Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Chapter 20:  The Energy of Waves
 
Animation courtesy of Dr. Dan Russell, Kettering University
What is a wave? (Besides at a ballgame…lol) <ul><li>Any disturbance that transmits energy through matter or space </li></u...
What do waves carry? <ul><li>ENERGY!!! </li></ul><ul><li>Waves do not move particles. </li></ul>
Some waves need help to travel… <ul><li>A medium is a substance through which a wave can travel. </li></ul><ul><li>A mediu...
How waves travel: <ul><li>Transverse: particles move up and down perpendicular to direction of the wave </li></ul><ul><li>...
Section 2:Properties of Waves
B. Transverse Waves <ul><li>Wave Anatomy </li></ul>corresponds to the amount of energy carried by the wave crests troughs ...
C. Longitudinal Waves <ul><li>Wave Anatomy </li></ul>Amount of compression corresponds to amount of energy    AMPLITUDE. ...
Longitudinal Wave <ul><ul><li>Compression - dense regions- like the crest of a transverse wave </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>...
Properties of Waves <ul><li>Amplitude: maximum wave height from the rest position; larger amplitude = more energy </li></u...
Waves <ul><li>The more energy a wave carries, the  greater  its amplitude </li></ul><ul><ul><li>High amplitude in compress...
Waves <ul><li>The amplitude of  compressional  waves is related to how tightly the medium is pushed together at compressio...
Properties of Waves… <ul><li>Frequency: the  number  of waves produced in a given amount of time; measured in hertz (Hz); ...
D. Measuring Waves <ul><li>Velocity  ( v ) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>speed of a wave as it moves forward </li></ul></ul><ul><u...
D. Measuring Waves <ul><li>EX : Find the velocity of a wave in a wave pool if its wavelength is 3.2 m and its frequency is...
D. Measuring Waves <ul><li>EX : An earthquake produces a wave that has a wavelength of 417 m and travels at 5000 m/s.  Wha...
Waves <ul><li>Light waves travel faster in  gases  and  vacuums  than in liquids and solids </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Radiatio...
Waves <ul><li>Amplitude of  transverse  waves </li></ul><ul><li>Distance from crest or trough of a wave to the  rest posit...
<ul><li>Breaking a glass with sound- resonance:  http://www.teachersdomain.org/resources/lsps07/sci/phys/energy/glassbreak...
Wave Interactions
Wave Interactions… Reflection <ul><li>Reflection : occurs when a wave bounces back after striking a barrier </li></ul><ul>...
More wave interactions… <ul><li>Refraction  is the bending of a wave as it passes at an angle from one medium to another. ...
Wave interactions… <ul><li>Diffraction: the bending of waves around or through an opening; diffraction depends on waveleng...
Last wave interaction… <ul><li>Interference : the result of 2 or more waves overlapping. </li></ul><ul><li>a.  constructiv...
More on interference waves <ul><li>Can create standing waves </li></ul><ul><li>Standing wave  is a wave that forms a stati...
Standing Waves
Interference Waves  can be deadly! July 1, 1940- Tacoma Bridge Accident
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Chapter 20

2,247 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Health & Medicine
  • Light and its nature have caused a lot of ink to flow during these last decades. Its dual behavior is partly explained by (1)Double-slit experiment of Thomas Young - who represents the photon’s motion as a wave - and also by (2)the Photoelectric effect in which the photon is considered as a particle. A Revolution: SALEH THEORY solves this ambiguity and this difficulty presenting a three-dimensional trajectory for the photon's motion and a new formula to calculate its energy. More information on https://youtu.be/mLtpARXuMbM
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Light and its nature have caused a lot of ink to flow during these last decades. Its dual behavior is partly explained by (1)Double-slit experiment of Thomas Young - who represents the photon’s motion as a wave - and also by (2)the Photoelectric effect in which the photon is considered as a particle. A Revolution: SALEH THEORY solves this ambiguity and this difficulty presenting a three-dimensional trajectory for the photon's motion and a new formula to calculate its energy. More information on https://youtu.be/mLtpARXuMbM
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Chapter 20

