>Provides scope. </li></ul><ul><li>States the problem. </li></ul><ul...
Introduction – outline the paper <ul><li>… </li></ul><ul><li>   The structure of the paper is as follows: section 2 illust...
Background / Related Work <ul><li>Establishes what the reader needs to know in order to understand your paper. </li></ul><...
citations and references <ul><li>write your bibliography as you go </li></ul><ul><li>always get full references </li></ul>...
References are made up of <ul><li>The authors names. </li></ul><ul><li>The title. </li></ul><ul><li>The journal / conferen...
Example references <ul><li>M. Bal.  Narratology: Introduction to the Theory of Narrative.  University of Toronto Press, 19...
Core Contributions <ul><li>This is where the novel work goes. </li></ul><ul><li>Make your argument. </li></ul><ul><li>Back...
Conclusions <ul><li>Recap. </li></ul><ul><li>Draw out the key points. </li></ul><ul><li>Establish your contribution. </li>...
Proof read carefully <ul><li>Your paper should be easy to read. </li></ul><ul><li>Spelling mistakes and poor grammar can c...
Reading order <ul><li>Title </li></ul><ul><li>Abstract </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction and Conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Cor...
Writing order (?) <ul><li>Core contribution </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Background and Related work <...
Format <ul><li>No more than 6 pages. </li></ul><ul><li>Use the template provided in JUSUR. </li></ul><ul><li>Label all fig...
 
Any Questions? Disclaimer: These slides were partially adopted from Millard, D. et al. work, Southampton University, UK.
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Anatomy Of A Paper

