Changing Behavior<br />Using RTI to Manage Student Behavior<br />Progress Monitoring : Tier 1<br />
Why Use RTI to Change Behavior? <br />The RTI process of screening all students can also be used for behavior difficulties...
Introduction to RTI for Behavior<br />This link will bring us to a short video that outlines that characteristics and step...
How do we start? <br />We begin with Tier 1 <br />Screening of all students <br />Comparing their performance (similar to ...
Define Behavior<br />The students behavior must be CLEARLY DEFINED<br />A clear definition is a proactive measure <br />Fa...
Define Behavior<br />Speaks<br />Kicks<br />Verbalizes<br />Hands in<br />Hits<br />Arrives<br />Sits <br />Swears<br />As...
Tier 1<br />It is important to collect baseline data of student behavior <br />Collect 3-5 data points or measurements for...
Screening all Students<br />Lets ask ourselves how are we going to collect data on behavior? <br />There are many ways to ...
Direct Observation Recording Methods<br />All of the methods mentions are Direct Observation Recording methods<br />These ...
Permanent Products<br />This form of recording requires observation of the student<br />The educators tallies the tangible...
Event Recording<br />This method requires the least amount of time<br />Teachers tally the number of time a response (e.g....
Duration Recording<br />This method of recording tracks the length of time a behavior occurs <br />Example: Length of a ta...
Latency Recording <br />This method of recording is used to record the time from a specified event (instruction) to the st...
Interval Recording<br />Method used to provide an estimate of the percentage of intervals in which a behavior occurred <br...
Whole-Interval Recording<br />This method can be used when a behavior occurs throughout the entire specified time interval...
Partial Interval<br />This method is used when a behavior occurs at any point during the specified time interval <br />Exa...
Momentary Time Sample<br />This method is used to record a behavior if it is being performed at the end of an interval <br...
Where do I record my data? <br />Recording data can be as simple as using paper and pencil <br />Important information tha...
Graphing your Data <br />Educators should plot their data points to SEE if an intervention is working or not<br />Use a si...
How Can I Fit This In? <br />Choose a form of direct observation recording methods that will best fit the behaviors as wel...
Tier 1<br />Tier 1 interventions are done IN the general education classroom <br />Universal interventions include all set...
Resources<br />http://www.interventioncentral.org/home<br />http://www.interventioncentral.org/behavioral-interventions<br...
References <br />http://www.interventioncentral.org/blog/rti-20-assessment-progress-monitoring/helping-teachers-structure-...
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Sped 478 rti progress monitoring

  1. 1. Changing Behavior<br />Using RTI to Manage Student Behavior<br />Progress Monitoring : Tier 1<br />
  2. 2. Why Use RTI to Change Behavior? <br />The RTI process of screening all students can also be used for behavior difficulties, NOT JUST academic difficulties<br />Three tiers of supports for all educators and staff<br />Interventions are research-based<br />Progress monitoring and charting<br />Students stay in the general education classroom<br />Educators can SEE if an intervention is successful or not <br />
  3. 3. Introduction to RTI for Behavior<br />This link will bring us to a short video that outlines that characteristics and steps of implementing RTI for classroom management and the skills that educators need for this system to be successful: <br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gKwPFH3xKkM<br />
  4. 4. How do we start? <br />We begin with Tier 1 <br />Screening of all students <br />Comparing their performance (similar to a criterion measure) <br />Begin progress monitoring <br />Use data and graphs to show student performance <br />Fall, Winter, Spring<br />Assess whether students are progressing<br />Define the behavior<br />
  5. 5. Define Behavior<br />The students behavior must be CLEARLY DEFINED<br />A clear definition is a proactive measure <br />Facilitates communication among: Student, Teacher, Family, and Behavioral Support Specialist <br />Goals are easier to establish if a specific behavior is defined <br />The definition of the behavior is VERY important <br />Must provide complete information on when the behavior occurs and when it does not<br />Must be accurate<br />
  6. 6. Define Behavior<br />Speaks<br />Kicks<br />Verbalizes<br />Hands in<br />Hits<br />Arrives<br />Sits <br />Swears<br />Asks<br />Gives <br />Appreciates<br />Discovers<br />Comprehends<br />Initiates <br />Perceives<br />Respects <br />Beliefs<br />Intends<br />Knows<br />Commits<br />Recognizes<br />Realizes<br />Observable Behavior<br />Unobservable Behavior<br />
  7. 7. Tier 1<br />It is important to collect baseline data of student behavior <br />Collect 3-5 data points or measurements for the baseline<br />The baseline serves as a way to compare student behavior after an intervention<br />
  8. 8. Screening all Students<br />Lets ask ourselves how are we going to collect data on behavior? <br />There are many ways to collect data on behavior: <br />Permanent Products<br />Event Recording<br />Duration Recording<br />Latency Recording<br />Interval Recording:<br />Whole Interval Recording<br />Partial Interval Recording<br />Momentary Time Sample Recording<br />