  1. 1. Chapter 20: The Energy of Waves
  2. 3. Animation courtesy of Dr. Dan Russell, Kettering University
  3. 4. What is a wave? (Besides at a ballgame…lol) <ul><li>Any disturbance that transmits energy through matter or space </li></ul><ul><li>Where are they? </li></ul><ul><li>a. in the ocean </li></ul><ul><li>b. microwave ovens </li></ul><ul><li>c. light waves from the sun </li></ul><ul><li>d. sound waves </li></ul><ul><li>e. radio waves </li></ul>
  4. 5. What do waves carry? <ul><li>ENERGY!!! </li></ul><ul><li>Waves do not move particles. </li></ul>
  5. 6. Some waves need help to travel… <ul><li>A medium is a substance through which a wave can travel. </li></ul><ul><li>A medium can be a solid, liquid, or gas. </li></ul><ul><li>What waves need a medium? </li></ul><ul><li>a. sound </li></ul><ul><li>b. ocean waves </li></ul><ul><li>What are these waves called that require a medium? Mechanical Wave </li></ul><ul><li>Waves that do not require a medium are called electromagnetic waves. </li></ul>
  6. 7. How waves travel: <ul><li>Transverse: particles move up and down perpendicular to direction of the wave </li></ul><ul><li>Longitudinal Waves (also called Compressional Waves): particles vibrate back and forth along the path of the wave travels </li></ul><ul><li>Surface Waves: combination of transverse and longitudinal waves </li></ul>
  7. 8. Section 2:Properties of Waves
  8. 9. B. Transverse Waves <ul><li>Wave Anatomy </li></ul>corresponds to the amount of energy carried by the wave crests troughs wavelength wavelength amplitude amplitude nodes
  9. 10. C. Longitudinal Waves <ul><li>Wave Anatomy </li></ul>Amount of compression corresponds to amount of energy  AMPLITUDE. rarefaction compression wavelength wavelength
  10. 11. Longitudinal Wave <ul><ul><li>Compression - dense regions- like the crest of a transverse wave </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rarefaction- less dense regions- like the trough of a transverse wave </li></ul></ul>
  11. 12. Properties of Waves <ul><li>Amplitude: maximum wave height from the rest position; larger amplitude = more energy </li></ul><ul><li>Wavelength: distance between crest to crest or trough to trough; compression to compression or rarefaction to rarefaction </li></ul>
  12. 13. Waves <ul><li>The more energy a wave carries, the greater its amplitude </li></ul><ul><ul><li>High amplitude in compressional waves means that medium is pushed together more at the compressions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>High amplitude in transverse waves means taller crests and deeper troughs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.sfu.ca/sonic-studio/handbook/Amplitude.html </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://id.mind.net/~zona/mstm/physics/waves/introduction/introductionWaves.html </li></ul></ul>
  13. 14. Waves <ul><li>The amplitude of compressional waves is related to how tightly the medium is pushed together at compression </li></ul><ul><li>Denser compressions = larger amplitude = more energy </li></ul><ul><li>Less dense rarefactions = lower amplitude = LESS energy </li></ul>
  14. 15. Properties of Waves… <ul><li>Frequency: the number of waves produced in a given amount of time; measured in hertz (Hz); 1 Hz = 1 wave per second (1 Hz = 1/s); higher frequency means higher energy </li></ul><ul><li>Period: the time it takes for a complete vibration </li></ul>
  15. 16. D. Measuring Waves <ul><li>Velocity ( v ) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>speed of a wave as it moves forward </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>depends on wave type and medium </li></ul></ul>v =  × f v : velocity (m/s)  : wavelength (m) f : frequency (Hz)
  16. 17. D. Measuring Waves <ul><li>EX : Find the velocity of a wave in a wave pool if its wavelength is 3.2 m and its frequency is 0.60 Hz. </li></ul>WORK: v =  × f v = (3.2 m)(0.60 Hz) v = 1.92 m/s GIVEN: v = ?  = 3.2 m f = 0.60 Hz  v f
  17. 18. D. Measuring Waves <ul><li>EX : An earthquake produces a wave that has a wavelength of 417 m and travels at 5000 m/s. What is its frequency? </li></ul>WORK: f = v ÷  f = (5000 m/s) ÷ (417 m) f = 12 Hz GIVEN:  = 417 m v = 5000 m/s f = ?  v f
  18. 19. Waves <ul><li>Light waves travel faster in gases and vacuums than in liquids and solids </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Radiation moves faster when particles are not in the way </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Why are some earthquakes very damaging and other barely felt? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Depends on the energy of the wave. </li></ul></ul>
  19. 20. Waves <ul><li>Amplitude of transverse waves </li></ul><ul><li>Distance from crest or trough of a wave to the rest position of the medium </li></ul><ul><li>Higher ocean waves = more energy! </li></ul>
  20. 21. <ul><li>Breaking a glass with sound- resonance: http://www.teachersdomain.org/resources/lsps07/sci/phys/energy/glassbreak/index.html </li></ul><ul><li>Sound from sand dunes: http://www.teachersdomain.org/resources/hew06/sci/phys/maf/boomsand/index.html </li></ul><ul><li>Light as particles: http://www.teachersdomain.org/resources/phy03/sci/phys/fund/uncertainty/index.html </li></ul>
  21. 22. Wave Interactions
  22. 23. Wave Interactions… Reflection <ul><li>Reflection : occurs when a wave bounces back after striking a barrier </li></ul><ul><li>All waves can be reflected. </li></ul><ul><li>Reflected sound waves are called echoes . </li></ul><ul><li>Sunlight is being reflected off of the moon at night. </li></ul><ul><li>Water waves reflect off a shoreline. </li></ul>
  23. 24. More wave interactions… <ul><li>Refraction is the bending of a wave as it passes at an angle from one medium to another. Speed of refraction depends on the medium. </li></ul>
  24. 25. Wave interactions… <ul><li>Diffraction: the bending of waves around or through an opening; diffraction depends on wavelength and the size of barrier/opening </li></ul>
  25. 26. Last wave interaction… <ul><li>Interference : the result of 2 or more waves overlapping. </li></ul><ul><li>a. constructive interference : increases the amplitude of a wave </li></ul><ul><li>b. destructive interference : decreases the amplitude of a wave </li></ul><ul><li>Great diagram of waves </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.sciencejoywagon.com/physicszone/09waves/ </li></ul>
  26. 27. More on interference waves <ul><li>Can create standing waves </li></ul><ul><li>Standing wave is a wave that forms a stationary pattern in which portions of the wave are at the rest position. </li></ul><ul><li>Standing waves have nodes and antinodes. </li></ul>
  27. 28. Standing Waves
  28. 29. Interference Waves can be deadly! July 1, 1940- Tacoma Bridge Accident

×