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Anatomy Of A Paper

  1. 1. Anatomy of a Paper
  2. 2. outline <ul><li>Why write a paper? </li></ul><ul><li>Structure. </li></ul><ul><li>The process of writing. </li></ul><ul><li>Format. </li></ul><ul><li>Questions. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Why write a paper? <ul><li>Communicating ideas. </li></ul><ul><li>You have a message to deliver. </li></ul><ul><li>You are adding to a body of work. </li></ul><ul><li>Answering questions before they are asked. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Who is the audience? <ul><li>Academic peers. </li></ul><ul><li>Reviewers. </li></ul><ul><li>Dictates both the way you write, and the content. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Structure <ul><li>Title </li></ul><ul><li>Abstract </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Background / Related Work </li></ul><ul><li>Core Contribution </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusions </li></ul><ul><li>References </li></ul>
  6. 6. Title <ul><li>Does it describe the paper? </li></ul><ul><li>Does it excite the reader? </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t try and be too clever. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Example Titles <ul><li>Arabic </li></ul><ul><li>التحقيق الذكي لنظام الخدمات البنكية : النتائج الأولية NCC19) ) </li></ul><ul><li>بناء الفصول الذكية لتعليم الطب NCC19) ) </li></ul><ul><li>الاتجاهات والتطورات الحديثة في تقنية الحاسب والإنترنت لخدمة المعاقين بصرياً . </li></ul><ul><li>توظيف تقنيات ويب 2.0 في خدمة التعليم والتدريب الإلكتروني . </li></ul><ul><li>English </li></ul><ul><li>Delicious Learning Resources. </li></ul><ul><li>From Web 1.0 to Web 2.0 and Beyond: Is the Web Becoming More Accessible for People with Visual Impairments? </li></ul><ul><li>The Arabic Language and the Semantic Web: Challenges and Opportunities. </li></ul><ul><li>Towards the Development of an Automatic Readability Measurements for Arabic Language. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Abstract <ul><li>Four sentences. </li></ul><ul><li>The first states the problem. </li></ul><ul><li>The second states why the problem is a problem. </li></ul><ul><li>The third is my startling sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>The fourth states the implication of my startling sentence. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Exploring the Factors of Online Engagement in the Era of Web 2.0: An Experimental Approach <ul><li>Abstract </li></ul><ul><li>One of the main concerns of any newly launched website is the attempt to increase the level of visitors’ engagement. Engagement, however, is vague and nebulous, its degree can be measured; using statistical tools, yet determining its factors are hard to parameterize. This paper presents our experiment in producing a theoretical framework to determine the factors affecting websites visitor engagement in the era of Web 2.0. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Introduction <ul><li>Sets the scene. </li></ul><ul><li>Provides scope. </li></ul><ul><li>States the problem. </li></ul><ul><li>Describes what you think the solution could be. (hypothesis) </li></ul><ul><li>Tells the reader what comes next. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Introduction – outline the paper <ul><li>… </li></ul><ul><li>   The structure of the paper is as follows: section 2 illustrates the significance of the study, section 3 presents the methodology we embraced to explore the factors of online engagement. Section 4 discusses the results and finally section 5 and 6 present similar works and conclusion, respectively. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Background / Related Work <ul><li>Establishes what the reader needs to know in order to understand your paper. </li></ul><ul><li>Establishes that you know the field you are working in. </li></ul><ul><li>Places the work in the context of existing work in the field. </li></ul><ul><li>It is NOT a dump of everything you know about the topic. </li></ul>
  13. 13. citations and references <ul><li>write your bibliography as you go </li></ul><ul><li>always get full references </li></ul><ul><li>AVOID URLs </li></ul><ul><li>record how and when </li></ul><ul><li>collect to a standard format </li></ul><ul><li>(see our paper template) </li></ul><ul><li>ensure that all your references are complete – could a reader go to the source unaided? </li></ul><ul><li>some tools enable automatic formatting of citations </li></ul><ul><li>EndNote is a bibliographic database which works with MS Word. </li></ul><ul><li>OnFolio is a web notation tool which works with MS Office (free download). </li></ul><ul><li>Zotero (add-on) for firefox. </li></ul>
  14. 14. References are made up of <ul><li>The authors names. </li></ul><ul><li>The title. </li></ul><ul><li>The journal / conference proceedings. </li></ul><ul><li>Publishers information. </li></ul><ul><li>Editor information. </li></ul><ul><li>Page numbers. </li></ul><ul><li>Volume numbers. </li></ul><ul><li>Issue numbers. </li></ul><ul><li>Geographical locations (of conferences). </li></ul><ul><li>Dates. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Example references <ul><li>M. Bal. Narratology: Introduction to the Theory of Narrative. University of Toronto Press, 1985. Trans. Christine van Boheemen. Toronto. 1985. </li></ul><ul><li>A. K. Dey. Understanding and using context. Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, Special issue on Situated Interaction and Ubiquitous Computing, 5(1), 2001. </li></ul><ul><li>M. Bernstein. Card shark and thespis: exotic tools for hypertext narrative. In Proceedings of the twelfth ACM conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia, pages 41–50. ACM Press, 2001. </li></ul><ul><li>R. Bartle. Interactive multi-user computer games. Technical report, BT Martlesham Research Laboratories, Dec. 1990. Annotated version available from http:// www.mud.co.uk/richard/imucg.htm . </li></ul>
  16. 16. Core Contributions <ul><li>This is where the novel work goes. </li></ul><ul><li>Make your argument. </li></ul><ul><li>Back it up with reference to other work. </li></ul><ul><li>Explain your Methodology. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide the results of your evaluation/testing/interviews/… </li></ul>
  17. 17. Conclusions <ul><li>Recap. </li></ul><ul><li>Draw out the key points. </li></ul><ul><li>Establish your contribution. </li></ul><ul><li>Outline where the work could go in the future. </li></ul><ul><li>Try NOT to introduce new information. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Proof read carefully <ul><li>Your paper should be easy to read. </li></ul><ul><li>Spelling mistakes and poor grammar can create a bad impression. </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure the numbering is correct for sections/figures/tables. </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure all your references are cited in the text. </li></ul>
  19. 19. Reading order <ul><li>Title </li></ul><ul><li>Abstract </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction and Conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Core contribution </li></ul><ul><li>Background and Related work </li></ul>
  20. 20. Writing order (?) <ul><li>Core contribution </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Background and Related work </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Abstract </li></ul><ul><li>Title (?) </li></ul>
  21. 21. Format <ul><li>No more than 6 pages. </li></ul><ul><li>Use the template provided in JUSUR. </li></ul><ul><li>Label all figures and tables and refer to them in the body of your text. </li></ul>
  22. 23. Any Questions? Disclaimer: These slides were partially adopted from Millard, D. et al. work, Southampton University, UK.

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