  9. 9. Direct Observation Recording Methods<br />All of the methods mentions are Direct Observation Recording methods<br />These methods are discussed because they are easier for teachers to use and do in their classroom<br />There are many different ways that we can collect data on our student’s behaviors for a good reason<br />Certain behaviors are more amenable to certain recording protocols <br />Each recording protocol requires a different level of effort as well<br />
  10. 10. Permanent Products<br />This form of recording requires observation of the student<br />The educators tallies the tangible product of a students behavior<br />Example: A student rips up papers or knocks over desks during a tantrum – the amount of papers ripped or the desks knocked over would be tallied <br />The actual behavior is not observed <br />Use when behavior leaves an enduring product<br />
  11. 11. Event Recording<br />This method requires the least amount of time<br />Teachers tally the number of time a response (e.g. talk outs) occur during a specific period of time <br />To use this method, the behavior must be discrete as well as have a CLEAR beginning and end <br />If a student repeatedly get in and out of his chair (student with attention deficit disorder) this would be overwhelming for the educator to tally <br />Each response (e.g. talk outs) should be relatively equal in duration <br />
  12. 12. Duration Recording<br />This method of recording tracks the length of time a behavior occurs <br />Example: Length of a tantrum, length of time engaged in academic task (appropriate behavior can be measured as well)<br />Like Frequency Recording, the behavior must be discrete as well as have a CLEAR beginning and end <br />Could require a lot of an educators undivided attention<br />Additional classroom support needed <br />
  13. 13. Latency Recording <br />This method of recording is used to record the time from a specified event (instruction) to the start of the targeted behavior or response (working on the worksheet) <br />Perfect for compliance recording <br />Example: Teaching a student to follow directions in the classroom<br />Could require a lot of an educators undivided attention <br />Additional classroom support needed<br />
  14. 14. Interval Recording<br />Method used to provide an estimate of the percentage of intervals in which a behavior occurred <br />In other words, the recording of the presence OR absence of a behavior within a specified time frame<br />This method is good for discrete behavior that DO NOT have a clear beginning and end <br />There are three types of Interval Recording procedures<br />
  15. 15. Whole-Interval Recording<br />This method can be used when a behavior occurs throughout the entire specified time interval <br />Example: On-task behavior, in-seat behavior<br />This method does not require a behavior to have a clear ending or beginning<br />The behavior must be continuous or occurs frequently <br />
  16. 16. Partial Interval<br />This method is used when a behavior occurs at any point during the specified time interval <br />Example: Off-task behavior, out-of-seat behavior <br />This should be used for behaviors that we want to DECREASE<br />Additional staff support is recommended <br />
  17. 17. Momentary Time Sample<br />This method is used to record a behavior if it is being performed at the end of an interval <br />Example: Off-task behavior, out-of-seat behavior <br />This is the easiest of the interval recordings for educators to use <br />A concern with this method is whether the behavior at the end of the interval represents that behavior during the entire interval <br />
  18. 18. Where do I record my data? <br />Recording data can be as simple as using paper and pencil <br />Important information that should be included on the data sheet: <br />Student name or identification number<br />Location<br />Teacher’s name<br />Date <br />Length of observation<br />Definition of target behavior <br />The simpler the better! <br />Resource: http://rtitools.com/Cool/<br />
  19. 19. Graphing your Data <br />Educators should plot their data points to SEE if an intervention is working or not<br />Use a simple line graph <br />Graphs should contain: <br />Baseline data <br />A vertical line to separate intervention and follow up <br />Measure of behavior on the vertical side (left) <br />Unit of time on the bottom of graph <br />Description of intervention <br />
  20. 20. How Can I Fit This In? <br />Choose a form of direct observation recording methods that will best fit the behaviors as well as your schedules<br />Make it work! <br />Request additional staff support when needed or appropriate<br />The majority of direct observation recording methods are quick and do not take a lot of time<br />
  21. 21. Tier 1<br />Tier 1 interventions are done IN the general education classroom <br />Universal interventions include all settings, all students <br />Preventive and Proactive <br />If an educator has tried multiple research-based interventions and a student or students do not respond it is important to contact other educators and professionals to collaborate <br />
  22. 22. Resources<br />http://www.interventioncentral.org/home<br />http://www.interventioncentral.org/behavioral-interventions<br />http://www.rtitools.com/<br />http://www.rti4success.org/<br />
  23. 23. References <br />http://www.interventioncentral.org/blog/rti-20-assessment-progress-monitoring/helping-teachers-structure-their-classroom-tier-1-data-co<br />http://www.interventioncentral.org/behavioral-interventions<br />Martella, Ronald C., J.Ron Nelson, Nancy E. Marchand-Martella, and Mark O'Rielly. Comprehensive Behavior Management Individualized, Classroom, and Schoolwide Approaches. 2nd. SAGE, 2012. 74-108. Print.<br />

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